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Full text of "Radio Television Mirror (Jul-Dec 1951)"

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PUBLISHER'S BINDING 







Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY cf CONGRESS 







Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 

www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 








JAN!** 5 * 



PUBLISH BWDUW 



RADIO 






GODFREY'S MARION MARLOWE 
Guiding Light -Young Dr. Malone 
BIG GENE AUTRY CONTEST! 





Your complexion is smoother— clearer, 
too— with your First Cake of Camay! 

MRS. JACK STANTON, 

the former Marian Richards oj California, 

is a recent— and lovely— Camay Bride 



Doesn't Marian Stanton look like a 
story-book princess? Her hair is the color 
of spun gold— her eyes are azure. Yes, and 
Marian has a complexion soft and lovely 
as any heroine of fiction. Her first cake 
of Camay brought romantic new 
beauty to her skin! 

Say "Camay" and Marian's eyes sparkle. 
"Camay smooths and freshens your 
complexion so quickly," she confides to 

friends. "Why, when I changed to 
regular care and mild, gentle Camay— my 
very first cake brought a clearer, 
softer look to my skin! " 

You'll be lovelfer, too— when you change 

to regular care— use Camay alone. Camay's 
lather is rich and creamy— just the kind 

you need to wake the sleeping beauty of 
your skin. Use Camay— and a softer, 
clearer complexion will be your reward! 



Mild and gentle Camay— 
there's nothing finer! 

Camay's gentle, creamy lather is sheer 
delight to use— it's soft as satin to your 
skin. And remember this — the larger 
cake, the thrifty "Beauty-Bath" size, is 
Camay at its finest. Use it for more 
lather— more luxury— more of every- 
thing you like about Camay! 





CAMAY 



AY h 





New beauty for all your skin! 

Bathe with gentle, rich -lathering Camay, 
too — give all your skin a luxurious beauty 
treatment! The daily Camay Beauty Bath 
brings arms and back and shoulders that 
"beautifully cared-for" look. It touches you 
with Camay's flattering fragrance! 



The Soap of Beautiful Women 




>* * TwoUrt 



WHAT A DAMNING thing to say about 
a pretty girl out to make the most 
of her holiday! Attracted by her good 
looks, men dated her once but never 
took her out a second time. And for a 
very good reason*. So, the vacation that 
could have been so gay and exciting, 
became a dull and dreary flop. And she, 
herself, was the last to suspect why. 

How's Your Breath Today? 

Unfortunately, you can be guilty of 
halitosis (unpleasant breath) without 



realizing it. Rather than guess about 
this condition or run a foolish risk, why 
not get into the habit of using Listerine 
Antiseptic? Rinse the mouth with it 
night and morning, and between times 
before every date where you want to be 
at your best. It's efficient! It's refreshing! 
It's delightful! 

To Be Extra-Careful 

Listerine Antiseptic is the extra-careful 
precaution because it freshens 

. not for 



sweetens 



because 
the breath 



and 



mere 



seconds or minutes . . . but for hours, usually. 
So, don't trust makeshifts which may 
be effective only momentarily . . . trust 
Listerine, the lasting precaution. It's 
part of your passport to popularity. 



*Though sometimes systemic, most cases 
of halitosis are due to the bacterial fermen- 
tation of tiny food particles. Listerine 
Antiseptic quickly halts such oral fermen- 
tation, and overcomes the odors it causes. 

Lambert Pharmacal Co., St. Louis, Mo. 




BEFORE ANY DATE... LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC 

.../fs 6reat/t-tafo*n(j[i 




READER'S DIGEST* Reported The Same 

Research Which Proves That Brushing Teeth 

Right After Eating with 

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM 
STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST 

Reader's Digest recently reported the 
same research which proves the Colgate 
way of brushing teeth right after eating 
stops tooth decay best! The most thor- 
oughly proved and accepted home meth- 
od of oral hygiene known today! 

Yes, and 2 years' research showed the 
Colgate way stopped more decay for more 
people than ever before reported in denti- 
frice history! No other dentifrice, ammo- 
niated or not.offers such conclusive proof! 



■ 

-Thanks to Colgate Dental Cream 



§ SINCE COLGATE CARE HAS SET ME RIGHT 





*YOU SHOULD KNOW! While not mentioned by name, 
Colgate's was the only toothpaste used in the research 
on tooth decay recently reported In Reader's Digest. 



JULY, 1951 RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR VOL. 36, NO. 2 



Contents 



Keystone Edition 

FRED R. SAMMIS, Editor-in-Chief 

Doris McFerran, Editor; Jack Zasorin, Art Director; Matt Basile, Art Editor; 

Josephine Pearson, Assistant Editor; Marie Haller, Assistant Editor; 

Dorothy Brand, Editorial Assistant; Esther Foley, Home Service Director; 

Television: Frances Kish. 

Helen Cambria Bolstad, Chicago Editor; Lyle Hooks, Hollywood Editor; 

Frances Morrin, Hollywood Assistant Editor; Hymie Fink, Staff Photographer; 

Betty Jo Rice, Assistant Photographer 





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Ford Bond 

Those Quiz Kids: 

Best Letters In Answer to Althea Bigby Problem 

What July Fourth Means To Me by Jim Hurlbut 

Who's Who In TV 

by Ed Sullivan 
by Gladys Hall 
by Judith Field 



The Pleasure to Present 
Three Happy People 
Happily Ever After . 
Lucky Marion Marlowe 
Come and Visit Tony Martin . 
Groucho-isms 

The Woman In My House 
Gene Autry Prize Round-Up . . 
Special Section: Soncs For 



by Fredda Dudley Balling 



. by Gene Autry 
Sale 



They All Know Me ... by Jan Murray 

Hayes Fever 

lips For Tune Writers 

Sheet Music lor Songs For Sale Contest 

Call Me Mother! ... by Margaret Whiting 

Saturday at the Shamrock 

Radio Television Mirror Header Bonus: A Reason for Living 
by Evelyn Fiore 

Fun of the Month 

Poetry 

Art Linkletter's Nonsense and Some-Sense 

Selecting A Sitter . by Terry Burton 

Television For Children by William Parker 

A New Figure . . by Dorry Ellis 

This Is My Life . by Grace Matthews 

Daytime Serial Fashions For You 

Junior Mirror 

Suit Yourself Sundaes ... by Nancy Craig 

WINS: Platter Spinning Professor 
WCOP: The Lollipop Set 
WCBS: Stay Up Stan * 
WGR: Man About Midnight 



Information Booth 

Program Highlights in Television Viewing 
8:1 Daytime Diary 



ON THE COVER: COLOR PORTRAIT OF ED SULLIVAN BY CAMERA ASSOCIATES 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Mactadden ^OUi:atinne.lne.,tiew 
York. N. Y., average net paid circulation 470.024 for o 
months ending June 30. 1950. _.„„ 

EXECUTIVE. ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 
205 East 42nd Street, New York. N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive. Beverly Hills. Calif., and 
22 1 North LaSalle Street. Chicago. 111. Harold A. Wise, Presi- 
dent; James L. Mitchell and Fred R. Sammis. Vice Presidents, 
Mesr-r Dworkin, Secretary and Treasurer. Advertising officer 
also in Boston, Chicago. San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $3.00 one year, U. S. and Posses 
sions, and Canada. $5.00 per year for all other countries. 
CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a recent 
issue Address changes can be made only if you send us your 

Member of The TRUE 



old as .veil as your new address. Write to Radio Tele- 
vision Mirror, 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17 N V 
MANUSCRIPTS, DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should be 
accompanied by addressed envelope and return postage and 
will be carefully considered, but publisher cannot lie re- 
sponsible for loss or injurv. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter Feb. 13, 1951. at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P. o. Dept. , Ottawa 
Ont., Canada. Copyright 1951 bv Macfadden Publications. Inc 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Pan 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria v Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U. S. Patenl Office. Printed in O S. A. bv Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Grout 



, 



Take the SIMMER out of SUMMER 



For cool comfort, slimness-in-action, 
top designers suggest you wear 



PLAYTEX PINK-ICE 




What's new? Shorter, narrow slacks— longer, slim shorts— sleek swimsuits— 
sheer, slim-draped dresses. Newest of all is your figure, in a Playtex Pink-Ice 
Girdle. Made by a new latex process, figure-slimming Pink-Ice is snowflake- 
light, daisy-fresh, dispels body heat. It's invisible, even under a swimsuit— it 
hasn't a seam, stitch or bone. Washes in seconds, dries with a towel. 





BAtMAIN, fabulous Paris 
couturier : "playtex slims 
and moulds you smooth- 
ly, in complete comfort, 
and it fits invisibly under 
all of your clothes." 



CAROLYN SCHNURER, fa- 
mous for casuals: "Slim- 
ness is no problem if you 
wear a playtex under 
everything. It slims you, 
melts the inches away!" 






Choose from the 3 most popular 
girdles in the world 



TINA LESER, New York 
originator : "To have this 
new, supple silhouette, 
wear a playtex— the gir- 
dle that slims you where 
you need slimming." 



JEAN DESSES, Parisian 
designer : "I'm designing 
slimly draped, supple 
clothes, and I'm recom- 
mending playtex to be 
worn underneath them!" 



DAYTIME HIT! 

FASHION MAGIC! 
featuring popular 
stars and famous 
fashion designers. 
CBS-TV Network, 
see local papers 
for time and channel. 



PLAYTEX PINK-ICE GIRDLE 

A new latex process. Light as a snowflake, 
fresh as a daisy, dispels body heat. SLIM, 
shimmering pink tube $4.95 and $5.95 

PLAYTEX FAB-LINED GIRDLE 

With fabric next to your skin. You'll look 
slim and feel wonderfully comfortable. In 
SLIM golden tube . . $5.95 and $6.95 

PLAYTEX LIVING® GIRDLE 

More figure-control, greater freedom than 
girdles costing over three times as much. 
In SLIM silvery tube . . $3.95 and $4.95 

At department stores and better specialty shops everywhere 

Sizes: extra-small, small, medium, large. 

Extra-large size slightly higher. 

Prices slightly higher in Canada and foreign Countries 

INTERNATIONAL LATEX CORP'N. Playtex Park ©i9si Dover Del. 
PLAYTEX LTD. Montreal, Canada 







In 



for a 





hair-do 

ever y day 
all day 



more women use 




HOLDBOB 

bobby pins than all other 
brands combined 

SET CURLS EASIER 

HOLD HAIR-DOS BETTER 




t 









Fun of 

the 
month 




for NEW hair-do glamour 
wear the NEW, modern 

"Permanized" ~ 
Run-Resistant 

HAIR NETS 

O >••' 6AY10RD PRODUCTS. INCORPORATED. CHICASO. III. 







Bing Crosby Show 

Carpenter: That's what you need on the 
program, Bing — more news. Like Lou- 
ella Parsons, Walter Winchell, Senator 
Kefauver . . . 

Crosby: Wait a minute Ken. The Ke- 
fauver program is a quiz show. Why, 
they even had a mystery tune. 

Carpenter: What was that? 

Crosby: "How Could You Believe Me 
When 1 Said I Don't Remember When 
You Know I've Been A Liar All My 
Life." 

Bing Crosby Show: Wednesday at 9:30 

P.M. EDT, CBS. 



Elmer Davis 

Elmer Davis, noted news commentator 
says: "French statesmen are like a deck 
of cards. They get reshuffled now and 
then, but the same faces turn up around 
the table only in a somewhat different 
order." 

Elmer Davis presents the news M-F, 7:15 
P.M. EDT, ABC. 



The Jack Benny Show 

Kitzel: My poor brother! Tomorrow his 
wife's relatives are coming from the 
East to visit him, and today he gets 
sick with the intentional flu. 

Benny: No, no, Mr. Kitzel. That's in- 
testinal flu. 

Kitzel: It's intentional. You should see 
his wife's relatives! 

The Jack Benny Show: Sunday .at 7:00 

P.M. EDT, over CBS. 

Life With Luiai 

Luigi: America is even bigger than a 
supermarket! Take the different states 
Kansas is got wheat, Minnesota is got 
corn, California is got fruit and Mil- 
waukee is got beer! And one state, 
Kentucky, is even famous for hats. I 
always hear people talk about the Ken- 
tucky Derby. 

Life With Luigi is heard Tuesday at 9:00 

P.M. EDT, over/ CBS. 

Ken Murray Show 

Douglas Fairbanks Jr.: Ken, are you tell- 
ing me you are the athletic type? 

Ken Murray: How do you suppose I got 
in this shape? 

Douglas Fairbanks Jr.: Carelessness, I 
guess. 

Ken Murray Show: Saturday at 8:00 P.M. 

EDT, over CBS-TV. 

We The People 

Four zoot-suited teen-agers, members of 
the Brooklyn gang whose activities made 
headlines, fidgeted nervously as Dan Sey- 
mour introduced the evening's guests. 
Some of them were members of foreign 
nobility now employed at unusual jobs in 
the United States. "Tonight," said Sey- 
mour, "we have royalty with us, a glitter- 
ing array of titled guests." "That's us. 
you guys," whispered one of the Brook- 
lynites. Seymour continued his introduc- 
tion, "Prince Nicolo Corsini . . . Count 
Igor Cassini — " "What's dis," interrupted 
one of the toughs, "what mob are dem 
bums wit'!" 

We The People: Friday, 8:30 P.M. EDT. 
NBC-TV. 







FORD BOND 



Advice to aspiring radio announcers : 
learn to sing. That's how Ford 
Bond started twenty-eight years ago in 
Louisville, Kentucky, and Bond has just 
celebrated his twentieth anniversary as 
announcer with the same sponsor, Cities 
Service, over NBC. This marks the 
longest sponsor-announcer association 
in the history of radio. 

"I entered radio via the singing 
route," he explains, "as did 99 per cent 
of all announcers in those days. At the 
age of five, I had started singing for 
yawning relatives gathered together on 
feast days." 

In Ford's family circle, however, 
yawning must have been a sign of ap- 
proval, for he was encouraged not only 
to continue his singing lessons, but also 
to add the study of the violin and the 
piano to his activities. 

But music remained his prime inter- 
est and commanded so much of his time 
and thinking that he left college to ac- 
cept a musical post with a commercial 
firm in the South. 

In 1922, in Louisville, Bond accepted 
a singing and announcing offer with the 
local radio station. In eight years he 
progressed to general program execu- 
tive, and left to join NBC in 1929. 

In New York, Ford specialized in 
sports and news broadcasting, but 
among his assignments was the an- 
nouncer's post for Cities Service. Now 
announcer for Band of America, Bond 
has remained through the changes in 
personnel and program format which 
lave occurred under Cities Service 
sponsorship. 

Bond married a Kentucky girl, Mary 

Elizabeth Ford, and they live in New 

fork City. They have two children, 

teenagers Alice Marylyn and Reynolds 

7 ord. 

When he isn't busy with his announc- 
lg duties and his activities as head of 
r ord Bond Productions (transcribed 
radio programs), Bond is occupied with 
politics. A long-time friend of Thomas 
Dewey, Governor of New York, he 
las served as radio and television di- 
rector of all of Dewey's Republican 
"•arty campaigns. 




New finer Mum- 
more effective lon cfer! 

Now contains amazing new ingredient M-3 that 
protects underarms against odor-causing bacteria 



When you're close to the favorite man in 
your life, be sure you stay nice to be 
near. Guard against underarm odor this 
new, better way! 

Better, longer protection. Yes, new Mum 
with M-3 protects against bacteria that 
cause underarm odor. Doesn't give odor 
a chance to start. 

Softer, creamier new MUM smooths on 
easily, doesn't cake. Gentle— contains no 
harsh ingredients. Will not rot or discolor 
finest fabrics. 

mum's delicate new fragrance was cre- 
ated for Mum alone. And gentle new 
Mum contains no water to dry out or de- 
crease its efficiency. No waste, no shrink- 
age—a jar lasts and lasts! 



4m 




New MUM cream deodorant 

A Product of Bristol-Myers 

Build up protection with new Mini! 
Mum with M-3 not only stops growth of 
odor-causing bacteria — but keeps down 
future bacteria growth. Yes, you actually 
build up protection with regular exclu- 
sive use of new Mum ! Now at your cos- 
metic counter. 



R 

■ 







ose quiz 



kid 



s 



Presenting the Quiz Kids 

as good — and as bad as any other kids in 
town — living proof that itfs 
fun to be smart 




Mike Mullin, thirteen, the bring-em-back-alive 
Quiz Kid, instructs Melvin Miles and Harvey Dytch 
in the safe handling of this five-foot fox snake. 
Mike captured the snake on a recent camping trip. 

Halloween is still just Halloween, whether you're 
a Quiz Kid or not. (r) Frankie Vander Ploeg, Pat 
C onion, Sally Ann Wilhelm, Lonny Dunde, Melvin 
Miles and Joe Kelly join in the costume party. 



■ For the past decade, listeners to the popular NBC radio show 
have pictured a Quiz Kid as a bespectacled little monster isolated 
from the mischief and fun of a normal childhood. In vain, Chief 
Quizzer Joe Kelly insisted this was untrue — that such a sad crea- 
ture would be as big a flop on the program as he was in real life — 
but the public refused to believe him. 

Today that impression is due to change. With the show entirely 
converted to TV, it becomes obvious to viewers that the typical 
Quiz Kid has charm as well as intelligence. He's a child who gets 
along well with others, who applies his learning to everyday situa- 
tions, and who has as much fun, if not more, than the average child. 

The Quiz Kids are on NBC-TV, Friday at 8 P.M., EDT for Alka Seltzer. 



Twelve-year-old Naomi 
Cooks plays a perfect Juliet 
to John Carradine's Romeo — 
and without any rehearsal! 



s ^mf^HT 



Melvin Miles, seven, may be scared to death 
of Bob Cavenaugh's educated mare, but he'd 
never show it. In fact, he's disappointed 
because the horse couldn't replace the tie. 



w - 



I to 



takes a lot more than a 

wphone duet with Tex 

leke to phase six-year- 

Frankie Vander Ploeg. 



There was a grin on every 
Quiz Kid face as they were 
invited to board one of the 
original merry Oldsmobiles. 



iel Kupperman proves 
can compute a math prob- 
anywhere — even while 
ting a driving test. 







Brad Phillips, referee of the Singing 
Battle Royal, finds a few spare moments in 

his four-hour WINS stint to prepare 
for his role as both student and professor. 



platter 
spinning 

PROFESSOR 



It was a quiet Sunday morning, and the voice on the radio said, 
"And now, presenting The Singing Battle Royal." This inauspicious 
introduction marked the beginning of one of the most novel of the 
current disc shows, presided over by WINS disc jockey, Brad Phillips. 

For the ordinary man a four-hour tour of duty in a small broadcasting 
booth, particularly on a Sunday, may seem like an interminable period; 
the inexhaustible Mr. Phillips, however, finds that it fits right into his 
schedule. For, in between spinning records and selling everything from 
television sets to trips to Florida, Brad makes up his classwork for the 
following week. Not content with one job, he is also a full-time professor 
at New York University. 

A native New Yorker, thirty-two-year-old Brad Phillips studied dra- 
matic arts at the University of Michigan. When his days at Ann Arbor 
were capped off by the presentation of the usual sheepskin, Brad was 
offered his own program, a fifteen-minute variety show in Detroit. 
Shortly thereafter Brad married. 

With the advent of Pearl Harbor, Brad joined the Marines, seeing 
action at the Saipan invasion, Okinawa and duty in Japan. Returning 
to his family in California, he decided to pull a switch on Mr. Horace 
Greeley and headed east to the lucrative fields of radio and TV. 

In New York he became associated with WQXR as staff announcer and 
did free lance radio and television work. Having appeared in over fifty 
television shows including Studio One, and Kraft Theatre, he set out 
to work on his Masters Degree at tbe N.Y.U. School of Education. 
Upon completion of his degree he was offered a professorship teaching 
radio and television technique. 

In 1948 Brad was assigned as staff announcer on WINS and given 
the disc show he has now made famous. The interesting feature about 
the Battle Royal is that it presents no bands or female singers. Four 
hours of records of the top male singers of the day might sound mo- 
notonous, but present Pulse ratings quickly belie the fact. 

A resident of Bayside, Long Island, Brad has increased his family to 
include four children. The boss of the house, as Brad is the first to 
admit, is Russell, a hearty five-month-old. Not content with his family, 
his announcing chores at WINS, and teaching stint at N. Y. U., the inde- 
fatigable Mr. Phillips is now working toward his doctorate at Columbia. 
When time (?) allows he hies over to the American Theater Wing to 
continue his dramatic courses, for as he claims, "I want to be as versatile 
as possible." It's possible! 



Coming tot Month 




Mary Margaret McBride: 
radio's one and only. 

August has a way of sound- 
ing delightfully drowsy 
"• from this distance and 
you may very well plan 
to make it delightfully 
drowsy. But be sure to 
reserve a place in your 
hammock for the Aug- 
ust Radio Television Mirror. 
There's nothing drowsy 
about it and at the very 
least you'll find it delightful. 
Starting off — and what could 
be a better way — is a story, 
with color pictures plus a 
cover picture, of radio's very 
own first lady, Mary Mar- 
garet McBride. Mary Mar- 
garet from child to celebrity 
with never-before revela- 
tions is a feature no true 
McBride fan will want to 
miss. Sharing the August 
cover with Mary Margaret 
is Gordon MacRae, the Rail- 
road Hour's charming young 
singer. There's a story about 
Gordon, too, of course. It's 
written by his secretary who 
sees her boss from an en- 
tirely different but never- 
theless fascinating view- 
point. Be sure to look for 
it in the August issue of 
Radio Television Mirror. 

* * * 

Have you ever been lone- 
ly, so terribly lonely that 
you wished there were one 
person who could make your 
loneliness just a little easier 
to bear? Well, there is one 
person who has done that 
for countless men she never 
even sees. She's known to 
these men as Lonesome Gal 
and the only way they know 
her is via her late evening 
radio show. You'll find pic- 
tures and a story on this 
unique young woman in 
next month's issue. 

* * * 

Also in August: A Young 
Widder Brown picture story; 
a special section devoted to 
Saturday morning TV 
shows; and an inspirational 
piece by Susan Peters; 
Tommy Bartlett; plus our 
regular features. Remember 
the date — Wednesday, July 
11. Happy hammocking! 




t2 TA 



You, too, could be more charming 

attractive 
popular 

Millions of women have found Odo-Ro-No a sure short cut to pre- 
cious charm. For over 40 years we have conducted hundreds of 
tests on all types of deodorants. We have proved Odo-Ro-No safe- 
guards your charm and attractiveness more effectively than any 
deodorant you have ever used. 

• Odo-Ro-No is the only cream deodorant guaranteed to stop 
perspiration and odor for 24 hours or double your money back." 

• Odo-Ro-No is the deodorant that stays creamy longer— 
never gets gritty, even in open jar. 

• No other cream deodorant is so harmless for fabrics. 

• No other cream deodorant is safer for skin. 

*Double your money back if you, aren't satisfied that new 
Odo-Ro-No Cream is the best deodorant you've ever used. 
Just return unused portion to Northam Warren, New York. 




0D0R0-D0 



CREAM 



GUARANTEED Full 24 Hour Protection 






THE LOLLIPOP SET 



10 




Every Saturday morning at 9:30, the chil- 
dren of Boston receive an invitation from 
WCOP's Voltarine Block to hop aboard the 
"little red wagon painted blue." The Children's 
Songbag, crammed with stories, musical games 
and folk music from all over the world packs 
a studio full of excited small fry. The pro- 
gram gets off to a gay start with audience 
participation in the opening song. Then Vol- 
tarine may read one of the many stories that 
all children love or sing a song that is sung 
in a land across the sea. 



A lovable little fellow, just the size of a 
grape is also on hand to charm the young- 
sters at 10 o'clock Saturday mornings. Created 
and narrated by Robert Warren Katz, the Ad- 
ventures of Professor Teeny, brings its young 
audience tales of a creature even smaller 
than they are who knows what it is like to live 
in a world full of big people. On hand to assist 
in the dramatization are Robert Katz's three 
sons, Bobby, Richard and David, and Miss 
Betty Leary. Katz, himself, now a successful 
attorney, was once an actor. 



Betsy King, ten-year-old disc jockey, starts 
the small fry day on Sundays at 8 A.M. 
with her program Let's Have Fun. For an hour- 
and-a-half Betsy spins the best in recorded 
children's stories and music, injecting her own 
youthful philosophy and chatter, and closing 
with a homespun but appropriate Sunday morn- 
ing prayer. Betsy, who has been on radio since 
the time when she was smaller than the turn- 
tables she uses, spends several hours in the 
WCOP record library each week picking out 
the records she will use. 



IP 



ncle" Ellie Dierdorff, WCOP's chief an- 
nouncer joins the fun on Sunday morn- 
ing too. At 11 :3(Teager youngsters crowd around 
him as he says "Let's sit down and read the 
Boston Globe funnies." The wit of the comics 
sometimes takes a back seat, however, when 
the youngsters visiting the broadcast add their 
own unpredictable humor. All in all, WCOP's 
series of children's shows each weekend — 
which no member of the lollipop set would 
miss — are the answer to a busy Boston mother's 
prayer. 



Does Motherhood 
Change A Woman's 
Life? 



Althea Bigby is fea- 
tured in The Bright- 
er Day, on M-F, 
2:45 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. Sponsored by 
P & G's Ivory Flakes. 




Here are the names of 
those who wrote the best 
letters of advice to Althea 
Bigby in April's daytime 
radio drama problem 



In April Radio Television Mir- 
ror reader-listeners were told 
Althea Bigby's story and asked 
whether motherhood changes a 
woman's life. The editors of Radio 
Television Mirror have chosen the 
best letters and checks have been 
sent to the following: 

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS to 
Mrs. Alfred 0. Williams, Rich- 
land, Michigan for the follow- 
ing letter: 

Dear Althea: 

Each day as I listen to your im- 
prudent remarks to Liz concerning 
your forthcoming offspring, I am 
shocked. But, Althea, believe me, 
your self-pity and husband-hate will 
be completely healed after your lit- 
tle angel arrives. 

Motherhood is the noblest state of 
woman's existence. It erases hatreds, 
warms cold hearts, forgives griev- 
ances, and engenders a sense of real 
responsibility. Love awakens you to 
a higher level of thinking, so you'll 
realize that your child's life,. as a 
worthy citizen of our country, de- 
pends entirely upon the harmonious 
environment you create. 

Althea, dear, I know — I'm a 
mother. 

FIVE DOLLARS each for the 
five next-best letters in answer 
to the problem has been sent to: 

Mrs. Charles Gabel 
Trucksville, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles Kahn 
South Ozone Park, N. Y. 

Mrs. James Truex 
Warsaw, Indiana 

Mrs. Camile S. Harris 
Wynne, Arkansas 

Mrs. Lyle H. Bancroft 
Lansing. Michigan 



U 



I This Common Sense Way | 



=nl 



Sylvia of Hollywood has 
no patience with those 
who say they can't re- 
duce. She says, "A lot of 
women think the beauties 
of the screen and stage 
are the natural born fa- 
vorites of the gods. Let 
me tell you they all have 
to be improved upon be- 
fore they are presented 
to the public. Yes, I 
know, you are going to 
come back at me and say, 
'But look at the money 
they have to spend on 
themselves. It's easy to 
do it with money.' 

"Let me tell you some- 
thing else. I've been rub- 
bing noses with money 
for a good many years 
now. Big money. Buckets 
of it. I've treated many 
moneyed women. But 
money has nothing to do 
with it. In most cases, 
money makes people soft 
used to having things done for them 
and never do anything for themselves." 




Want to be convinced? 
Watch those scales. They 
will talk in pounds. And 
watch that tape measure. 
It will talk in inches. 



They get 



It 



Here Sylvia explains 
what you can do for your- 
self to improve your fig- 
ure. There is nO magic 
about The Common Sense 
Way to a beautiful figure. 
But if you follow the sug- 
gestions Sylvia of Holly- 
wood has for you in this 
book you may, perhaps, 
challenge the beauty of 
the loveliest movie star! 

Sylvia of Hollywood 
Names Names 

Sylvia of Hollywood has 
reduced scores of famous 
stage and screen stars— 
successfully. In this book 
Sylvia tells how she helped 
many of Hollywood's 
brightest stars with their 
figure problems. She names 
names — tells you how she 
developed this star's legs — 
how she reduced that star's 
waistline — how she helped 
another star to achieve a 
beautiful youthful figure. Perhaps your 
own figure problems are identical to 
those of your favorite screen star. 



Partial Contents 
New Edition 

Too Much Hips, Reduc- 
ing Abdomen, Reducing 
the Breasts, Firming the 
Breasts, Fat.FudgyArms, 
Slenderizing the Legs and 
Ankles, Correcting Bow- 
legs, Slimming theThighs 
and Upper Legs, Re- 
ducing Fat on the Back, 
Squeezing Off Fat. En- 
large Your Chest, De- 
velop Your Legs — Off 
with That Double Chin! 
Slenderizing the Face 
and Jowls, Refining Your 
Nose. Advice For The 
Adolescent — The Woman 
Past Forty — The Per- 
sonality Figure, Glamour 
Is Glandular, This Thing 
Called Love, Cure-For- 
The-Blues Department, 
Take a Chance! 



%ml 6ty ecUttott. .. ONLY *1 



A brand new edition of Syl- 
via's famous book, No More 
Alibis is now ready for you. 
This edition contains all the 
text matter of the original 
book, plus the greatest part 
of her splendid book on 
personality development 
entitled, Pull Yourself To- 
gether, Baby! So, in this one 
thrilling edition, you get 
Sylvia's secrets of charm, 
as well as beauty. 
The pages of No More Ali- 
bis are packed to the brim 



with practical instructions 
and the book is illustrated 
with photographs from life. 
All of Sylvia's instructions 
are simple to follow. You 
can carry out Sylvia's sug- 
gestions in the privacy of 
your room. The price of 
this marvelous new edition 
is only $1.00 — and we pay 
the postage! Send for your 
copy today while our sup- 
ply of this new edition is 
still available. 



Bartholomew House, Inc., Dept. RM-751 

205 E. 42nd Street. New York 17. N. Y. 

Send me postpaid a copy of Sylvia of Hollywood's NO 
MORE ALIBIS! COMBINED WITH PULL YOURSELF TO- 
GETHER, BABY! I enclose $1.00. 



Name. . . 
Address. 

City 



Please Print 



State. 




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Jim Hurlbut appears on Zoo Parade 
Sundays at 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC-TV. 



What July 



By 

JIM HURLBUT 

A 1951 newsman's 
version of the biggest 
scoop in our historg 





Means 



I don't suppose I've ever before actually 
stopped to consider just what July the 
4th means to me. And perhaps, that, in 
itself, is significant. There are few coun- 
tries in the world where independence can 
be taken for granted. 

Besides that most obvious point, July 4th 
also means something else to me. It's the 
date of one of the greatest news stories of 
all times — July 4th, 1776. 

What a day that must have been. What 
a day for reporters. Although Thomas 
Jefferson and his colleagues had approved 
the Declaration of Independence on July 
the 2nd, they did it all over again on the 
4th for the benefit of the public. 

I'll wager the legmen for the Philadel- 
phia papers and the regular reporters as- 
signed to the Independence Hall beat would 
gladly have sacrificed all their inalienable 
rights for the privilege of being able to 
utilize, if only for a few hours, all the 
methods of communication available to 
present-day reporters. 

I can just see those knickered newsmen 
roaring out of the meeting room in Inde- 
pendence Hall and dashing for the tele- 
phones. I can see the long banks ot 
telegraph tickers set up in a side room. Jusl 
behind them, long rows of correspondents 
sitting at tables and beating out copy a 
mile-a-minute on clattering typewriters, 
trying to take full advantage of the few 
hours of the visitation of the miracle. All 
of them beating those typewriters like mad. 
All but one. One poor guy I can see in my 
mind's eye is scribbling away with his long 
quill pen. Remember, there's always some- 
one who doesn't get the word. 







And suppose they had radio for a few 
hours. I imagine they'd catch on quickly 
on how to use it. I can see some colonial 
Morgan Beatty pushing his way through the 
meeting room, microphone in hand, trying 
to get to the side of John Hancock for a 
personal interview with the man who signed 
the precious document first. And Mo Beatty 
in knee pants and a powdered wig would 
be quite a sight, believe me. 

Up on the roof, beside a bell tower, I 
can see an enterprising special events man 
— a revolutionary period Len O'Connor — 
who has scaled the slates to pick up the 
sound of that stirring peal to spread it, 
quite literally, the length and breadth of 
the land. The town crier down below looks 
definitely unhappy. 

And television. What a story for tele- 
vision! The television news gentry would 
probably carry it even ahead of a bathing 
suit parade. And that would be a real con- 
cession. But certainly the ceremony in 
ndependence Hall would top even the 

efauver Crime Investigating Committee 
earings as television fare. 

And, when you stop to think about it, 

ere wouldn't be any Kefauver Committee 
f it hadn't been for what happened on 
uly 4th, 1776. Further, in all likelihood 
here wouldn't be any of our modern 
methods of communication. And perhaps 
that's a basic factor in the significance of 
July the fourth. 

Now that I think of it, I'd be willing to 
give up the modern tools of my trade just 
for the inestimable privilege of covering 
that story — just to see the birth of this 
great nation. 



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Who's who 



You've seen or heard Donald Cur- 
tis in all forms of entertainment — 
theater, radio, movies and television — 
but it's television in 

Donald which you have prob- 
Curtis ably grown to know 
and like this tall, 
raw-boned hunk of man. Don was 
the male star of CBS-TV's Detective's 
Wife last summer and has since been 
featured on all the leading TV dra- 
matic programs, such as Studio One, 
Lucky Strike Theater and Big Story. 

Don came to New York in 1947 
after eleven years in Hollywood. An 
ex-professor of dramatics and speech 
at Duquesne University, he turned 
actor when granted a Rockefeller 
Foundation Fellowship. 

Married to TV agent Helen Keane, 
Don plans to try directing soon. 





Julia 
Meade 



"A girl doesn't have to wear a 
plunging neckline to keep her popu- 
larity rating from taking a dive in 
the same direction," 
says Dennis James 
in referring to Julia 
Meade. The James 
formula of conservatism has paid off 
well for his Gal Friday, who looks 
and acts like a Vassar co-ed. The 
James-Meade combo is now going 
into its third year on Okay Mother. 
Julia, twenty-four, blonde and 
slim, was plucked from the cover girl 
profession when Dennis spied her 
photo in a magazine. "To me, Julia 
looked the part of the proverbial girl 
next door and the exact type I wanted 
for my show," recalls Dennis. His 
legions seem to agree one hundred 
percent. 






Debonair Vinton Hayworth has 
played everything — from "con" man 
to irate husband to lover on shows 
such as Kraft Thea- 
Yinton ter, Circle Theater, 
Hayuvorth Studio One and Pu- 
litzer Prize Play- 
house, to mention just a few. 

Although he is still remembered 
as Jack Arnold of Myrt and Marge 
radio days, very few people know 
that Vinton was one of the real 
pioneers in television. In 1930, Mr. 
Hayworth produced and directed the 
second dramatic show ever attempted 
< on television, over WMAQ in Chi- 
cago, with Ireene Wicker as his star. 

Vinton was around and ready 
when television came out of war 
storage in 1945, and has been turning 
in prizewinning portrayals ever since. 




The name of Hank Sylvern goes 
all the way back to the early days 
of radio when he used to appear on 
WINS as the Phan- 
Ilttiili torn Organist. More 
Sylvern recently, Hank Syl- 
vern has come to the 
foreground as musical director on 
the Sam Levenson Show. Hank also 
arranges music for The Melodeers, 
vocal group featured on the same 
program. Although the fact is not so 
well known, Sylvern guides the des- 
tinies of many vocal groups includ- 
ing The Playboys Quartet which pro- 
duced Alfred Drake. 

When Hank isn't supplying musical 
background for Suspense, This Is 
Show Business and other programs, 
he's penning music for the World 
Concert Orchestra. 



/ 




'JvpsW 



Can't Melt! 
Can't Smear! 





MARY ELLEN KAY-in 

Rodeo King & the Senor- 
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WATCH ME ! 

I'M THE RUG-A-BOO! I'M GOING TO TRAMP 
THOSE CRUMBS RIGHT INTO THE RUG-AND 
STAIN IT BEFORE SHE VACUUMS TOMORROW! 




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POETRY 



ROBERT 

Robert's lazy, so they say: 
Robert dreams the livelong day 
Robert's apt to run away 
When there's scrubbing, errand-running, 
Woodbox-filling, baby sunning 

Deep within a forest glade 

Robert lies in dappled shade; 

Sees the river's swift cascade — 

Rainbow waters downward falling — 
Never hears the school bell ringing. 

Intimately Robert knows 
How the chipmunk comes and goes, 
How the willow sprouts and grows, 
Gnarl of root and blade a-greening, 
Mackeral sky and bluejay's preening 



THE INVASION 

Summer is never fully fledged 
Till the hollyhocks come down. 
Tall and spiked and crinkle-edged. 
Like an army on the town! 
Looking south and looking north. 
East and westward, too, the eye 
Sees peduncles putting forth 
White as if to mollify 
Flaming scarlet, deep maroon. 
Cream and lemon, salmon, rose — 
Till someone must comment soon, 
"I declare, but that weed grows!" 
— Elaine Emans 



CALLISTA 

Callista said the sun was bright 
Though the day was gray as gray 
Callista said the world was good 
And filled us with dismay. 
Callista heard the night wind call 
When not a breeze had stirred 
We listened, but the cricket's chirp 
Was all the sound we heard. 
Callista curls her shining hair 
And wears a dainty glove 
And grandma says it seems to her 
Callista is in love. 

— Mary McMillin 



RAIN 

A kind of guilt creeps on me as rain blows round the eaves 

And wind capriciously turns up the silver backs of leaves; 

For I am glad within me, while other folk contend 

That they fee] like the weather, and would the storm but end 

Their spirits, too would waken and soar toward the sun, 

So should I speak and have them think me quite the foolish one — 

For I delight in twisted twigs — determined drops of rain — 

And clouds that huddle up and pout before they cry again. 

I like the muted murmur of a rain-enshrouded wood, 

The bowing-down of grasses which so proud and straight had stood; 

I like the touch of bark and bough blackened by the rain, 

The pert I-told-you-so expression of the saucy weathervane. 

I like the ruminating cows, resigned to wet and chill 

Standing 'neath an orchard tree, so patiently and still. 

Should I be thinking lovely thoughts when rain begins to fall, 

Or hide within a cloak of gloom and think no thoughts at all. 

— Betty Butler 



One day Robert will arise, 
Be a man in soul and size, 
Peace and wisdom in his eyes: 
Then they'll say in some surprise, 
"How came he so wondrous wise?" 

— Marietta Sharp 






RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR WILL PAY FIVE DOLLARS 

for the best originaLpoems sent in each month by readers. Limit 
poems to 30 lines, address to Poetry, Radio Television Mirror 
Magazine, 205 E. 42 Street, New York 17, New York. Each poem 
should be accompanied by this notice. When postage is enclosed, 
every effort will be made to return unused manuscripts. This is 
not a contest, but an effort to purchase poetry for use in Radio 
Television Mirror. 







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Information 



Booth 



Ask your questions — 
we'll try to find the answers 



Early start 

Dear Editor : 

Can you please tell me how old John 
Conte is and how long he has been 
singing? M.B., Detroit, Mich. 

John Conte was born in Palmer, Mass- 
achusetts in 1915. His singing lessons be- 
gan in grade school and before he was 
twenty-one he had his own musical pro- 
gram on the West Coast. Since then he 
has been singing in Broadway musicals, 
nightclubs, and now is the host of NBC- 
TV's Little Show. 

Marital status 

Dear Editor : 

Would you please print a picture of 
James Melton. Is he married, and does 
he have any children? Their names? 

Mrs T. C. H., Youngsville, N. C. 

James Melton is married to the former 
Marjorie McClure. They have one daugh- 
ter, Margot. Melton was born in Georgia 
in 1904 and sang with the Metropolitan 
Opera before his present TV assignment 
on Ford Festival. 

Lion tamer 

Dear Editor : 

I would like to see a picture of Clyde 
Beatty. Where was he born and does he 
have any children? 

Miss D.R.O., Portland, Oregon 

Clyde Beatty was born in Bainbridge, 



Ohio, on June 10, 1903. He and his wife, 
Harriet, have one child, Albina. At pres- 
ent his home is on the West Coast, 
but he may be heard on Monday, Wed- 
nesday, and Friday at 5:30 P.M. EDT, 
over MBS. 

Correction, please 

Dear Editor: 

I have just finished reading your April 
issue and notice that you say Galen Drake 
is a bachelor. Will you check on this for 
me as the other day he mentioned having 
a daughter. Mrs. E.N.R., Flushing, N.Y. 

Our mistake — as you and many other 
attentive readers have pointed out. Galen 
Drake is married, to the former Anne 
Peron, a professional model. They have 
one daughter, Linda Anne. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y. We'll answer if we 
can either in Information Booth or by mail 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter along with a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope, and specify whether your ques- 
tion concerns radio or TV. 




James Melton Clyde Beatty John Conte 



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IF YOU'RE A VICTIM OF FIVE 
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steer clear of Poplar Bluff, Mis- 
souri. There, the law forbids 
shaving during the day. 

READER'S OWN VERSE— 

Dietmission 

Mary Jane and Betty Jo, 
Peggy, Sue and Beth . . . 
Looking for new recipes 
On how to starve to death! 

— June Brown Harris 






d 



ana some-sense 



LOOK BOTH WAYS ITEM: 

The Fourth of July holiday al- 
ways brings a rise in traffic fa- 
talities. If you can, stay home. 
If you can't, be careful. Make it 
a safe and sane Fourth all the 
way around. 



Note for Sunday: 

Of all the Presidents of the 
United States, from Washington 
through Truman, two were Bap- 
tists, one Congregationalist, nine 
Episcopalians, one Quaker, four 
Methodists, five Presbyterians, 
two Reformed Dutch, four Uni- 
tarians, and four did not belong 
to any denomination. 




20 




JULY 

— the month in which silence 
takes a holiday. When I was a 
kid, if you had the urge — and 
the money — you went to the cor- 
ner store and bought as many 
firecrackers, sons-o'-guns, smoke 
bombs and other semi-lethal 
weapons as you wished. Nowa- 
days you can't go to the corner 
store and buy such delights. But 
it's a funny thing — for some 
reason only kids understand, 
the neighborhood still rings, for 
days in advance, with explo- 
sions. Can't figure it out. Neither, 
come to think of it, can the local 
dogs. Pooches don't like fire- 
works any more than they like 
thunder, and comes the thunder 
of the Fourth many an other- 
wise intrepid tail-wagger will be 
found under the bed or in the 
far reaches of the broom closet 
vowing he'll never chase the 
neighbor's cat again if only al- 
lowed to live through this day. 
. . . Weather aspects of July 
look to be just what one might 
expect: heat in large quantities. 
"Wear a hat or an awning, 
afternoon, evening, night or 
morning," advises our good 
friend and companion, The Old 
Farmer's Almanac, regarding 
the early part of the month. 
Later, a bit more cheerfully: 
"Days are hot, nights are not." 
But just to make sure you aren't 
too cheered, the OF A throws in 
a date-to-remember item, casu- 
ally reminding us that in 1913, 
on the 10th of July, a tempera- 
ture of 134 degrees Fahrenheit 
was recorded in Death Valley. 
Phew — pass me my palm leaf 
and a bucket of lemonade, 
please ! 



Art Linkletter emcees House Party, 
Monday through Friday at 3:30 P.M. 
EDT, Columbia Broadcasting System; 
sponsored by Pillsbury Mills. Life 
With Linkletter is seen Friday at 
7:30 P.M. EDT over the American 
Broadcasting System's Television 
Network : sponsored by Green Giant. 



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A LITTLE LEARNING- 
LIBERTY BELL DIVISION: 

You all know, of course, that 
the Liberty Bell is on display — 
so visitors may touch it if they 
wish — in Independence Hall in 
Philadelphia. But do you know 
how long it's been there? And 
how it came to get that crack? 
Seems the bell was first cast in 
London, to celebrate the 50th 
Anniversary of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. It ar- 
rived in August of 1752, cracked 
while being tested. Recast, it 
was placed in the State House 
in June of the following year. 
Once again when the bell was 
tested it cracked, and this time 
it was broken up and recast 
completely, using the same 
metal plus some extra copper to 
see if the brittleness couldn't be 
cut down. Always brittle, 
though, the bell got its present 
crack in 1835 when tolled for 
the funeral procession of Chief 
Justice John Marshall. Mean- 
while, in September 1777, it 
was removed from the State 
House when it became apparent 
that the British were coming 
into Philadelphia. In a supply 
train of seven hundred wagons 
it was taken, along with Army 
baggage, to Allentown, where 
it was hidden in Zion's Church. 
In June of the following year it 
was returned to Philadelphia 
where it's been ever since, ex- 
cept for brief journeys on loan 
to exhibitions and expositions. 
On D-Day, June 6, 1944, the 
bell sounded again — not tolled, 
but struck with a rubber mallet 
— on two radio broadcasts. 

IT HAPPENED ON 
HOUSEPARTY— 

Linkletter (to little girl) : And 
where do you live, honey? 
Little girl: With my Mommy 
and Daddy. 

Linkletter: Yes, but where do 
Mommy and Daddy live? 
Little girl: With me! 





'V* 



FUN AND GAMES— 

Young kids aren't hard to get 
started on games, but sometimes 
a party of "middle-aged" young- 
sters dies on its feet. Here's a 
game that's silly enough to get 
any group laughing. It's called 
"Barnyard," and the equipment 
is simple — as many kids as you 
happen to have around at the 
moment, and a flock of peanuts. 
(The equipment the kids need, 
they come with — good, strong 
vocal cords.) Before festivities 
get under way, hide as many pea- 
nuts as you see fit around the 
house. When the youngsters get 
there, give each one the name of 
an animal — cow, donkey, cat, 
etc., Scatter the kids to find the 
peanuts, with the added provision 
that whenever one of them finds 
a peanut he must make the noise 
of his animal — moo like a cow, 
bray like a donkey, and so on. 
Of course, there's a prize for the 
one who finds the most peanuts, 
and another for the one who 
gives the most realistic animal 
imitation. (Better limit the time 
or the peanuts on this — how the 
neighbors will hate you ! ) 



READER'S OWN VERSE— 

The Pie-Eyed Piper 

The piper piped the kiddies 
From Hamelin, so they say. 

In pinafores and middies 
They followed him away. 

And did he live in clover, 
Thereafter? He did not, 

For once the trip was over, 
Unhappy was his lot! 

The children clung like cactus, 
And though the tots were cute, k 

He had no time to practice — 
He had to flout his flute! 

He'd been a virtuoso, 
But now, upset by wails, 

His trills were only so-so; 
He often fluffed his scales. 

He wished he hadn't swiped 'em, f 
And so, one summer day, 

Back to town he piped 'em 
And sighing, stole away! 

— Ernestine Cobern Beyer 




fl 1 



W: 




R 

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ik 



It may be music to the 
rest of the Shaw family, 
but to little Sandra Lee 
it's just so much noise. 




STAY UP STAN 




R 

M 



WCBS's Stan Shaw shows how 
all-night disc jockeys do it — 
thanks to that cup of coffee. 



Stan Shaw, whose all-night record show has been something of 
an institution with New York insomniacs, night workers and stay- 
up-lates, now has a new nightly series of music and informal 
chatter over Station WCBS Monday through Friday at 11 :15 P.M., and 
on Saturday at 11 :30 P.M. 

Shaw also answers to the names of "Your Very Good Friend, the 
Milkman" and "Stay Up Stan, the Record Man," two titles he had 
registered while conducting the country's first commercially success- 
ful all-night radio show. During the program's run of seven years, 
he was on the air every night from 2:00 to 7:00 A.M. 

Born in Kansas City, Missouri, Shaw was raised on several of the 
nine ranches owned by his father. He received his early education 
in Missouri, and later attended the University of Idaho, where he was 
leader of the school band. He worked his way through the University 
by organizing touring bands, and made enough money to come east. 

He landed his first radio job in 1925 with a Newark, New Jersey, 
station and estimates he's been on the air a total of 50,342 hours since 
that time. He worked in Chicago, Baltimore and Washington radio 
stations, in a variety of capacities. Then followed a coast-to-coast tour 
with the Play Arts Guild, acting and producing stage plays. 

He returned to New York in 1934, and shortly after began his 
all-night record stint, one of radio's most successful "experiments." 
During his seven years on the show, he got 150 to 250 telegrams each 
night, requesting tunes. At the time, one of the national wire services 
noted that he had received more telegrams than any living individual. 

He also was cited by the police departments of several cities for 
his assistance in locating lost persons, apprehending criminals and 
preventing several suicides. 

Shaw's radio career almost came to a sudden end a few years ago 
when he fell asleep, exhausted, under a sun lamp for six hours, and 
ended up in a hospital for six weeks. 

Shaw is married to the former Jean Dodson, who was one of the 
country's top models for several years. They have two children. 



22 






. 



Stores carrying the 
mother and daughter 
sailor dresses on 
page 50 

W. Filene's Sons Co. 
Boston, Mass. 

Titche-Goettinger Co. 
Dallas, Texas 

Bitker, Gerner Co. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Stores carrying the 
mother and daughter 
pfaysuit on page 51 

Bitker, Gerner Co. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Joseph Home Co. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Schultz & Co. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 

Gimbel Bros. 
New York, N. Y. 



1951 POLIO POINTERS 



•gfgk 



DON'T 

MIX WITH NEW GROUPS 




*o*' 



■S&s- 









fen 



RECOMMENDED BY THE NATIONAL 
FOUNDATION FOR INFANTILE PARALYSIS 



The above polio pointers are 
excellent reminders as to what 
precautions should be taken dur- 
ing summer months — the months 
when polio is most prevalent. 



Can a husband ever tell a 




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If only she'd realize the wonderful 
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anly charm, married happiness and after 
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Why You Should Use ZONITE 

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23 



MAN 



about 

MIDNIGHT 



Tall, lanky John Lascelles is currently prov- 
ing the inaccuracy of the widely held belief 
that "nobody listens to the radio at midnight." 
As WGR's Man About Midnight, Lascelles has 
a Pulse rating at midnight that many radio peo- 
ple would settle for at high noon. An expert at 
friendly small talk, he is excellent company for 
Buffalo's night owls. And John Lascelles has 
had adventures enough to last him for many 
years of big or small talk. 

Shortly after John joined WGR the Army 
called him to see the world, and off he went to 
Africa, Egypt, Italy, France and Germany — a 
three-year tour of the Continent. Near the end of 
the war John was conducting a three-hour 
morning record show on the Fifth Army radio 
station in Foggia, Italy. Code-named The Great 
Speckled Bird, John developed a huge follow- 
ing of GI's and native Italians. Although he 
would probably deny being a sentimentalist, 
John still has a scrapbook of letters and cards 
from his wartime listeners. 

Back at WGR since his discharge from the 
Army, John has two other shows as well as his 
midnight stint. A good chunk of the Buffalo pop- 
ulation looks forward to his 6:30 show, which 
finds John jawing with top vocalist Elvera, and 
with members of Dave Cheskin's orchestra. He 
is also responsible for the 3:30 to 4 P.M. seg- 
ment of the Saturday afternoon Bandstand Cara- 
van, a new record show teaming him with 
colleagues Warren Kelly, Billy Keaton and 
Bob Glacy. Besides all this, John proves his 
versatility by handling WGR newscasts as 
competently as he handles the patter on his other 
shows. 

Now having had enough of travel, John has 
settled quite conclusively, buying a home in 
Ridgeway, Ontario, just over the border from 
Buffalo. The house is located on Lake Erie, 
ideal for John's top hobby, sailing. It will also 
be fine for the cruiser he plans to buy this 
summer. Sailboat or cruiser, it looks like smooth 
sailing for a long while for WGR's Man About 
Midnight. 




WGR's John Lascelles, also known to his many 

fans as "The Basket of Bones" or the more familiar 

name of just "OP Bones," rides his records 

on through the witching hour of the Buffalo night. 



R 
M 



24 



RADIO 
TELEVISION 
MIRROR tor 

BETTER LiViNG 



By TERRY BURTON 



A recent Family Counselor guest, Mrs. Mary Ellen Goodman, did a wonder- 
ful thing for her community of White Plains, New York. She organized a 
much-needed, reliable baby sitting service — Sitters Service, Inc. Consulting 
with the National Safety Council, teachers, doctors, and PTA's, she learned that 
there was remarkably little understanding of "good" baby sitting. 

Mrs. Goodman gives her sitters general information on the proper way to take 
care of children, but she emphasized that it's actually up to the parents to supply 
all pertinent material about their children to the sitter. 

The first thing Mrs. Goodman told our listeners was : "Too many parents make 
the mistake of telling their sitter to come at the same hour that they want to 
leave. This is completely wrong. The sitter should arrive at least twenty minutes 
before the parents leave so as to have plenty of time to get acquainted with the 
child and to receive all instructions about what they are to do in the parents' 
absence." 

When I asked Mrs. Goodman specifically what parents should tell the sitters, 
she gave us the following suggestions : "Make sure the sitter knows how and where 
to reach you or someone in your family, how to reach your doctor, the police and 
the fire department. In addition, show her the back entrance to the house in case 
a fire breaks out in the front. It's also a good idea if she knows exactly where 
the phone is located, so that there will be no delay in case she has to make an 
emergency call. 

"H a sitter is called upon to feed the child, she should be given full details as 
to just what and how much the child should be given to eat. Above all, a sitter 
should never be allowed to give medicine to a child until she has had written 
directions from either the child's doctor or parents." 

Mrs, Goodman's Sitters Service, Inc., has proved to be a most successful busi- 
ness venture. She has forty well-trained sitters working for her, and she finds 
that she could use many more. 

Says Mrs. Goodman, "More of these services could and should be organized 
throughout the country. And mothers who are interested will find that their local 
PTA, doctors and clubs will be most eager to back them up. I know they offered 
me a tremendous amount of help and encouragement." 




selecting a 

SITTER 



A sitter should get to know 
child before the parents 
says Mary Goodman (r) . 




Wednesday is Family Counselor Day on the Second Mrs. Burton, heard 
M-F at 2 P.M. EDT over CBS stations. Sponsor: General Foods. 




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R 
H 



25 



RECOMMENDED PROGRAMS 

This list is comprised of current net- 
work TV programs that are wisely in- 
structional and suitable entertainment for 
the average child, or both. More adult 
dramatic and musical programs have not 
been included. While such programs are 
frequently informative and are often re- 
ported as bringing the family closer to- 
gether (such as The Aldrich Family), the 
intellectual and moral standards of most 
dramatic programs are too inconsistent 
from week to week to qualify them for a 
permanent place in a list of desirable 
children's TV fare. 
AGES THREE to EIGHT 
Monday-Friday 

Lucky Pup (CBS-TV) 

TV Baby Sitter (DuMont) 

Howdy Doody (NBC-TV) 

Kukla, Fran & Ollie (NBC-TV) 

Small Fry Club (DuMont) 

Magic Cottage (DuMont) 
Gabby Hayes Show (NBC-TV, Mon., Wed., 

Fri.) 
Panhandle Pete & Jennifer (NBC-TV, 

Tues., Thurs.) 
Ozmoe (ABC-TV, Tues., Thurs.) 
Mary Hartline Show (ABC-TV, Wed.) 
Half-Pint Party (ABC-TV, Thurs.) 
The Big Top (CBS-TV, Sat.) 
Super Circus (ABC-TV, Sun.) 
Zoo Parade (NBC-TV, Sun.) 
Mr. I. Magination (CBS-TV, Sun.) 
AGES NINE to FIFTEEN 
Monday-Friday 

Kukla, Fran & Ollie (NBC-TV) 

Camel News Caravan (NBC-TV) 

Captain Video (DuMont) 

Jimmy Blaine's Junior Edition (ABC- 
TV) 
Space Cadet (ABC-TV, Mon, Wed., Fri.) 
Paul Winchell & Jerry Mahoney (NBC- 
TV, Mon.) 
Going Places With Betty Betz (ABC-TV, 

Tues.) 
Mr. Wizard (NBC-TV, Sat.) 
The Nature of Things (NBC-TV, Sat.) 
You're On Your Own (DuMont, Sun.) 
Mr. I. Magination (CBS-TV, Sun.) 
Battle Report, Washington (NBC-TV, 

Sun.) 
Stars Are Born (DuMont, Sun.) 
Meet The Press (NBC-TV, Sun.) 
Mrs. Roosevelt Meets The Public (NBC- 
TV, Sun.) 
American Forum Of The Air (NBC-TV, 

Sun.) 
Zoo Parade (NBC-TV, Sun.) 
Super Circus (ABC-TV, Sun.) 
Mama (CBS-TV, Fri.) 
The Quiz Kids (NBC-TV, Fri.) 

*Only very limited viewing of Western 
films is encouraged. Those made express- 
ly for TV (Gene Autry programs and The 
Lone Ranger) are generally more suitable 
than those originally produced for motion 
picture theaters. Schedules of these pro- 
grams vary in practically every city. 



No one doubts the medium is here to stay 



Television 

for 
children 



Ft 
M 



BY WILLIAM PARKER 

Writer, editor, television columnist 



• A few weeks ago, 
screams from my 
small daughter's 
bedroom at mid- 
night got me out of 
bed and on the run. 
She was having a 
bad dream about 
"that man on the 
television." Earlier 
in the evening she'd 
insisted on watching 
another chapter of a 
mystery serial — I 
remembered a scene 
showing a kidnap- 
per dragging a little 
girl by the arm toward a waiting car. And the camera 
had even generously provided us with a closeup of 
the child's horror-stricken face just as the curtain 
came down at the end of that night's chapter. That 
was also the night the curtain came down on that 
program in our household for good. But I knew that 
such a step is only partially effectual in helping elim- 
inate the bad effects of certain television programs. 
The next day, I phoned an acquaintance of mine 
who is in charge of programming at the station which 
presents that particular program. 

"Isn't there some kind of law or code forbidding 
horror stories about kidnappers on TV?" I asked. 

"Not yet," he retorted. "Television isn't censored. 
It's up to the networks and program producers to 
put on whatever they wish." 

I hung up the phone but said to myself it isn't 
just the responsibility of the networks or program 
producers — it's up to us, you and me, what we're 
going to let our children see on television. 

Undeniably, there are many great and wonderful 
things about having television in your home for your 
children — benefits for every age group. For the 
tiniest of tots there's the value of seeing how people 
talk and act in society outside the home. Teen-agers 
know more about the world and its politics than 
ever before. They don't spend as much time hanging 
around the corner drugstore on Saturday afternoons 
— it's more exciting at home when they can sit in 
their living rooms and see Notre Dame five yards 
away from the goal line. 

Admitted there are a number of good programs 
that help children in their school work and help 



26 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR, JULY 1951 



i 






-here's what you can do to make it better 



them to enjoy their reading more, but the question 
is — do children ever see them, or are they too busy 
watching the harmful ones? Mr. I. Magination has 
dramatized stories like Huckleberry Finn, Rip Van 
Winkle, and Captain Kidd. And the Ford Theatre has 
presented an hour-long excellent condensation of 
Alice In W onderland. But before a child will watch 
programs like these, some parent has 
to read the program listings in the 
daily paper and make sure the set is 
on at the right time and channel. 

Children from seven to fifteen years 
old are now spending an average of 
three hours a day watching TV indiscriminately. This 
certainly shows the need of applying the old adage: 
"There's a time for everything." According to a poll 
of six hundred and seventy-five school children in 
Washington, D. C, all report spending less time out 
of doors since they have TV. Over half report eating 
their evening meals before the TV set most of the 
time, and countless others are gulping down food to 
rush back to TV. With such examples of poor diges- 
tion and little outdoor exercise and fresh air, it's 
easy to foresee a future generation of human potted 
plants, content to only sit and watch. 

This "time for everything" rule pops up again at 
bedtime when children throw temper tantrums and 
insist on staying up. (Continued on page 81) 










IHiinlMTMi i i iiimV 



The 
pleasure 

to 1 

present 







28 





Showman meets 
showman: Rudy 
Vallee, among 
other big-name 
entertainers, 
made his TV debut 
on Ed's shoiv. 

Margaret Truman 
also made her 
TV debut on 
Toast, asked Ed 
that there be 
no reference to her 
father's job. 

TV's a timetaker 
but Ed still 
manages his 
Broadway column. 
Lower right, 
with Peggy Lee, 
a Toast guest. 



Pennsylvania Avenue, 
Sunset Boulevard, 
Broadway — from thest 
streets the host 
of the town draws his 
glittering guests 




WHEN Oliver Basselin, a French poet 
living in Vaux-de-vire, France, 
gave the name of "vaudeville" to the 
variety show, he really started some- 
thing. Vaudeville never has died. 

Perhaps it was a bit of prophecy that 
Oscar Hammerstein II appeared with 
Richard Rodgers on my first CBS-TV 
presentation of Toast of the Town. The 
original Oscar Hammerstein, his grand- 
father, proved the long life and resil- 
iency of the vaudeville format at Ham- 
merstein's Victoria Theatre in Times 
Square. Four blocks distant, at 39th 
Street and Sixth Avenue, I've proved 
the continuing public appeal of vaude- 
ville in three years of TV weekly shows 
— and vaudeville shows still are the top 
shows in TV ratings all over the coun- 
try. 

Our vaudeville is a streamlined ver- 
sion of the variety shows which Grand- 
father Oscar Hammerstein featured at 
his famous Victoria but basically it's the 
same thing — opera singers, ballerinas. 
comedians, animal acts, attractions that 
become celebrated on "page one," dra- 
matic sketches, celebs in the audience, 
dancers, acrobats — the formula is sure- 
fire. 

My first TV variety show, in June 28, 
1948, set a pattern for top-notch vaude- 
ville that we have consistently followed. 
There were Rodgers and Hammerstein, 
Martin and Lewis, Monica 
Lewis, ballerina Kathryn 
Lee, and Eugene List, the 
ex-GI pianist who played 
for FDR, Stalin and 
Churchill at Potsdam. At 
that time we had a total of 
$1,500 to cover all expenses 
budget $9,000 a week for talent alone. 
At that time we had half a million re- 
ceivers tuned in. Today we have five 
times as. many. Does anyone care to 
argue that vaudeville is dead or dying? 

The stars who have made their TV 
debut on Toast of the Town read like 
the "Who's Who" of show business. We 
have had Bob Hope, Lena Home. 
George Raft, (Continued on page 80) 



Toast of the Town: Sun., 8 P.M., EDT, CBS- 
TV. Sponsored by Lincoln-Mercury Dealers. 



BY 
ED 
SULLIVAN 

Today we 



29 



BY GLADYS HALL 



/**" 







fe, 



MRS. SID has only one complaint 
to make about life with TV's 
mighty Caesar — and this is it. I quote: 

"People think I am the inspiration, 
if that's what you want to call it, for 
the typical average husband-wife 
sketches Sid and Imogene do on Your 
Show of Shows. Women actually ask 
me, 'Do you really put one olive in a 
gallon jug and keep it in the ice-box?' 
They want to know whether Sid got his 
take-off on a woman dressing in the 
morning from watching me. Whether 
quarrels between Sid and me are the 
basis for the husband and wife battles 
Sid and Imogene stage for the cameras. 

"It's absurd. The olive in the gallon 
jug, for instance. An olive — for Sid? 
Why, he'd eat it jar and all! He has 
a tremendous appetite. He can eat a 
whole chicken at one time. For lunch 
today, he put away a big turkey leg, 
breast, wing and the neck! For 
breakfast he has grapefruit juice, 
specially squeezed (by me — I'm the 
family cook), two eggs, a pile of stale 
toast. He goes for stale bread. Let a 
fresh loaf come into the house and he 
takes out several pieces, puts them 
in a bag, puts the bag on- top of the 
ice-box where it stays until the bread 
turns to asphalt. He sometimes 'goes 
on kicks,' as he puts it, about food. 
For days at a time— four, five times 
a day, it will be yogurt. Then steaks. 
Then he can't look at a dish of yogurt 
or a piece of steak. Right now, the 
big kick is rice. Rice for breakfast, 
lunch, dinner (Continued on page 88) 



Your Show of Shows, with 
Sid Caesar, is telecast Sat- 
urdays, 9 P.M. EDT, NBC- 
TV. Participating sponsors. 




id Caesar and family: the private life of a 



public hero 



hoadliner 1 1 at hpmo 




31 



tfl 



■ 



i 







I 







Ss 



*^ 



i 




•■ 



BY GLADYS HALL 

MRS. siD has only one complaint 
to make about life with TV's 
mighty Caesar — and this is it. I quote: 

"People think I am the inspiration, 
if that's what you want to rail il, for 
the typical average husband-wife 
sketches Sid and Imogene do on Your 
Show of Shows. Wonjen actually ask 
me, 'Do you really put one olive in a 
gallon jug and keep it in the ice-box?' 
They want to know whether Sid got his 
take-off on a woman dressing in the 
morning from watching me. Whether 
quarrels between Sid and me arc the 
basis for the husband and wife battles 
Sid and Imogene stage for the cameras. 

"It's absurd. The olive in the gallon 
jug, for instance. An olive — for Sid? 
Why, he'd eat it jar and all! He has 
a tremendous appetite. He can eat a 
whole chicken at one time. For lunch 
today, he put away a big turkey leg, 
breast, wing and the neck! I'm 
breakfast he has grapefruit jinn. 
specially squeezed (by me I'm the 
family cook), two egf^s. a pile of stale 
toast. He goes for stale bread. Let a 
fresh loaf come into the house and he 
takes out several pieces, puts them 
in a bag, puts the bag on* top of the 
ice-box where it stays until the bread 
turns to asphalt. He sometimes 

on kicks,' as he puts it, about f I 

For days at a time — four, five times 
a day, it will be yogurt. Then steaks. 
Then he can't look at a dish of yogurt 
or a piece of steak. Right now, the 
big kick is rice. Rice for breakfast, 
lunch, dinner (Continued on page 88) 



Your Show (if Shows, with 
Sid Caesar, is telecast Sat- 
urdays, 9 P.M. EDT, NBC- 
TV. Participating sponsors. 




*»d Caesar and family: the private life of a 



public hero 



hvaillinvr ■ «> homv 






31 





Happily ever afte\ 



BY JUDITH FIELD 

No ONE feels sorrier about the marital troubles of 
Young Dr. Malone than twenty-eight-year-old Sandy 
Becker, who plays the role five days a week over CBS. 

That's because Sandy has what Jerry Malone is losing — 
a happy marriage and a home echoing with the hubbub 
of growing children. And a good bit of hubbub it is, with 
six-year-old Joyce and two-year-old Curtis joined now by 
Annelle, who was born six months ago. 

Yet, back in 1942, when Ruth 
Venable and Sandy Becker got mar- 
ried, the odds in their favor looked 
slim. They had eloped after knowing 
each other exactly a month; they 
were both only twenty years old. In 
addition, their elopement was a 
secret. Although a formal church 
wedding took place four weeks later, 
Ruth told her parents nothing about 
the first ceremony until several years 
had gone by. 

Gravely, Sandy admits: "We were 
very lucky. It could have been a 
horrible mistake. Something as seri- 
ous as marriage should be discussed 
with parents, should take place be- 
tween two people who know each 
other well. All that an elopement and 
a secret marriage accomplishes is to 
give you a well-deserved feeling of 
guilt which is hard to shake off." 
To understand how it all happened, 
you have to know not only that an impetuous twenty-year- 
old fell madly in love at first sight. You have to know, 
too, that he was several hundred miles away from his 
home and family in New York, and that he was riding 
high as an announcer at WBT in Charlotte at a salary 
that would be remarkable for a youngster that age even 
these days. {Continued on page 90) 



Young Dr. Malone, with Sandy Becker in the title role, is 
heard M-F., 1 :30 P.M. EDT, CBS. Sponsored by P & G's Crisco. 




No tlouch in the 
kitchen, Sandy 
knows how to whip 
up super snacks | 
comes midnight. Chili 
con came or a 
tamale sandwich— 
that's his speed. . 




32 











Super marketing, Sandy helps fill the 
basket that will feed the 
Becker family. Neighbors used to be 
puzzled by Sandy's unconventional 
working hours. When word why spread 
around, Beckers became known as Malones 

















\ 





■HHMMOt 



Lucky 

Marion 
Mailowe 



Europe's royalty 

flocked to hear her sing — but it's 
Arthur Godfrey, American, she 
admires most of all! 




Arthur himself got into the 
Spanish spirit for this number 
on the Friends television 
program. Says Marion of Arthur: 
"He's beloved backstage as 
much as out front. And he's 
so humble about his own success." 



ONE evening early this year channels all 
along the CBS television network lit up 
with an incandescence usually reserved for 
the debut of a brilliant personality. It was the 
debut of a brilliant personality. What viewers 
saw was a regally beautiful young woman. 
What they heard was a melody of love sung 
in a way seldom seen or heard this side of a 
coaxial cable. Where they heard it was even 
more important: this TV debut was made on 
the Arthur Godfrey and His Friends program, 
and it marked another exciting addition to the 
ever-increasing circle of "little Godfreys." 

The newest little Godfrey is Marion Mar- 
lowe, who's been known by much more exotic 
identifications elsewhere. In London, for in- 
stance, where she played the lead in a musical 
revue, Marion was dubbed "the Modern Cleo- 
patra." The comparison isn't as fantastic as 
it sounds. Marion's mother is of Egyptian- 
French descent, and Marion's long, dark hair, 
wide hazel-green eyes and mobile expressions 
suggest to some how the Queen of the Nile 
might have looked. Marion, however, insists 
that she's plain American from St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, and just about the luckiest girl in the 
world. 

Everything that has happened to her so far 
has followed a fabulously fortunate pattern. 
Luckiest of all, she feels, is her meeting with 
Arthur Godfrey. She ranks it above a mar- 
riage proposal from a maharajah which she 
received while (Continued on page 93) 

Marion Marlowe appears on Arthur Godfrey And His 
Friends, telecast Wed., 8 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV. Spon- 
sored by Chesterfields, Toni Co.. and Pillsbury Mills. 







35 



Come 



The Martins' chief pride, of 
course, is Tony, Jr., ten months. 
Cyd, who has a flair for 
the unusual, picked up the 
weathervane lamp (right) in a 
New England antique shop. 




an 



Love, laughter and music, the Martins agree, are basic 
ingredients for the good life— which is exactly what they have! 

visit Tony Martin 



BY FREDDA DUDLEY BALLING 

Tony Martin and Cyd Charisse have 
achieved that universal dream: country 
living in the city. Their home is situated on 
one of the wide, tree-lined thoroughfares in 
Bel Air ; they are within a few minutes driving 
time of San Fernando Valley where many of 
their friends live, within a few minutes of 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer where Cyd is under 
contract, and within a few minutes of CBS 
where Tony is the star of the Carnation Hour. 
Aside from this accessibility to Los Angeles 
points, however, the Martin house might as 
well be located in some wooded copse far 
from the road of civilization. The broad front 
lawns are shielded from public view by a 
high privet hedge which is punctuated at two 
widely separated points by the entrance and 
exit of a graceful half-moon driveway. The 
house itself is whitewashed brick, stucco and 
siding, and it nestles snugly amid its luxuriant 



landscaping. Camellias grow in huge wooden 
tubs on either side of the dark green door with 
its huge brass knocker. 

Morning, noon or night, the first sound to 
greet the visitor is likely to be music of some 
sort. From Monday through Friday, Tony and 
his musical arrangers play over the recordings 
of the previous week's radio show and work on 
interpretations for the next Sunday's program. 
If Tony isn't actually working, he's likely to be 
singing on a purely personal basis or playing 
a series of new recordings for the household 
to enjoy. 

Tony, junior, is now eight months old and 
is anxious to join in the vocalizing. He is 
always brought downstairs to meet visitors and 
his poise on these (Continued on page 92 j 



Tony Martin is the singing star of Carnation Hour, Sun., 
10 P.M, EDT, CBS. Sponsored by Carnation Milk Co. 




Good food, good talk are what guests 
know they'll find at the Martin home. 
Located in beautiful Bel Air, 
it's within easy reach of the movie studios 
and the broadcasting station. 



37 



"Tell me," Groucho asked a 
contestant, "why did you come to 
California?" 

"My doctor advised me to get 
rid of my sinus trouble," replied 
Yucca. 

"And did you?" asked Groucho. 

"No, it's worse than before," 
laughed Yucca. 

"Well, in that case, it's a good 
thing you came to California," 
countered Groucho, "at least vou y 
got rid of your doctor.' r 




Groucho turned to a pretty 
U.C.L.A. freshman and asked if she 
were being rushed by any frater- 
nities. 

"You mean sororities — fraterni- 
ties don't rush women." 

Groucho shook his head. "Things 
have certainly changed since I went 
to school. We used to rush any- 
thing." 




"Are all hostesses as pretty as 
you?" an' intrigued Groucho 
asked an airline hostess. 

"Well, the company does hire 
girls on the attractive side." 

A long look later Groucho com- 
mented, "I don't know which is 
your attractive side, but there's 
certainly nothing wrong with the 
one I'm looking at. Tell me, is 
there anything about your passen- 
gers that annoys you?" 

"Passengers who don't obey 
rules and men who smoke cigars." 

Groucho remonstrated, "You 
mean I can't smoke my cigar?" 

"Well, we'd use discretion," was 
the cautious reply. 

"Well, I use tobacco," quipped 
Groucho. 

"If you don't annoy the lady 
passengers, you may smoke," she 
conceded. 

Whooped Groucho, "In that 
case I won't smoke. It's more fun 
to annoy the ladies. I didn't know 
there was a choice!" 



^ 



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Editor's Note: When You Bet Your Life 
was on radio only (Wed., 9 P.M., EDT, 
NBC) the listener had to mentally supply 
the cigar-waving and leering Groucho Marx 
threw in as a bonus along with remarks 
to contestants. Now that You Bet Your 
Life is on TV as well (Thurs., 8 P.M., 
EDT, NBC-TV; both DeSoto sponsored) 
these trademarx can be seen. On these 
pages are printed famous "Groucho-isms." 



Gioucho -isms 



When Groucho asked a Good 
Humor girl if her job wasn't un- 
usual, she explained, "There are 
only thirteen of us and we're an 
experiment. If we make good you 
may see us all over." 

A wicked look stole over 
Groucho's face and his eyebrows 
shot up. "Well, if you get all that 
for a dish of ice cream, it's not 
bad!" 




/ 



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Groucho asked a lifeguard 
whether it was true that a drown- 
ing person always went down three 
times. 

"No, that's a fallacy. I remem- 
ber seeing somebody bob up and 
down seven times." 

"That's nice," sneered Groucho, 
"the poor sucker is out there 
drowning and you're standing on 
the beach counting." 




38 








When the young soldier told 
Groucho that he was just a buck 
private, Groucho asked . . . "and 
what would you like to be?" 

"A civilian!" said the soldier. 

"Sorry, we're full up," replied 
Groucho, "but leave your name at 
the front office, and if anything 
turns up, we'll let you know." 



"~V.. 



Groucho's sporting blood came 
to a boil when he interviewed a 
pretty girl judo expert and a 
burly football player. 

Groucho bet he could steal a 
kiss from the girl; she said he 
couldn't. Wily Groucho asked 
her to demonstrate a judo hold 
on the football star and as she 
held the husky fellow with an 
arm lock, Groucho whipped over 
and kissed her on the cheek 




A dark-haired beauty in a 
deputy sheriff's uniform caused 
Groucho to comment favorably 
about female sheriffs. He asked 
her if she had ever had occasion 
to use her .38 revolver. When 
she replied no, Groucho ex- 
claimed, "Let's you and I go out 
after the show tonight. I'd give 
you occasion. I'm having wal- 
nuts for dinner and we* can use 
your revolver to crack them 





V 




Groucho talked to a newly-mar- 
ried man, six feet, five inches tall, 
and asked to try on his coat. The 
coat came down to Groucho's 
knees as he walked around the 
stage. He reached in the pocket 
and pulled out a box containing 
ant powder. 

"Ant powder," he roared, 
"you've only been married six 
weeks and already you're trying 
to poison her. "You know," con- 
tinued Groucho looking innocent- 
ly at the cameras, "I didn't know 
people got ants in their coats." 



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39 



J^ 



Eileen Wilson knew what she wanted— a new figure! 



This popular singing star of NBC's Hit Parade once weighed 185 pounds. 



Now she's a slender 125 pounds. How did she do it? 



She 9 8 the cook 



Eileen prepares her own meals so she won't be tempted by 
luscious, fattening foods. To help her remember the menus 
that her family doctor suggested, she tacks a daily diet 
card on the kitchen cupboard door. Says Eileen, "I always 
serve my food on pretty plates and use a cheerful-looking 
tablecloth. It's surprising how this makes the meal look 
so much more appetizing. It helps to take the sting out 
of dieting and certainly does bolster my wilUpower." 



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RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR 



R BETTER LIVING 



brought happiness and success to Eileen Wilson 



On these pages she shows you the "Wilson-Wonder- Way-to-a-Trim- 



Figure." It worked for Eileen and now she's the happiest gal in town. 



\Iavbe it can do the same for vou. BY DORRY ELLIS 



No candy for Eileen 



lo tease her by offering; chocolates, she doesn't give in. 
tier motto is: "Develop a determined resistance against 
anything that is an obstacle to a feathery figure. To 
keep my eager hands from reaching into the candybox, I 
learned how to knit. That diverts my attention plenty! 
Bu\v hands don't get in trouble . . . and eating between 
meals is the kind of trouble I go out of ray wav to avoid." 



Time out for grooming 



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Every moment in Eileen's busy life is put to good use. 
As she studies the lyrics of a new song she will sing on 
Hit Parade, she sits on the floor cross-legged and brushes 
her hair until her. scalp tingles. This daily stimulation 
keeps her hair at a shining pitch of health. Eileen claims 
that one of the most important parts of her beauty rou- 
tine is special care of her clear complexion. She regu- 
larlv massages her face arfd neck with a rich cream. 



page 



A new figure 



• • • continued 



Fresh air and fun 



A brisk walk through the park is stimulating, especially 
when Eileen takes Chris, their black cocker spaniel pup. 
along for exercise. As Eileen walks she inhales and ex- 
hales deeply to develop rhythmic breathing. Twice a week 
she goes horseback riding. This gets her out in the air, 
tones her system, and provides healthful relaxation. 
She says enthusiastically, "After a few hours riding. 
I feel so full of pep that Tm in higii spirits for days." 



j?Cn-*-? 



MONDAY 
Breakfast: 
Lunch : 
Dinner: 



TUESDAY 

Breakfast: 

Lunch: 

Dinner: 



WEDNESDAY 
Breakfast : 
Lunch : 
Dinner: 



THURSDAY 

Breakfast: 
Lunch : 
Dinner: 



Breakfast: 
Lunch: 
Dinner : 



SATURDAY 

Breakfast: 

Lunch: 

Dinner: 



Breakfast : 
Lunch : 
Dinner: 



V&#*L 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Eggs, spinach or tomatoes, coffee 
Eggs, combination salad, one piece of 
dry toast, grapefruit, coffee 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Eggs, grapefruit, coffee 
Steak, tomatoes, lettuce, celery, olives, 
cucumbers, coffee or tea 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Eggs, tomatoes, spinach, coffee 
Two iamb chops, celery, cucumbers, to- 
matoes, coffee 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Eggs, spinach, coffee 

Eggs, cottage cheese, spinach, one piece 
dry dark toast, coffee 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Eggs, spinach, coffee 

Fish, combination salad, one piece dry 
toast, grapefruit, coffee 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Large fruit salad 

Plenty of steak, celery, cucumbers, coffee 
or tea 



Grapefruit, one or two eggs, black coffee 
Cold chicken, tomatoes, grapefruit, coffee 
Vegetable soup, chicken, tomatoes, cooked 
cabbage, carrots, grapefruit, coffee 

This tivo-iveek diet sJiouhl be follotveil 
only if your family physician approves 



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Three ways to exercise 



Weight has a way of shifting around to the wrong places. 
Although Eileen maintains an even 125 pounds, she still 
must exercise regularly to keep her figure in good pro- 
portion. Here's how she does it: Daily housework is a 
wonderful way of stretching and hending (she keeps her 
stomach flat and bends from the waist, of course) then 
she does the bicycle exercise to slim her legs. Her pos- 
ture is improved by ballet practice. This also adds grace. 





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New clothes — new glamor 



"Can you imagine what a thrill it was for me to lose sixty pounds! I used to look longingly 
iris with lithe figures. If only I could wear pretty clothes! But as 
long as I remained 185 pounds I had to be content with matronly styles. Life is mighty 
different for me, now that I tip the scales at 125 pounds. I've 
learned to pick clothes that flatter my figure. I love color in my life so I wear beautiful pastels 
as well as bold colors in plaid or printed designs. My make-up is carefully planned to 

blend or contrast with my outfit. Most of all, I love the self-assurance that perfume gives me. 
Think of what a new figure did for me! It opened the door to happiness and success.'* 




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The creator of One 
Mans Family gives you a new 
drama with new and 
equally endearing characters 



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Carlton E. Morse, creator of One 
Man's Family and I Love a Mys- 
tery, has done it again. His new daytime 
serial, The Woman in My House, is a 
warm, human story of an average family 
living in the better part of Chicago. 
Father James Carter has a heavy problem 
on his hands just now because his teen- 
age son and daughter, Clay and Sandy, 
have become involved in a manslaughter 
charge. Jeff, the oldest son, whose ideas 
often conflict with his father's, is engaged 
in secret work for the FBI 
and unable to tell his fam- 
ily what he is doing. They, 
judging from the company 
he keeps, suspect him of 
being a racketeer, particu- 
larly after his sister, Vir- 
ginia, overhears a myste- 
rious phone call. Virginia, 
James Carter's favorite, is 
equally devoted to him. 
Her mother, Jessie, al- 
though she loves her hus- 
band dearly, encourages 
Virginia to get out and 
live a life of her own. 



The Woman In My House is 
heard M-F at 1 :45 EDT, NBC, 
sponsored by Manhattan Soap. 



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Gene 
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prize 
round-up! 



Calling all junior 

cowboys — and girls, too — 

it's contest time! 



BY GENE AUTRY 

Next to having a horse all your own 
— which isn't easy these days con- 
sidering so many people live in cities and 
towns — the ttext best thing to get around 
on for a boy or girl is a bicycle. And I 
think the bicycle that's the grand prize in 
this contest is just about the most exciting 
thing any young cowboy could win. But 
there's something else I want to pass 
along to you. Looking and living the part 
of a cowboy isn't enough. A fearless, 
honest cowboy has high ideals. No matter 
what the circumstances, he has the cour- 
age to stick by his code. This is my code 
and I'm mighty proud to pass it along to 
you. 

. Gene Autry's "Code of the West" 

A cowboy never takes unfair advantage 
— even of an enemy. 

A cowboy never betrays a trust. 

A cowboy always tells the truth. 

A cowboy is kind — to small children, 
to old folks and to animals. 

A cowboy is free from racial and 
religious prejudice. 

A cowboy is helpful and when anyone's 
in trouble he lends a hand. 

A cowboy is a good worker. 

A cowboy is (Continued on page 86) 




28 



prizes for bous and 

girls including a genuine 
Gene Autru bieuele! 




The Gene Autry 
Show is heard 
Sat.,8P.M.EDT, 
CBS;onTVSun., 
7 P.M., EDT, 
CBS-TV. Spon- 
sored by William 
Wrigley, Jr., Co. 



46 



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Wife, mother, actress— off 

the air as well as on, Big Sister 
knows what goes into a comfortable, 
well-run and happy home 



It seem* to me I've had housing problems 
longer and more often than anybody else I know. 
My husband and I came to New York from our 
home in Toronto, Canada, shortly after the close 
of the war — Court and I are both actors, and 
since New York is the heart of radio and theater, 
it seemed the logical place for us Bensons to 
settle. 

At that time the housing situation couldn't 
have been worse. We finally found a little — and 
I use the word advisedly — two-and-a-half-room 
walk-up apartment. The half room was really 
the kitchen in the hall. About two years later the 
arrival of Andrea necessitated another move — 
this time to a small four-room apartment. Here 
our bedroom overlooked the delivery entrance of 
the local post office, and we slept to the accom- 
paniment of the loading and unloading of trucks. 

When it was reported on good authority that 
we might expect another addition to the family 






last December, we made a mad dash for our by 
now near and dear friends, the real estate agents. 
This time we decided to find a home large 
enough to house us once and for all. Of course 
I really hadn't had in mind a place with a dining 
room large enough to flood over in the winter 
to accommodate moderate-sized skating parties 
. . . but that's what I got! The building is quite 
old, and as is true with most old buildings, the 
rooms are over-sized, with extremely high ceil- 
ings. With the present cost of furniture, the pros- 
pect of outfitting a large seven-room apartment 
was somewhat staggering to us. But the thought 
of having to hunt for another place was even 
more so. 

It was at this point that I developed an in- 
terest in auction sales. A wonderful institution, 
auction sales, and I can't recommend them highly 
enough to people on budgets! As Court says, if 
you're persistent, you can find anything and 
everything in these going-going-gone houses. 
However, if you don't know much about woods 
and authentic antiques, I suggest you take time 
off to study your local auction houses to deter- 
mine which is the most reliable. 



Court and I are particularly fond of English 
and French periods, so in the living room we've 
mixed Chippendale with a few pieces of Louis XV 
and XVI. One of our pride and joys is a Mar- 
quise chair — a semi-circular cushioned chair that 
was constructed to accommodate madame and her 
hooped skirt. It makes a really handsome small 
love seat and is a wonderful conversation piece! 






RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR f OR BETTER LIVING 



Fc 



Despite its size, I couldn't be more proud of 
my dining room. The room has been styled 
around a buffet I found — antique glass trimmed 
with silver leafed wood. After we purchased the 
buffet, I was met with the problem (there I go 
again) of finding suitable chairs and table. 
Ordinary woods such as mahogany, oak, etc., 
killed the buffet, and vice versa. So we bought 
the dining table and chairs for their shape only, 
and had a little furniture man silver leaf them 
to match the buffet. The finish is heat resistant, 
so I use only table mats — a great laundry saver ! 
And it's really ever so much more practical than 
mahogany and dark woods. The silver color 
does not act as a reflector to the dust that hourly 
settles in New York apartments. 

The arrival of Paul, our second child, posed 
the usual problem of helping our two-year-old 
daughter through her period of adjustment. 
Andrea is an active, warm-hearted child, just a 
bit on the sensitive side, and a true "ham" at 
heart. But with two such parents. I suppose it 
was to be expected. We tried to be very careful 
to get the point across that the expected addition 
to the family was going to be just that — an addi- 
tion, not someone to take the place of Andrea. 
At Christmas we gave Andrea a washable doll 
and a doll baby bassinet so that she and Mother 
would be able to take care of their new babies 
together. While I was in the hospital, Court 
brought her a lollypop each day "from Paul," 
and by the time 1 came home with Paul, she had 
developed a really friendly feeling toward her 
new brother. I must admit, though, that she was 
somewhat shocked and a bit disappointed at his 
size. She evidently hadn't really believed he 
would be so close to her doll baby in size. How- 
ever, it wasn't long {Continued on page 67 1 



Big Sister is heard Monday through Friday at 1:00 P.iVl. 
EDT on CBS stations. Sponsored by Procter & Gamble. 



Tuo-and-a-halj-year old Andrea becomes a big 

sister, too. but at the moment she'd rather give favorite 

doll Susie the same careful attention mother 

gives baby brother Paul. Mother is Grace Matthews, radio's 

Big Sister: Daddy is Court Benson, actor. 



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62 



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RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR'S 



daytime fashions for you 




"|~H OR PLAY, for street wear, for dress-up, too — for all-day all-summer prettiness 

and comfort, cotton look-alikes for mother and daughter are first choice. There's 
a certain something about these mother-daughter darlings that makes Mama look 
younger, lovelier, and daughter feel most elegantly grown-up — and that's good for 
them both! Two sets of such look-alikes are worn here by Barbra Fuller (who plays Claudia in the 
radio version of One Man's Family) and a small friend. In the color picture, jaunty 
sailor dresses, double-breasted, with matching square collars and deep, stand-out 
pockets. Navy piping points up collar and dress-front. 

Done in a wonderful fabric, Everglaze Devon, a wrinkle-resistant cotton with a permanent 
finish which means no starching, ever! These pretties come in pink, blue, yellow 

or white. Mother's dress, sizes 10-18, under $9.00. Little girl's 
sizes 3-6x, under $5.00; 1-3, under $4.00; 7-12, 
under $6.00. Summer-wonderful accessories: white gloves 
by Fownes and shoes by Capezio. On this page, another 
pair of "twins." For play, for casual wear, a one-piece playsuit, 
sleeveless, with a little round collar and button-front, straight- 
leg shorts. To wear over it when you wish, a matching 
button-front skirt perked up with patch pockets. In cheerful prints, cherry 
red or blue on white ground. Mother's 

dress comes in sizes 10-18 and is priced under $11.00. Small fry 
outfit in 3-6x is under $6.00 and 7-12, under $8.00. The material is 
a printed, embossed cotton that looks 
for all the world like pique. With these sun-and-fun 
clothes, so easy to wash and to iron, you're all set for summer. 
These fashions bv Jack Borgenicht at stores on page 23 



One Man's Family is heard M-F at 7 :45 P.M. EDT, NBC network stations. 
Sponsored by Miles Laboratories' Bactine, Tabcin and Alka Seltzer. 



5/ 



Junior 

MIRROR 





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Happy Felton, here with Preacher Roe, right, and a Knot Holer, 

Tips on Baseball 

By Happy Felton 

Hi, fellows. This is the most exciting 
time of the year with baseball in full 
swing. When I was a youngster I couldn't 
decide whether Christmas or the opening day 
of the season was the most important but I 
finally decided on the "opener" for Christ- 



mas lasts only twenty-four hours and base- 
ball runs five months. And on the Knot-Hole 
Gang show we try to make your enjoyment 
even keener. When you dial us in, you'll 
learn how you can qualify for a free trip to 
the ball field where you can talk with your 
favorite big league players and, of course, 
we have many of these same stars on the 
program with hardball advice for you. 

You'd be surprised what a big kick the 
players get out of chewing the rag with you. 
I remember one youngster meeting Preacher 
Roe under the stands. 

He asked, "How many innings should I 
pitch at a time?" (Continued on page 68l 



Lucky Pup 
Cutouts 

By Doris Brown 

HERE ARE Foodini 
the Magnificent, 
Jolo the clown and Pin- 
head. You can have pa- 
per dolls of them to play 
with or set on the top 
of your television cab- 
inet. Directions: Paste each of these figures 
on a piece of cardboard then carefully cut 
along the heavy outline of each. You can 
easily make a cardboard support to paste on 
the back so the paper dolls will stand up. 
M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, 6:30 P.M., Sat., CBS-TV. 





52 





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UO 




A Wilmer Story 

By Pat Meikle 

(Sketch #1)— It 
seems that one eve- 
ning, right after sup- 
per Mr. and Mrs. 
Pigeon settled down 
in front of their tele- 
vision set to watch 
one of their favorite programs. Wilmer and 
Maxwell, the Mouse, had gone off to their 
room to read their picture books. 
(Sketch #2) — Just as the program had 
reached the part that Mr. and Mrs. Pigeon 
were most anxious to see, Maxwell came 
tripping in — walking in front of the screen! 
— to tell them something funny he had just 
seen in his book. By the time they had got- 
ten him out of the way, they had missed the 
favorite part of their favorite program. 
(Sketch #3)- — He couldn't understand why 
they were so upset about it but the very next 
day, when Wilmer and Maxwell were watch- 
ing their favorite program, Mrs. Pigeon came 
in and stood in front of the screen with her 
knitting and began talking about someone 
she had met at the grocer's that afternoon. 
(Sketch #4) — Wilmer and Maxwell thought 
this was quite unimportant when they were 
watching their favorite show, and they told 
Mrs. Pigeon so. Mrs. Pigeon reminded 
Maxwell about the previous evening and sud- 
denly both boys realized that they had been 
guilty of interrupting their parents' pleasure 
quite often in the same way. They felt quite 
bad about it but realized, as Mrs. Pigeon 
pointed out, that they had learned one very 
good lesson: If you don't like to be inter- 
rupted in watching your favorite television 
program, be considerate of grownups watch- 
ing their favorites and don't interrupt them. 

Baby Sitter: Mon.-Fri., 10 A.M. EDT and Magic 
Cottage: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 P.M. EDT: both on DuMont. 











&to 



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BY NANCY CRAIC 

Radio Television Mir mi 
Food Counselor. 
Heard 4 P.M. EDT, 
Mon.-Fri. on ABC stations. 




iiit -yourself 
Sundaes 



-K************- 



CREPE paper firecrackers are safer than 
the real thing. v I say this every year be- 
cause the July Fourth I remember most clearly 
is the one of loud noise! All the children had 
stacked their assorted fireworks. Someone 
dropped a piece of lighted "punk" and in a 
few seconds everything had exploded. To our 
excitement and dismay because this meant our 
celebration was over. To our parents' delight 
because the time of danger was over. I'm quite 
sure the ice cream sundaes and cake that we 
had later helped to lessen our grief. 

BRANDY MARSHMALLOW SAUCE 

Makes about IV2 cups sauce 

V2 pound of marsh- 2 tablespoons brandy 

mallows 10 marshmallows. cut 

!4 cup coffee up 

Combine V2 pound marshmallows and coffee in 
the top of a double boiler. Place over hot water. 
Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until 
marshmallows begin to melt. It will take only 
a few minutes. Remove from heat, stir until 
mixture is smooth and fluffy. Add brandy; mix 
well. Place cut up marshmallows in bottom of 
sauce dish. Pour warm sauce over them. Serve 
immediately with ice cream. 

BUTTERSCOTCH SAUCE 

Makes about 2 cups sauce 
% cup brown sugar %. cup butter 

1 cup light corn syrup % pint light cream 



Combine sugar and corn syrup in a saucepan. 
Bring to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Add 
butter and light cream. Bring to a brisk boil. 
Remove from heat immediately. Cool and serve 
on ice cream with chopped nuts. 

RASPBERRY OR BLUEBERRY SAl CE 

Makes about \-'% cups sauce 

'■i> cup sugar - x .-> cup cold water 

2 teaspoons corn- 2 cups fresh rasp- 

starch berries or blue- 

dash of salt berries 

Combine sugar, cornstarch and salt in a sauce- 
pan. Stir water in slowly; mix until smooth. 
Add berries. Cook over low heat, stirring until 
sauce is clear and thickened. Cool and serve. 

GRAPEFRUIT SHERBET 

Makes about IV2 quarts sherbet 

4 large grapefruit 1 pint heavy cream 

1 1 cup lemon juice whipped 

1V2-2 cups sugar 

Scoop out pulp and juice from grapefruit. Add 
lemon juice and sugar (to taste). Mix well, fold 
in whipped cream. Set refrigerator at lowest 
temperature. Turn mixture into refrigerator tra\ . 
freeze until firm about % inch from edge. Put 
into a chilled bowl, beat with rotary beater 
until mixture is thick mush. Return to tra\. 
continue freezing until firm throughout (2 
hours ) . Then set controls halfway between 
coldest and normal temperature until serving. 






RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR M OR BETTER LIVING 



F ( 






55 




BY JAN MURRAY 

When CBS assigned me to emcee their big Songs For 
Sale musical show a year ago, it was not only pleasant 
but downright surprising. I couldn't tell B-sharp from 
four pounds of rutabagas, Strauss was just an auto store, 
and music by Handel meant a hurdy-.gurdy. But I plunged 
in. If I had known what was in store I would have tripled 
my insurance, given an assumed name . . . and plunged 
in even faster. 

Actually in many ways being basically unversed (stupid) 
in music was helpful. On Songs For Sale I interview four 
new, unknown songwriters each Friday night, and my 
main task is to put them at ease. Usually after my very 
first question, these guests, novices though they are, realize 
they know so much more than I do that they're completely 
at ease. Then they sympathize with me and try to help me 
relax. Working with these newcomers is fun. It's very 
gratifying to share their excitement as they hear their 
song, their very own composition, brought to life by Ray 
Bloch and his big show-time orchestra and sung by top 
vocalists such as Richard Hayes and Rosette Shaw. Re- 
membering my own beginning in show business, I can join 
with them in the thrill of hearing their own efforts cheered 
by packed studio audiences and listeners coast-to-coast. 

Songs For Sale appealed to me from the start as a fresh 
stimulating program idea, but it seemed to have one draw- 
back. Veteran producer Herb Moss was an acute show- 
man with fifteen years of top show credits, and orchestra 
leader Ray Bloch was a music wizard, but I was afraid 
we might run out of new song- (Continued on page 102) 



Songs For Sale, with Jan Murray, is heard Fridays, 8 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

Jan is also on Sing It Again, simulcast Sat., 10 P.M. EDT, CBS & 

CBS-TV. Sponsored by Carter Products and Sterling Drug. 



They all know me j 



f 





i 




|v :;a^ 







/aw claims he's a musical 
illiterate, but he's learned — 
and learned fast — to fit 
his role as Songs For Sale 
emcee. His wife, former 
actress Toni Kelly, shares his 
fondness for mysteries and 
movies. And she's tolerant 
of his shower serenades. 



Eleven-month-old daughter 
Celia, Jan suspects, is 
musically inclined. She, 
hoivever, isn't telling, 
preferring to keep her songs 
on a low, gurgling scale. 
The Murrays live in a 
midtown Manhattan apartment 
near the CBS studios. 




More 
Songs For 
Sale 




57 




Hayes 
fever 




^^ 




3 



5fe 





• Dungarees are his off-stage rai- 
ment, and playful off-key whistling 
the only vice of this very likable 
croon prince whose strictly on-key 
voice rules the ratings as one of 
the hottest things in show business 
today. And Richard's whistling 
may even be excusable on the 
grounds of a severe case of royal 
bliss. With a lovely little queen, 
wife Peggy Ann Garner, four 
lovely big radio and TV shows, 
booming record sales, plus the 
satisfaction of doing a job he 
likes, this boy should ring bells 
and shoot rockets. 

Born near Brooklyn's waterfront 
district, the Hayes youngster first 
discovered his voice in Mark 
Hopkins' school glee club. After 
singing with Teddy 
Phillip's band, he tried 
Godfrey's Talent Scouts 
and received "the 
t^ greatest spontaneous 

V\U ovation given any win- 

ner on the show." With SFS came 
recognition and romance. Vocalist 
Rosemary Clooney introduced him 
to Hollywood star Peggy Ann Gar- 
ner and from the moment they met 
they had only to 
name the wedding 
date. They did and 
it was last Wash- 
ington's Birthday. 
Peggy and Rich- 
ard live in a small 
Manhattan apart- 
ment with Miss 
Mococo, their 
cocker spaniel. 



Responsible for 

the contagion 
known as Hayes 
Fever — Richard 
himself with 
wife Peggy Ann. 




Brooklyn's lovely Rosette Shaw 
has always .had two loves, dogs and 
show business. She started tap 
dancing when eight, but at thir- 
teen a heart condition forced two 
years of vexing idleness, with only 
her fox terrier to comfort her. 
Undismayed, she studied voice, 
and at sixteen she put up her hair 
to look eighteen and landed a 
vocal spot at a small local night 
club. Her mother kept her com- 
pany in her dressing room, and 
between shows she studied algebra 
and Spanish for next day's high 
school classes. After graduation 
she and her pup toured eighteen 
months with Miguelito Valdes' 
Orchestra. Paramount Theatre and 
La Martinique booked her as a 
solo, she made her TV debut with 
Allen Dale, and premiered on net- 
work radio in April on Songs for 
Sale Friday the 13th. Rosette is 
single, makes her own clothes, 
avidly reads Somerset Maugham. 






Man in charge of SFS headaches is Herbert Moss, the 
producer. Staffers say he's more likely to make a joke 
than a jibe in tense moments. But, above right with 
Jan, it's mock solicitation for Murray's mock 
anguish. Below: Herb, Rosette, Richard, Ray Bloch. 





More 
Songs For 
Sale 



59 





CAN you write words to a tune? Two Songs For Sale 
professionals think you can, veteran conductor- 
arranger Ray Bloch and panelist Mitch Miller, director of 
popular records for Columbia Records. 

During the past year on the program, they have dis- 
covered two reasons why fresh new lyric writers are not 
coming to light. In reviewing music submitted, they found 
many promising lyricists hampered by an unwieldy ama- 
teur melody or by the lack of a musical collaborator. 

Therefore, to encourage undiscovered word-workers, 
Radio and Television Mirror has volunteered to be a 
silent musical collaborator. An original workable tune has 
been procured and appears on the following pages. This 
music is for you to use in writing words to fit it. Prizes, 
of course. See contest rules on opposite page. 

Messrs. Bloch and Miller, the head judges, are keenly 
interested in developing new talent and offer these helpful 
hints to would-be Hammersteins and Porters: 
DO 1. Listen to the tune repeatedly until it's fixed in your 
mind before writing a single word. 

2. Use just one idea, modify and relate to it. (Example: 
''Some Enchanted Evening") 

3. Be natural, simple, brief, avoid triteness. 

4. Write a word poem that reads well without music. 

5. If helpful, write with the style of a particular singer 
or band in mind. 

6. Get a fresh-sounding title, repeat it in its entirety at 
least twice in the same relative place in the song. Make it 
a clue to the mood and direction of the whole song. 

7. Experiment with internal rhymes and also sound 
effects especially where tune runs too fast for words. 

8. Have the story line end optimistically. 

DON'T 1. Don't force a rhyme. If the second matching 
word is strained, go back and change both. 

2. Don't use harsh sounds such as "j's" and "k's," 
especially on notes that are sustained. 

3. Don't worry if song can be sung by just a woman 



for tune writers 



Songs For Sale's regular panelist, Mitchell 

Miller, is director of popular recordings 

for Columbia Records. He and Ray Bloch, right, 

conductor-arranger for SFS, believe that 

studying the techniques of top craftsmen 

is an important preliminary to good 

lyric writing. They also suggest writing lyrics 

for current hits, trying different tempos. 



(ex.: "The Man I Love") or just a man. 

4. Don't tangle with taboo topics in questionable taste. 

5. Don't worry if you don't know musical mechanics. 
Most successful lyricists are poor musicians. 

6. Finally, don't forget that public taste is unpredictable. 
Songs contradicting all these tips become hits. 

SAMPLE LYRIC FOR CONTEST TUNE 

Tin Pan Alley's famous songwriting team of Ervin Drake 
and Jimmy Shirl have volunteered their help with a sample 
lyric as a starter. They are best known for such hits as "Tico, 
Tico," and "Come to the Mardi Gras." 

IT HAPPENS EVERYTIME 
Lyrics by Ervin Drake & Jimmy Shirl 

I keep saying that we're through 

But everytime I do 

Just then you appear 

And I seem to hear — bells chime . . . 

They go ding-dong — a-dingity-dong. 

IT HAPPENS EVERYTIME! 

Told my heart: "Now hush your fuss — 
Romance is not for us!" 

But soon as we meet 

My heart starts to beat — in rhyme . . . 

It goes tick-tock — a-tickety-tock. 

IT HAPPENS EVERYTIME! 

All day, how I pray for nighttime, 
That's when I'll forget, it seems. 
I close my eyes at nighttime — 
Then what do you do — you walk into my 
dreams ! 

Darling, tell me that it's true, 

It happens to you, too, 

That ring in the head 

That sounds like a wed-ding chime . . . 

It goes ding-dong — a-dingity-dong . . . 

IT HAPPENS EVERYTIME!! 




T"- 



Songs JFar 
Sale Contest 
Rules 



Here are the rules 
and regulations — read them 
carefully before 
submitting your entry 



• You need not send in the printed musical 
pages. Just type or print your lyrics in a 
form similar to the sample form at left. 
Clearly mark your name and address. 

Send to: Radio Television Mirror Songs 
For Sale Contest, P.O. Box 1370. Grand Cen- 
tral, New York 17, N. Y.. postmarked on or 
before July 8, 1951. All entries become the 
property of Radio Television Mirror and 
none can be returned. The editors can enter 
into no correspondence concerning entries. 
All entries will be judged on the basis of 
originality, aptness of words and title, and 
conformity to the structure and mood of the 
music. Decision of the judges will be final. 

The winner will be notified by July 22, and 
will receive an all-expense trip to and from 
New York City plus a weekend at the famous 
Hotel Vanderbilt on Park Avenue. The win- 
ner will appear on the Songs For Sale pro- 
gram of August 3, provided it is still on the 
air. (In the event that Songs For Sale goes 
off the air, no award will be made. In the 
event of a tie, a duplicate award will be 
given.) On Songs For Sale, the winner 
of the Radio Television Mirror contest 
will be among the four whose lyrics are 
played on the program. If the contest 
winner's lyrics are judged by the show's 
panel to be the best among the four, they 
will then be published by a New York 
song publishing house. The winner on 
SFS receives $200; losers receive $50 each. 

The guidance lyric in the opposite column 
is just given for encouragement. Don't feel 
constrained to follow their style. The mel- 
ody on pages 62 and 63 
is basically a rhythm 
ballad with both lyric 
and novelty qualities. 
It Was designed to de- 
pend for life on the 
words that vou devise. 



Turn the 
Page For 
the Tune 



61 




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music by CARL BOSLER 
lyrics by 



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Call me 
mother! 





Singing lullabies over a crib is new for Maggie— but how she loves it! 



64 






"Margaret Whiting sings on the Jack Smith Show, M & F, 7:15 P.M. EI)T. CHS. Sponsor: P & G's Tide 




BY MARGARET WHITING 

Most women expect at some time in 

their lives to become mothers. Most people expect most women to 
do so. News of approaching motherhood is usually greeted 
with delighted cries of "Darling, how 
perfectly wonderful," or "I'm so happy for you," 
or "Gee, that's really great." I know, because I've said the 
very same things myself countless times to others. 
But what happens when I have a little announcement of my own 
to make? People look at me in disbelief and gasp, "Oh, no! Not you!" 
It's disconcerting to say the least, but then all 
those people couldn't possibly knOw that the Maggie 
Whiting who was telling them this news was not the same girl 
they had known in the carefree days of old. 
Not so very long ago I was strictly the career girl. I loved 

to stay up late, go to night- 
clubs, parties, see every 
show in town. Sometimes 
on an hour's notice I'd 
throw some clothes in a 

suitcase and hop a plane to some distant city just to visit 
with an old friend or member of the family whom 
I hadn't seen for a while. 

I remember the time my sister Barbara called me 
from New York. She didn't want anything special. She said 
she just got lonesome for me and wanted to hear my 
voice. Without (Continued on page 82) 





Sophie Tucker visits 
the Shamrock to sing 
some of the songs 
she has made famous 
throughout the world. 





SATURDAY AT THE SHAMROCK 



There's a great big beautiful Texas moon over Houston to- 
night" is the cue for the start of the shenanigans for Saturday 
at the Shamrock. Originating from Glen McCarthy's fabulous 
Shamrock Hotel, this coast-to-coast American Broadcasting Com- 
pany show presents the nation's top-drawer talent. 

When Texas does anything, it does it BIG ! The emphasis of the 
entire KXYZ show is on the best in entertainment — BIG names in 
motion pictures and BIG names in radio. Featured stars playing 
at the Shamrock Hotel are guests-of-honor on the show. But they 
are much more than guests. The script is built around them, and 
each successive week makes the list of performers who have ap- 
peared read like a Who's Who in Show Business. 

During the past twelve months people like Dorothy Lamour, Phil 
Harris, Burns and Allen, Dinah Shore, Tommy Dorsey, Maxie 
Rosenbloom, Jack Carson, Mel Torme and Sophie Tucker — to name 
just a few — have presented the best in comedy and music. 

Versatile and dynamic Fred Nahas is producer and emcee of the 
show. On hand to provide the music is Henry King and his orches- 
tra, aided by that rising young tenor. Dick Krueger. Robert H. 
Nolan writes the extremely varied script each week. 




KXYZ's Fred Nahas chats with 
Mel Torme. At right, Burns and 
Allen drop in on the Shamrock 
cast to spend an unforgettable 
hour of hilarity on the program. 



66 




_ 



THIS IS MY LIFE 

(Continued from page 49) before she en- 
tered into the spirit of the bassinet routine, 
and such exciting things as carrying Paul's 
bottle from the kitchen to the nursery make 
her feel so important. To say her parents 
are relieved is an understatement ! 

A number ot my friends with small 
children seem to have trouble with family 
menus, particularly the dessert part. They 
seem to feel that each dinner requires two 
desserts — one for the adults and one for 
the small-fry. Personally. I think this is 
unnecessarily hard on the menu-maker . . . 
myseli. of course. 1 have a number of 
desserts thai are good as well as being good 
for one and all. Two family favorites are: 

Oranae-Lemon Itanium Sherbet: Set 

refrigerator control at coldest point. Mix 
together juice of one orange and one 
lemon. Blend in one banana (peeled and 
mashed), 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water and 
1/3 cup heavy cream. Pour into re- 
frigerator tray and freeze until firm 
about 1/2 inch from edge of tray. 
Turn into chilled bowl and beat with 
rotary beater until free from large lumps. 
Mixture should look rather grainy. Return 
to tray and continue freezing until firm 
throughout, about two hours. Then set 
control back halfway between coldest and 
normal temperature until serving time. 
Makes about one quart. 

Apple Corn Flake Pudding: Place in 
greased baking dish six pared and sliced 
cooking apples. Mix together % cup 
brown sugar, 1 tablespoon lemon rind 
and x /\ teaspoon nutmeg. Spread 2/3 of this 
mixture over apples. Mix remaining 1/3 
of mixture with ] /2 cup crushed corn flakes 
and % cup melted butter. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven (350°F) 45 minutes. Serves 4-6. 

\\ by is it that when you have a "sore 
thumb" in your home, that is where the 
guests congregate? We have probably the 
weirdest pantry anyone ever saw — a 
twenty-five by four-foot hallway lined on 
one side with pantry shelves and a col- 
lapsible serving shelf. With everything 
else that was going on. I hadn't paid too 
much attention to it . . . except to cast 
an occasional shudder in its general direc- 
tion. But when we had our first party, I 
was horrified to find nearly a dozen lost 
guests merrily lining the walls of what I 
had come to think of as "our monstrosity." 

The, very next day I announced to Court 
that since the pantry was seemingly to take 
the place of a basement game room and/ 
or bar, we would have to do something 
about it. It has now been turned into our 
"galley." Court's father had been asso- 
ciated with United Artists for many 
years, and Court has inherited a large and 
most unusual collection of pictures and 
"stills" of old silent movies and stars. 
We had always hoped some day to find a 
place for them. Suddenly it hit us that this 
twenty-five foot wall was just the place. 
So we covered the wall with black and 
white linoleum. At the risk of seeming im- 
modest, there are a number of our own 
pictures interspersed with those of the 
greats of yesterday and today. And now 
I no longer mind the occasional loss of a 
guest to The Gallery. 




Only one soap 
gives your skin this 






And Cashmere Bouquet is proved extra mild . . . leaves 
your skin softer, fresher, younger looking! 

Now Cashmere Bouquet Soap — with the lingering, irresistible 

"fragrance men love" — is proved by lest to be extra mild 

too! Yes, so amazingly mild that its gentle lather 

is ideal for ail types of skin — dry, oily, or normal! And 

dailv cleansing with Cashmere Bouquet helps bring 
out the flower-fresh softness, the delicate smoothness, 

the exciting loveliness you long for! Use 
j. Cashmere Bouquet Soap regularly . . . for the 
\ finest complexion care . . . for a fragrant 
\ invitation to romance 

\\ Complexion and 

big Bath Sizes 



/ 



%i. 








Cashmere 
n\ Bouquet 
Soap 



Adorns your skin with the 
fragrance men looel 







STOP cooking the same old 

HUMDRUM MEALS 



Now there is no need to serve your family 
the same old tiresome dishes day after 
day. For, with the aid of the new Magic 
Cook Book, you can put sparkle and va- 
riety into every meal. And you needn't 
strain your budget either. 

The Magic Cook Book is different from 
the usual cook book. Its luscious recipes 
were gathered from every section of the 
country by the Food Editors of True Story 
Magazine. The result is the most thrilling 
collection of mouth-watering dishes you 
could ever hope for. 

Even Beginners Can Cook 
Taste-Tingling Dishes 

Now, from this selection of over 1500 ex- 
citing recipes you can serve your family 
a tremendous variety of palate-stirring 
dishes. And as the recipes in this unusual 
cook book are described in the step-by- 
step style, you just can't go wrong when 
you follow these easy instructions. Even 
beginners can prepare scrumptious meals 
— at the very first attempt. 



PARTiAL CONTENTS 

Sections on: Cookies 
desserts • frostings 
cakes • pies • meats 
fish • sauces • poultry 
salads • eggs • and 
cheese dishes • bever- 
ages • breads • fruits 
charts and cooking 
tables • serving • can- 
ning • menus • Il- 
lustrated • Washable 
cover. 

Over 500 pages — 32 
illustrated pages. 




Add new zest 
and variety to 
all your meals 
without added 

expense 

This giant 500 page book contains more 
than exciting recipes. It is a complete 
storehouse of cooking information. It 
brings you important facts on nutrition 
. . . special sick room diets . . . suggestions 
on cooking for two . . new ways to use 
package mixes . . . rules for table set- 
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kitchen aids. 

In addition to its many other remarkable 
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to prepare low-cost dishes — also, simple 
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The price of this giant volume is $2.98 
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for your copy of MAGIC COOK BOOK 
today. BARTHOLOMEW HOUSE, Inc., 
Dept. WG-751, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 
17, N. Y. 



Tips on Baseball 

{Continued from page 52) tell you my own 
experience," Preacher said. "When I was 
your age my father permitted me to go 
three innings. When I was sixteen, I could 
go six innings at a time. And after that 
it was up to the opposition.'* 

And I don't think anyone is more anx- 
ious to help than Roy Campanella, who 
has a few sons of his own. One thing Roy 
told me to pass on was, "Tell those boys I 
want to see more curve balls." It seems, 
according to Campy, too many young 
pitchers are depending almost entirely on 
fast balls when they get into a jam. He 
thinks you should mix them up a bit. 

Campy made a point for catchers that 
many of you have been neglecting. After 
you set up the target for your pitcher 
and get that right hand under the glove, 
be sure to make a half-closed fist to 
protect your knuckles from fouls. 

One question that keeps coming up 
every time one of you gets a new mitt is 
how it should be broken in so we may as 
well get it down in writing. Now Campy 
says he uses any kind of oil, vegetable, 
mineral or animal, and he rubs it in good. 
On the other hand, Preacher Roe soaks 
a new glove in water, then puts on a coat 
of oil and leaves it out in the hot sun to 
bake. Billy Cox further confuses the issue 
by saying he uses shoe polish. Maybe it 
boils down to this: any oil or fatty sub- 
stance is good to break in the glove. 

Of course, it's still the man behind the 
mitt that really makes it work. Some of 
the boys were beginning to think that good 
first basemen had to be double-jointed the 
way they split and twist. It's not so. Gil 
Hodges says he got his flexibility through 
years of physical conditioning. 

Same thing with outfield throwing. You 
can't get that ball in accurately without 
plenty of practice. Best thing to do is set 
up a target of your own and just keep 
plugging away at it. 

Now about a right bat, Slugger Jackie 
Robinson says no one can tell you a bat is 
too heavy or too light. A heavy bat may ac- 
tually get you swinging late enough to 
improve the placement of your hits. Best 
thing, Jackie will tell you, is to experiment. 
Duke Snider came up with some good dope, 
too. 

Duke was in a hitting slump when one 
of the Knot-Hole Gang approached him. 

"Duke, you're my ideal," the boy said, 
"but you've been hitting bad lately. How 
come?" 

"I've been swinging at bad pitches," 
Duke answered. 

"I've been doing the same thing," the 
boy admitted sympathetically. "What can 
be done about it?" 

"Well, I spend my nights dreaming 
about the strike zone," Duke told him. 
"Think it out beforehand so your reflex 
comes naturally." 

And he went on to say that a good bat- 
ter must have confidence. He can't be 
afraid of a pitcher. After that it's all in 
trying. Start out with the right form and 
after that it's practice and hard work. 

Knot-Hole Gang is on WOR-TV, New York 
City, WBKB, Chicago, WNAC-TV and WBZ- 
TV, Boston, WJAR, Providence, WFAA, Dal- 
las; WBAP, Fort Worth, WCAU-TV, WPTZ, 
WFIL, Philadelphia. 




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Do your beauty shopping at cosmetic 
counters that feature national favorites 
like these on the next 5 pages. 

Your mirror will say "thank you" 
because these products are national 
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Your pocketbook will also say "thank 
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These twelve popular favorites are 
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Look for the "cover girl" display in 
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AMERICA'S FAVORITE BEAUTY AIDS FOR NEW SUMMER BEAUTY 













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YOUR FAVORITE COSMETIC COUNTER POINTS THE WAY TO 

TRUE Cover Girl ' Beauty ty^ 






TAKE YOUR CHOICE of the three BRECK 
Shampoos for three different hair conditions. 
Whether your hair is dry, oily or normal, 
BRECK has a special shampoo to meet your 
individual needs. Imagine being Sble to know 
that the shampoo you are using is caring for 
your hair as well as adding to its beauty. 
How wonderful, especially during the sum- 
mer months, when you wash your hair more 
often, to have just the right shampoo for 
your hair condition. For fragrant, lustrous- 
looking hair use BRECK Shampoo frequently. 
The three shampoos are available at Beauty 
Shops and wherever cosmetics are sold. 



MAKE DRAB HAIR COLORFUL with safe, tem- 
porary NOREEN. Now you can add all the 
glamorous color you want, or blend-in un- 
wanted gray . . . without making a permanent 
change. NOREEN Super Color Rinse gives your 
hair such natural-looking color . . . color that 
rinses in like it belongs, and stays until 
shampoo'd out. There are 14 true-to-life 
shades, ranging from light gold to lustrous 
black, and lovely grays. Choose one, and "try 
it on." NOREEN is so easy to apply. It takes 
only 3 minutes with the NOREEN Color Appli- 
cator. Give your hair Cover Girl Color. Just 
select, and wear NOREEN Super Color Rinse. 



MANY PEOPLE THINK that underarm deodor- 
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Merely deodorizing is not enough-under- 
arm perspiration must be stopped and stay 
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JUST A MINUTE test will show you how much 
more beautiful you can be . . . with a brighter 
PEPSODENT Smile! First, run your tongue 
over your teeth. Feel the filmy coating that's 
spoiling your smile? Now brush your teeth 
with film-removing PEPSODENT for 1 minute. 
Repeat the tongue test. Notice how much 
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at the dazzling brightness your mirror re- 
veals. PEPSODENT'S exclusive film-removing 
formula gets teeth brighter than the aver- 
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teeth are cleaner teeth... much less sus- 
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CRITICALLY SPEAKING . . . have you looked at 
your complexion in a mirror lately— close up? 
Do skin-faults show through your make-up? 
Are enlarged pores, "bumps," or discolora- 
tions making you feel self-conscious? Not 
noticeable from afar, these faults pop right 
out in close-ups . . . which are often impor- 
tant moments! With SOLITAIR Cake Make-up, 
you're safe. SOLITAIR hides as it beautifies. 
It conceals every little blemish! Your skin 
seems to come alive with youthful freshness. 
SOLITAIR, containing Lanolin, is feather- 
light. 7 lovely shades, 30tf, 60f, $1.00. It's 
one make-up that makes you lovely-to-look-at 
even in close-ups! 



/ 




HOME WAS NEVER LIKE THIS . . . TINTAIR is 
the fabulous home hair coloring that can give 
you a whole, glamorous new personality in 
just a few magic minutes. TINTAIR makes it 
easy for you to have the beautiful, flatter- 
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applied TINTAIR. It's like the most expensive 
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LOOK FOR THE COVER GIRL BEAUTY DISPLAY AT YOUR FAVORITE 
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NEVER THOUGHT THE TIME WOULD COME 
when clothes and furniture would be safe 
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feature, (pat. pending), allows you ample time 
to right the upset bottle. And the "Nail- 
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cover one nail perfectly. Bottle contains 
amazing new CUTEX with the miracle-wear 
ngredient, Enamelon ... in a complete as- 
sortment of nail polish shades! Look for the 
'Spillpruf" label on your next CUTEX bottle. 



HOW LUSCIOUS CAN A SUNTAN BE? ... is a 
question you won't be able to answer until 
you've tried WOODBURVS "TROPIC TAN." 
Just fluff on this sun-enchanted powder color, 
and presto ... your skin turns the deep, 
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look," plus creamy-softness and crushed- 
flower fragrance that clings for hours. Try 
WOODBURY Powder in the new 50? size. It 
is just right to see you through the summer 
with a glorious Tropical Tan. Also 15?, 30?, 
$1.00 sizes (plus tax). 




THE TOP SECRET of day-long hair beauty is 
a morning kiss of SUAVE. Just a few drops 
leaves your hair looking and feeling heavenly 
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adds natural, excitingly alive, highlights to 
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down "hairdressing" look. Only SUAVE con- 
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screens out sun's parching rays.) America's 
beauticians favor SUAVE as the perfect fin- 
ishing touch to keep your permanent and 
your hair lovely. A creation of Helene Curtis, 
foremost name in hair beauty. 50?, $1. 




RUMOR HAS IT that many glamorous stars 
use Hollywood's own famous lipstick, WEST- 
MORE, off the screen as well as on. Now you, 
too, can have "Lips of Enchantment." Yes, 
the WESTMORE "cosmetic secret" lipsticks 
at your store are the very same lipsticks 
used by the Westmores, world-famous Holly- 
wood make-up artists. Thrilling, enticing 
color shades harmonize perfectly with your 
own individual complexion. Special creamy 
base stays on so excitingly long! Creates 
a lasting illusion of radiance and beauty. 
Fashion-right shades now being shown at 
variety, chain and drug store counters. Large 
size 59? plus tax. Medium size also available. 



YOUNGER THAN SPRINGTIME is the way 
PRELL Shampoo leaves your hair. PRELL . . . 
that different, emerald-clear shampoo in the 
handy tube . . . makes your hair look younger, 
because it imparts so much "spring" and 
youthful sparkle. This is true no matter how 
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PRELL leaves your hair shining — Radiantly 
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much younger, more glamorous . . . more 
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TODAY FASHION SAYS that accenting your 
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women the world over depend on MAY- 
BELLINE for a soft, natural-looking effect— 
and no wonder! With MAYBELLINE Mascara, 
lashes appear so softly dark, enchantingly 
long . . . they seem to whisper "Nature grew 
us this way." For more expressive, gracefully 
tapered brows, nothing equals MAYBELLINE'S 
fine, soft Eyebrow Pencil. And a touch of 
MAYBELLINE Eye Shadow intensifies the color 
of your eyes. It's exciting to look lovelier 
with MAYBELLINE Eye Make-up! All desired 
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^fi^-Jj^ 3 * 



LOOK FOR THE COYER GIRL BEAUTY DISPLAY AT YOUR FAVORITE 
COSMETIC COUNTERS • BUY YOUR SUMMER NEEDS TODAY. 





Program 
highlights 
in television 
viewing 

New York City and suburbs, June 11 - July 10 



Baseball Schedule For Television Viewing 



DAY 


TIME 


GAME 


CHANNEL 


Tuesday, June 12 
Wednesday, June 13 
Thursday, June 14 


2:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yank. 
St. Louis vs. Yank. 
St. Louis vs. Yank. 


5&11 
5&11 
5&11 


Friday, June 15 
Saturday, June 16 
Sunday, June 17 


8:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yank. 
Detroit vs. Yank. 
Detroit vs. Yank. 


11 

5&11 

5&11 


Tuesday, June .19 
Wednesday, June 20 
Thursday, June 21 


2:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 
2:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yank. 
Chicago vs. Yank. 
Chicago vs. Yank. 


5&11 
5&11 
5&11 


Friday, June 22 
Saturday, June 23 
Sunday, June 24 


8:30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

.2:00 P.M. 


C'land vs. Yank. 
C'land vs. Yank. 
C'land vs. Yank. 


11 

5&11 

5&11 


Tuesday, June 26 
Wednesday, June 27 
Thursday, June 28 


8:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 

11 
11 


Friday, June 29 


8:30 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 


9 
11 


Saturday, June 30 


1:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 


Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 


9 
5&11 


Sunday, July 1 


2:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 


Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 


9 
5&11 


Monday, July 2 
Tuesday, July 3 


8:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 
Phila. vs. Giants 


11 
11 


Wednesday, July 4 


2:00 P.M. 


Giants vs. D'gers 
(double header) 


9 




2:00 P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yank, 
(double header) 


5&11 


Thursday, July 5 


8:30 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 


Giants vs. D'gers 
Wash. vs. Yank. 


9 
11 


Friday, July 6 
Saturday, July 7 
Sunday, July 8 


1:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 


Boston vs. Giants 
Boston vs. Giants 
Boston vs. Giants 


11 
11 
11 



1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 

Teasing, tongue-twisting Garry coaxes laughs as- 
sisted by Durward Kirby, Denise Lor. 

2:30 P.M. First Hundred Years • 2 

TV serial about trials of young married love, 
played by Jimmy Lydon and Olive Stacey. 

3:00 P.M. Miss Susan • 4 

Story of a young woman lawyer who is confined 
to a wheelchair. 

3:30 P.M. Bert Parks Show • 4 

The dynamic entertainer sparks song, dance and 
laughs with Betty Ann Grove, Bobby Sherwood. 

4:00 P.M. Kate Smith Show • 4 

Kate, aided by Ted Collins, with an hour 
crammed full of news, music and fashion. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200 • 4 

Day-by-day story of life in a typical small Amer- 
ican town. 

5:30 P.M. Howdy Boody • 4 

Howdy, puppet hero, with creator Bob Smith. 

7:00 P.M. Hukla, Fran and Ollie • 4 

Fran Allison shares the stage with Kuklapolitans. 

7:15 P.M. Faye Emerson • 4 

Interviews by the fascinating first lady of TV. 
(M, W & F) 

7:30 P.M. Mohawk Showroom • 4 

Roberta Quinlan, singing and looking like an 
angel. (M, W & F) 

7:45 P.M. Perry Como • 2 

Perry sings hits of today and yesterday. (M, W 
& F) 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 

John Cameron Swayze with the day's events. 



«SSS**» 



8:00 P.M. Lux TV Theatre • 2 

Dramatic stories cast with outstanding stars. 

8:00 P.M. Paul Winehell Show • 4 

Musical variety-quiz review with Paul and his 
saucy alter ego, Jerry Mahoney. 

8:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Arthur gives assistance to talented stars-to-be. 

8:30 P.M. Voice of Firestone • 4 

Concerts by distinguished artists. 

9:30 P.M. The Goldbergs • 2 

Gertrude Berg in the warm role of Molly. 

9:30 P.M. Robert Montgomery Presents • 4 

Montgomery is host of a star-studded drama. Bi- 
weekly: June 11 & 25, July 9. Alternating with: 
Somerset Maugham Theater 

Full hour dramas from the works of the renowned 
author. Biweekly: June 18 & July 2. 

10:00 P.M. Summer Theater • 2 

Reruns of best TV dramas and light comedies. 



75 




Program 
highlights 
in television 
viewing 



New York City and suburbs, June 11 • July 10 



Baseball Schedule For Television Viewing 



DAY 



TIME 



GAME 



Tuesday, June 12 2:30 P.M. St. Louis vs. Yank 

Wednesday, June 13 2:30 P.M. St. Louis vs. Yank 

Thursday, June 14 2:30 P.M. 

Friday, June 15 8:30 P.M. 

Saturday, June 16 2:00 P.M. 



St. Louis vs. Yank. 

Detroit vs. Yank. 
Detroit vs. Yank. 



Sunday, June 17 



2:00 P.M. Detroit vs. Yank. 



Tuesday, June 19 2:30 P.M. Chicago vs. Yank. 
Wednesday, June 20 2:30 P.M. Chicago vs. Yank. 



Thursday, June 21 

Friday, June 22 
Saturday, June 23 
Sunday, June 24 

Tuesday, June 26 
Wednesday, June 27 
Thursday, June 28 

Friday, June 29 
Saturday, June 30 
Sunday, July 1 

londay, July 2 
Tuesday, July 3 

Wednesday, July 4 



Thursday, July 5 

Friday, July 6 
Saturday, July 7 
Sunday, July 8 



2:30 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 
1 :30 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

8:30 P.M. 
8:30 P.M. 

1:30 P.M. 
1:30 P.M. 
2:00 P.M. 



Chicago vs. Yank. 

C'land vs. Yank. 
C'land vs. Yank. 
C'land vs. Yank. 

Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 

Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 

Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 

Phila. vs. D'gers 
Boston vs. Yank. 

Phila. vs. Giants 
Phila. vs. Giants 

Giants vs. D'gers 
(double header) 

Wash. vs. Yank, 
(double header) 

Giants vs. D'gers 
Wash. vs. Yank. 

Boston vs. Giants 
Boston vs. Giants 
Boston vs. Giants 



CHANNEL 

5&11 
5&11 
5&11 

11 

5&11 

5&11 

5&11 
5&11 
5&11 

11 

5&11 

5&11 

11 
11 
11 

9 
11 

9 
5&11 

9 
5&11 

11 
11 

9 

5&11 

9 
11 

11 
11 
11 




1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 

Teasing, tongue-twisting Garry coaxes laughs as- 
sisted by Durward Kirby, Denise Lor. 

2:30 P.M. First Hundred Years • 2 

TV serial about trials of young married love, 
played by Jimmy Lydon and Olive Stacey. 

3:00 P.M. Miss Susan • 4 

Story of a young woman lawyer who is confined 
to a wheelchair. 

3:30 P.M. Bert Parks Show • 4 

The dynamic entertainer sparks song, dance and 
laughs with Betty Ann Grove, Bobby Sherwood. 

4:00 P.M. Kate Smith Show • 4 

Kate, aided by Ted Collins, with an hour 
crammed full of news, music and fashion. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200 • 4 

Day-by-day story of life in a typical small Amer- 
ican town. 

5:30 P.M. Howdy Boody • 4 

Howdy, puppet hero, with creator Bob Smith. 

7:00 P.M. Kukla, Fran and Ollie • 4 

Fran Allison shares the stage with Kuklapolitans. 

7:15 P.M. Faye Emerson • 4 

Interviews by the fascinating first lady of TV. 
(M, W & F) 

7:30 P.M. Mohawk Showroom • 4 

Roberta Quinlan, singing and looking like an 
angel. (M, W & F) 

7:45 P.M. Perry Como • 2 

Perry sings hits of today and yesterday. (M, W 
& F) 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 

John Cameron Swayze with the day's events. 



15550^ 



8:00 P.M. Lux TV Theatre • 2 

Dramatic stories cast with outstanding stars. 

8:00 P.M. Paul Winehell Show • 4 

Musical variety-quiz review with Paul and his 
saucy alter ego, Jerry Mahoney. 

8:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Arthur gives assistance to talented stars-to-be. 

8:30 P.M. Voice of Firestone • 4 

Concerts by distinguished artists. 

9:30 P.M. The Goldbergs • 2 

Gertrude Berg in the warm role of Molly. 

9:30 P.M. Robert Montgomery Presents • 4 

Montgomery is host of a star-studded drama. Bi- 
weekly: June 11 & 25, July 9. Alternating with: 

Somerset Maugham Theater 
Full hour dramas from the works of the renowned 
author. Biweekly: June 18 & July 2. 

10:00 P.M. Summer Theater • 2 

Reruns of best TV dramas and light comedies. 



75 




R 
M 

76 



7:30 P.M. The Little Show • 4 

Songs and chatter, starring vocalist John Conte 
with the Three Beaus and the Peep. Conte, who 
now passes himself off as a New Yorker, was born 
in Massachusetts and raised in California. (T, 
Th.) 

7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

Ethel Waters, author of best-selling book, His 
Eye is on the Sparrow, in title role of family 
comedy. Others: Butterfly McQueen, William 
Post, Jr., Ginger Jones, Percy Harris, Clifford 
Sales. 

8:00 P.M. Texaco Star Theater • 4 

Bubbling, sparkling Milton Berle, who recently 
signed a 30-year contract with NBC, with a 
speed-paced variety show featuring top talent. 

8:30 P.M. Johns Hopkins Science Review • 5 

Absorbing, award-winning science program orig- 
inating ffom Baltimore, home of the famous uni- 
versity. Host Lynn Poole introduces different 
scientists who for thirty minutes demonstrate 
such varying topics as freezing the atom to fear 
reaction but always in the understandable lan- 
guage of the layman. 

9:00 P.M. Vaughn Monroe Show • 2 

A superb, entertaining revue with vocalist Shaye 
Cogan, dancer Kenny Davis, comics Ziggy Talent 
and Ada Lynne and starring Monroe, who studied 
classical voice for year then painstakingly had to 
unlearn everything to sing pop music. 

9:00 P.M. Fireside Theater • 4 

Stories filmed in Hollywood, emphasizing the un- 
canny, unexpected tricks of fate that suddenly 
skyrocket people into bizarre situations. 

9:00 P.M. Cavalcade ot Bands • 5 

Former screen star, Buddy Rogers, once a band- 
leader himself, plays host to Xavier Cugat, his 
orchestra and soloists on June 12, 19 and 26. 

9:00 P.M. Q. E. B. • 7 

Fred Uttal, announcer on Mr. D.A. for eleven 
years, emcees this panel show presenting problems 
in the realm of crime and mystery. Regular 
members : Hi Brown, producer of Inner Sanctum, 
Harold Hoffman, ex-Governor of New Jersey, 
renowned stage star, Nina Foch, and guests. 

9:30 P.M. Lite Begins at Eighty • 7 

Jack Barry, of Juvenile Jury fame, at the other 
extreme with serious and humorous problems for 
Georgiana Carhart, 85 and one-time concert sing- 
er, John Dranuy, 90, former railroad engineer, 
Fred Stein, 82, still active as a realtor. 

9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 

Tense atmosphere and a spine-tingling story 
makes this a real chiller. Robert Stevens directs. 

9:30 P.M. Circle Theatre • 4 

Nelson Case, who was a senior announcer at 
seventeen, is your handsome host to star-cast 
plays about real people in everyday situations. 

10:00 P.M. Banger • 2 

Absorbing mystery and adventure stories directed 
by Sidney Lument, 26-year-old New Yorker. 

10:00 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 

The spotlight turns on the three-time winners for 
the annual competition for the $2,000 scholarship 
and Gold Trophy Award. Ted Mack is emcee. 




Vtfedn 



7:30 P.M. Chance ot a Litetime • 7 

Magnanimous John Reed King, prince of quiz- 
masters with questions that pay off in prizes and 
savings bonds worth up to $5,000. Pretty Cindy 
Cameron assists John along with comedian Dick 
Collier and song-dance team, Russell Arms and 
Liza Palmer, TV's youngest, successful couple. 

8:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 

The one-man industry mixes in a surprise guest 
with his bright pals Janette Davis, Haleloke, 
Marion Marlowe, Tony Marvin, Archie Bleyer 
and Frank Parker, the tenor star of the thirties. 

8:00 P.M. Four Star Revue • 4 

Top howl-provokers in a big, dance-musical fest. 
Comedians rotate: June 13, To be announced; 
June 20, Danny Thomas; June 27, Ed Wynn; 
July 4, Jack Carson; July 11, TBA. 

9:00 P.M. Charlie Wild • 2 

The rough and ready, fast-talking investigator in 
tales of crime. Title role played by John Mc- 
Quade, who has also been seen in TV's Sure as 
Fate, Starlight Theater, and the Hellinger movie, 
"The Naked City." 

9:00 P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

One of the first and one of the best dramatic 
shows on TV, cast with actors and actresses 
known for their excellence of performance rather 
than for their "name" value. 

9:00 P.M. Bon McNeill TV Club • 7 

Frank, friendly Don with his skill and charm 
visits with the audience, presents a star from 
show business. In addition clowning Sam Cow- 
ling, Fran (Aunt Fanny) Allison, handsome 
baritone Johnny Desmond, pretty Patsy Lee, Cliff 
Petersen and Eddie Ballantine's orchestra. 

9:30 P.M. The Web • 2 

Hard-hitting who-dunits culled from the best 
works of the Mystery Writers of America. Frank- 
lin Heller, a Connecticut commuter, directs. 

9:30 P.M. The Plainclothesman • 5 

Adventure drama stressing realistic crime de- 
tection with Ken Lynch in the title role, although 
only his voice is heard while the camera func- 
tions as his eye. Jack Orrison is seen and heard 
as Sgt. Brady. 

9:30 P.M. Wrestling front Chicago • 7 

From the Rainbo Arena in Windy City, grunts by 
grapplers who excel in dramer and mellerdramer. 
Wayne Griffin, who announces, likes wrestling 
but claims he has developed an allergy to pretzels 
from his present assignment. 

10:00 P.M. international Boxing Club • 2 

Expert sport announcer, Russ Hodges, reports 
"Blue Ribbon" bouts originating from Chicago 
Stadium, Detroit Olympia, St. Louis Arena, and 
New York City's St. Nicholas Arena. 

10:00 P.M. Breuh the Bank • 4 

Bert Parks, who broke into show business as a 
child in an amateur show, poses ten questions 
worth ten to 500 dollars plus an extra chance to 
break the big cash bank. Bud Collyer is present 
along with Peter Van Steeden's band. 

10:30 P.M. Stars Over Hollywood • 4 

Filmed in the motion picture capital especially 
for video. Original comedies and light dramas 
cast with newcomers as well as established stars. 



i 






. 



fhur! 



7:1 5 P.M. Lilli Palmer • 2 

The ingratiating Miss Palmer with charming sim- 
plicity reads poetry, converses with guests. Her 
chief private interest, besides husband, Rex 
Harrison, and son, Carey, is painting in oils. 

7:30 P.M.. Lone Ranger • 7 

With his miraculous silver bullets and trusty 
scout, Tonto, the masked rider champions the 
cause of justice in westerns filmed in Hollywood. 

8:00 P.M. Starlight Theater • 2 

Well-known stars in tales of love, directed by 
Yul Brynner, who plays in "The King and I." 
Biweekly : June 14 & 28. Alternating with : 
Burns and Allen 

Gracie says she would gladly play golf with 
George if there were shops along the fairway 
and this inimical humor runs through the show. 
Biweekly: June 21 & July 5. 

8:00 P.M. You Bet Your Life • 4 

It's just about worth your life to compete for 
cash and bonds worth up to $6,000 when Groucho 
puts you through his devastating third degree 
but it makes for belly laughs for the audience. 

8:00 P.M. Stop the Music • 7 

Bert Parks, assisted by Marion Morgan, Jimmy 
Blaine and Betty Ann Grove, query the nation 
for "mystery tune" worth $15,000 in prizes. 

8:30 P.M. Amos »«» Andy • 2 

On June 28, the premiere TV presentation of the 
famed radio program. The beloved characters 
created and performed by Gosden and Correll 
will be portrayed by outstanding Negro actors. 

9:00 P.M. Alan Young Show • 2 

Alan with his ingenious comedy sketches that 
make grand entertainment for the family. 

9:00 P.M. Ford Festival • 4 

James Melton, top star of radio, opera and con- 
cert stage, in an hour musical jamboree as the 
cast takes imaginary tours throughout the world. 

9:00 P.M. Ellery Queen • 5 

Suave criminologist, Ellery, played by screen 
actor Lee Bowman, unravels the deadly chain of 
events that occur weekly. 

9:00 P.M. Holiday Hotel • 7 

Music and laughs run rampant as Don Ameche 
manages his mythical hotel. Betty Brewer vocal- 
izes, assisted by the Don Craig Chorus. Howls 
provoked by Joshua Shelley and Florence Halop. 

9:30 P.M. Big Town • 2 

Pat McVey, who broke away from a law prac- 
tice for a stage career, as the crime-cracking 
newsman. Pretty Mary K. Wells as Lorelei. 

9:30 P.M. Blind Date • 7 

A competitive show for men in which the prizes 
• are dates with lovely models. Arlene Francis, 
mother of a young son, is moderator. 



10:00 P.M. Truth or Consequences • 2 

Ralph Edwards, three times voted the best 
dressed man in show business, admits he hasn't 
a hat to his name, but takes the lid off the 
uproarious frenzy of TOC once a week. 

lO:0O P.M. Martin Kane • 4 

From the quiet tobacco shop, operative Kane, 
William Gargan, begins his unerring sleuthing. 




8:00 P.M. Mama • 2 

Peggy Wood, who broke into show business by 
auditioning for Oscar Hammerstein's first pro- 
duction of "Naughty Marietta," stars in the title 
role of this heart-warming series. 

8:00 P.M. Quiz Kids • 4 

From Chicago, the winsome junior geniuses an- 
swer and work out clever visual problems posed 
by congenial Joe Kelly. Regular panel members : 
Harvey Dytch, age 7; Joel Kupperman, age 14. 

8:30 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

Mike Barnett launches his action-packed, one- 
man crusade against crime. Mike is played by 
Ralph Bellamy, who has worked in the past as 
a bell boy, soda jerker, farm hand and reporter. 

8:30 P.M. We, the People • 4 

Dan Seymour is friendly host to exciting vig- 
nettes of real people, both famous and unknown, 
with Oscar Bradley's orchestra. Dynamic Dan got 
started in his career by acquiring a college de- 
gree, a wife and radio job on the same day. 

9:00 P.M. Ford Theater • 2 

Leading Broadway and Hollywood artists fill the 
major roles of elaborately wrought dramas that 
draw on the reservoir of literary classics for 
material. Biweekly: June 15 & 29. 

9:00 P.M. Big Story • 4 

Exciting, documentary dramatizations of real 
reporters making headlines, portrayed by actors. 
June 15, from St. Louis Globe-Democrat. A. B. 
Hendry's story of brother-sister hatred that cul- 
minates with an insurance murder; June 22, 
from Philadelphia Daily News, Frank ToughilFs 
story of the love potion clue that uncovered 200 
arsenic murders; June 29, last show before 
summer hiatus, to be announced. 

9:00 P.M. Pulitzer Prize Playhouse • 7 

Handsomely staged, masterly cast dramas from 
the writings of winners of the Pulitzer Award. 
Brooklyn-born director, Alex Segal, reveals that 
as much as five weeks' work goes into one show. 

9:30 P.M. Henry Morgan Show • 4 

Hank's newest show, stacked to the hilt with 
young character actor Art Carney, singing 
comedienne Kay Ballard, vocalist Dorothy Claire, 
dancer Dorothy Jarnac, and, of course, the un- 
impressible Gerard, played by Arnold Stang. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Sports • 4 

A screen-side seat to fights staged by match- 
maker Al Weill, of the International Boxing 
Club. Jimmy Powers, sport columnist of the 
New York Daily News, handles the announcing. 



10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 

A happy variety show with laughman Jackie 
Gleason, once an all night disc jockey till he got 
too lonely on the job. Regulars: Don Russell 
and the dazzling June Taylor dancers. 

10:00 P.M. Studs' Place • 7 

Chicago-style TV. The scene, a little neighbor- 
hood restaurant. Ad lib lines by Studs Terkel & 
friends. 

10:45 P.M. Greatest Fights of the Century • 4 

Historical boxing bouts recorded on film: June 
15, Tony Zale vs. Rocky Graziano (third fight) ; 
June 22, Joe Louis vs. Max Baer; June 29, Joe 
Louis vs. Max Schmeling (second fight) ; July 
6, Jack Dempsey vs. Gene Tunney (second fight.) 



77 




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11:30 A.M. Bate with Judy • 7 

Another well-liked radio show premieres on TV, 
the family comedy revolving around teen-age 
Judy, written and produced by Aleen Leslie. 

12:00 Noon Big Top • 2 

Mustachioed Jack Sterling as whistle-blowing 
ringmaster of sensational circus .novelty acts. 
Clowns Ed McMahon and Chris Keegan. 

12:30 P.M. Faith Baldwin's Theater • 7 

The popular authoress is host and narrator to 
romantic stories cast with prominent actors. Bi- 
weekly: June 23 & July 27. Alternating with — 

I Cover Times Square 
Stage and screen actor Harold Huber in the role 
of Johnny Warren, ace Broadway columnist, 
unfolding intimate tales of the Great White Way. 

7:00 P.M. Sam Levenson Show • 2 

Sam's madcap airing of parents' complaints 
against their children that really turns into the 
problem of "bringing up parents." 

7:00 P.M. Victor Borge Show • 4 

Fully guaranteed to double you up with laughter 
and then again fascinate you with his gifted 
piano. Both Borge's parents were musicians, his 
father was a violinist with the Danish Symphony. 

7:30 P.M. One Man's Family • 2 

The famed family show, first aired on radio 19 
years ago, with Bert Lytell as Henry Barbour; 
Marjorie Gateson as mother Fanny. 

7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin's Show • 7 

A domestic comedy about nice people with calm, 
easy-going Stu as the woe-beset father. Mrs. 
Erwin (June Collyer) is his video wife, too. 

0:00 P.M. Ken Murray Show • 2 

Ken, officially Hollywood's good-will ambassador 
to New York, his birthplace, with funful variety 
featuring "glamourlovelies" and Darla Hood. 

0:00 P.M. Band of Tomorrow • 4 

Freddy Martin, top bandleader, with a new twist 
in TV. From the outstanding amateur musicians 
in the East, he will week by week select a man 
for the band of tomorrow. 

0:00 P.M. TV Teen Club • 7 

"The world is their oyster," Paul Whiteman says 
of the youngsters and proves it with exuberant 
entertainment featuring blonde Nancy Lewis, 
June Keegan and Sonny Graham. 

9:00 P.M. Frank Sinatra Show • 2 

Frankie dreamed of being a reporter till he saw 
his first Crosby movie. Latest venture is his 
wonderful show with guest stars plus songstress 
June Hutton and Alex Stordahl's orchestra. 

9:00 P.M. Ben Blue's Barn Theater • 4 

Blue lends his pixilated antics to a cast that is 
supposedly preparing summer stock. Singing 
comedienne Roberta Lee and Matty Malneck. 

10:00 P.M. Sing It Again • 2 

Comic Jan Murray, setting the pace in laughs, 
with gay song-quiz offering big savings bonds for 
identification of the Phantom Voice. 

10:00 P.M. Boodles Weaver Show • 4 

Doodles, who combines his warmth with wild, 
berated clowning, wanders vaguely among his 
stooges, Peanuts Mann, Red Marshall and Dick 
Davis. 



Sunday 



4:00 P.M. Meet the Press • 4 

Headline press conference for thinking people 
as reporters blast away at news personalities. 

4:30 P.M. Zoo Parade • 4 

The stars may be tiny jumping mice or rope- 
walking snakes in this show from Chicago's 
Lincoln Park Zoo. R. Marlin Perkins is M.C. 

5:00 P.M. Gabby Hayes Show • 4 

Irrepressible Gabby spins a yarn of American 
History to Clifford Sales and Lee Graham then 
usually goes out on a limb with a tall tale. 



tn tnen 
y, star- 



0:00 P.M. Hopalong Cassidy • 4 

Films of straight-shootin', fearless Hoppy, 
ring veteran Bill Boyd, who once worked as a 
surveyor and tool dresser in Oklahoma oil fields. 

7:00 P.M. Gene Autry • 2 

Western romance and action filmed for TV. The 
popular cowboy troubador credits singing suc- 
cess to his preacher-grandfather. 

7:00 P.M. Paul "Whiteman Bevue • 7 

Pops waves his musical wand at Earl Wrightson, 
Maureen Cannon, Ray Porter Chorus and dancers 
directed by Frank Westbrook. 

7:30 P.M. This is Show Business • 2 

Unique variety featuring a show business clinic 
hosted by Clifton Fadiman, literary critic. 

7:30 P.M. Aldrieh Family • 4 

The long-popular family comedy starring Dick 
Tyler as ever-optimistic Henry; Jackie Kelk, in 
private life a farmer, as muddling Homer. 

0:00 P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 

Columnist Ed Sullivan, who branched out into 
show business in the early 30's, presents great 
variety, with the "Toastettes" and Ray Bloch. 

0:00 P.M. Comedy Hour • 4 

Rousing extravaganza of music and comedy with 
different comedians each Sunday. June 17, Eddie 
Cantor; June 24, and last show before summer 
hiatus, the hilarious Martin and Lewis, 



. 



9:00 P.M. Fred Waring Show • 2 

Smooth, distinctive hour of dance and music wit! 
the famous Glee Club, lyric soprano Jane Wilson, 
vocalists Joe Marine, Daisy Bernier. 



9:00 P.M. Phileo Playhouse • 4 

Full hour dramatization of great stories with 
great performers. Directed by Gordon Duff. 

10:00 P.M. Celebrity Time • 2 

Conrad Nagel lends his gracious skill to umpir- 
ing a game-and-fun session with regulars, singer 
Mary McCarty, Yale coach Herman Hickman. 

10:00 P.M. Garroway at Large • 4 

The unexpected is expected in Dave Garroway's 
inspired show featuring vocal-lovelies Connie 
Russell and Betty Chapel, baritone Jack Haskell. 

10:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 

Guess-your-occupation quiz with sword swallow- 
ers, duck pluckers, wig-makers, challenging 
rotating panelists. John Daly moderates. 

At the time we go to press, networks are 
still uncertain as to when some programs 
will take their customary summer vacation. 
It is possible several programs may be off 
the air prior to publication of this issue. 








Luxtovd/ 









CO-STARRING IN 

"GOODBYE MY FANCY" 

A WARNER BROS'. PRODUCTION 






This beauty care makes my skin softer, smoother J 










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THE PLEASURE TO PRESENT 



(Continued from page 29) Paul Winchell, 
Luise Rainer, Irving Berlin, Rudy Vallee, 
Faye Emerson, Billy Eckstine and dozens 
more. 

No showman of old could match the 
quality of attractions that have appeared 
on Toast. Ziegfeld put on one musical a 
year; in TV, you have to put on fifty -two 
separate shows. On our stage we've had 
exhibited Gloria Swanson, Moira Shearer, 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Margaret Truman, 
Sarah Churchill, Margot Fonteyn, Mel- 
chior, Rise Stevens, Melton, the Notre 
Dame Glee Club, Hedy Lamarr, Lena 
Home — no producer ever has had the 
bankroll to produce such "names" week 
after week because no producer ever be- 
fore had a Detroit automobile factory as 
his "angel." 

For many of them, taking the first 
plunge into the new medium pre- 
sented a problem. It took a great deal of 
persuasion on my part in some cases. It 
was almost a year ago that I first contacted 
Margaret Truman's manager. The Presi- 
dent's daughter had turned down many TV 
offers. Her chief reason for refusing was 
an honest fear of exploiting her father's 
position. Luckily for me, opera singer 
Mimi Benzell's husband saw an associate 
of Margaret's manager. Mimi had made 
her TV debut on Toast and her husband 
came to my aid. 

"Mimi found it a great opportunity," he 
said. "Ed presented her with dignity and 
in good taste." 

The recommendation carried a lot of 
weight and her manager, Jim Davidson, 
arranged to have me meet Margaret at 
lunch. My first reaction to the President's 
daughter was that newspaper pictures 
didn't do her justice. She is a handsome, 
blue-eyed blonde with delicate coloring. 

We talked about her appearance on the 
show and suggested her doing a sketch. 

"I'd be making a big mistake not to 
sing," she countered. 

I agreed with her. We had hoped she 
would sing. And as we talked it was ob- 
vious that Margaret had a mind of her 
own and wanted to make good on her own 
like many other children of famous people. 

"I don't want any reference made tp 
my father," Margaret said before the show. 

It was to be her own debut and I made 
that clear to Victor Borge, who was appear- 
ing on the same program. (He had to forego 
one of his Harry S. Beethoven gags.) 

That night she sang "O'er the Hill" and 
"My Johann." She was wonderful. Even 
reluctant Republicans stopped to say, "I 
may not like her old man's politics but 
the girl's fine." Our orchestra leader, Ray 
Bloch, said that he had never worked with 
anyone, excepting ballerina Moira Shearer, 
who understood her music so well. 

People ask me if Margaret Truman was 
nervous. The answer is yes. But in my 
experience all of the good professionals 
are nervous before they go on. If there 
is one exception, it is Victor Borge. The 
Droll Dane just can't repress himself 
when people get serious. In a way, this 
quirk accounts for his double-threat ca- 
reer as humorist and pianist. 
" Victor was steeped in fine music from 
the day he was born in Copenhagen. His 

^_ father was a violinist in the Danish Royal 
80 ' 



Symphony but Victor preferred to take 
piano lessons from his equally talented 
mother. At the age of ten he made a con- 
cert debut and at fifteen he was given the 
honor of playing a Rachmaninoff Concerto 
with the state symphony. In the middle of 
the concerto, there was a long, two-finger 
piano trill with the full string section 
sawing away behind him. The intensity 
of the musicians was too much for Victor 
and he looked at the audience over his 
shoulder and winked. There was a roar of 
laughter. Victor was reprimanded but ever 
since he has been combining good music 
and wonderful pranks. 

"I just want to let a little bit of oxygen 
in on brilliant music," he explains. 

A U. S. citizen now, Victor came to the 
states in 1940 to escape the Nazis. His 
first appearance was in my stage revue, 
"Crazy with the Heat." Because he's a self- 
designated jester, his antics are unpre- 
dictable. During rehearsals, everyone, in- 
cluding the sponsors, are doubled over 
with laughter. He will lead the orchestra 
through a havoc of mischords or rush down 
the aisle to don an usher's cap when the 
audience comes in. 

But Victor is the exception. High-calibre 
entertainers are serious hardworking men 
like Gordon Jenkins and Phil Spitalny. 
Spitalny will devote three weeks of hard 
work to one show. He makes special ar- 
rangements, calls rehearsals that go into 
the night and, usually, puts the final touch 
on his girls with new gowns that cost 
about three hundred dollars each. 

Vaughn Monroe, who also made his TV 
debut with us, is another example of an 
artist who believes in thorough prepara- 
tion. He's at the top of his profession but 
when it comes to rehearsals he's as punc- 
tual and serious as a young man applying 
for his first job. 

Another great performer was Charles 
Laughton, a grand man although he pre- 
tends to be gruff. He fumes and rants but 
at heart he is a very mild person. I knew 
that, but even so he tried to shock me when 
we sat down to discuss what he would do 
on the show. 

"I'd like to read from the Bible," he 
said, then sneered, "But I guess that's 
impossible on a variety show." 

But I had the pleasure of shocking him. 
"Sounds like a very good idea," I told 
him. "Fitting for a Sunday show, too." 

Of course, with Laughton, you can 
be sure no matter what he does, it 
will be good theater. In the case of the 
Bible reading, it was so dramatic that our 
staff still talks about it. When he came 
back for a second show, I told him about 
one of our talented young finds, Frank Fon- 
taine, who does a wonderful impersona- 
tion of Laughton's Captain Bligh. 

"Never!" Laughton roared, jumping to 
a natural conclusion. "He can't do the 
impersonation on the same show with me." 

I said quickly, "I only want you to 
watch him during rehearsal for your own 
enjoyment." 

So Laughton stood scowling in the wing 
while Fontaine, who is now a member of 
the Jack Benny cast, began the impersona- 
tion. Suddenly, Laughton rushed out on the 
stage shouting, "Stop! Stop!" 

And then Laughton went on, "This is 



M 



the way we'll do it tonight. You'll do the 
impersonation and I'll come on the stage 
as if I were about to murder you for being 
impertinent." 

And on he went to outline a comedy 
sketch that was one of the funniest I've 
ever seen. It was the kind of act we wanted 
but had little hope of Laughton's agreeing. 

Frankie Laine was probably the most 
nervous person we ever had on the show. 
At the time, his recordings of "Mule 
Train" and "Cry of the Wild Goose" were 
among the biggest hits in the country. But 
his agents were in the midst of arranging 
bookings and the impression he was about 
to make would affect the negotiations. 

Frankie naturally has the vitality of a 
dozen men. His whole body vibrates when 
he sings. So we focused on these very 
characteristics. As he began singing, the 
camera caught his expressive hands and 
underlined the very physical characteris- 
tics that make his voice so exciting. He 
was terrific but again he was one who 
had been far from keen about TV. 

r Y argument to convince stars that 
they should appear on the show 
merely boils down to this: I wouldn't be 
asking them if I didn't think they were 
going to be good. I'm not a rival comedian, 
singer or dancer. My job is to put to- 
gether the best possible show but in the 
final analysis it's the entertainers who 
must satisfy. 

Glamour girls present another problem. 
I use "glamour" advisedly for the word 
perfectly describes such women as Gloria 
Swanson and Hedy Lamarr. What they 
fear most about appearing on TV is the 
kinescope. Actresses rightfully known for 
beauty sometimes find themselves on kine- 
scope with a tattletale-gray look. It's my 
job to persuade them that competent 
cameramen can overcome this. 

Gloria Swanson was scheduled for our 
show about the time "Sunset Boulevard" 
was opening in the major cities. She was 
touring with the picture and took ill in 
Chicago just a few days before the Sun- 
day show. Looking for an actress with 
the same kind of appeal, I thought of 
Hedy Lamarr who was vacationing at 
Southampton with her children. I've known 
Hedy since 1938. Although she's truly 
an exotic bundle of beauty, I know her to 
be a real trouper and a good friend. I put 
in a call to her. 

"Ed, I don't want to do television," she 
said. "Frankly, I'm afraid of it and that's 
one reason my fee is so high." 

I explained that Gloria Swanson's ill- 
ness had put me in an unenviable spot. 

"If you need me, I'll do it," she said. 
"And you can write your own ticket." 

That's the type of gesture few people 
understand. Some think of me as a news- 
paper columnist who just happens to be 
on TV introducing acts. That's far from 
the truth. For the past twenty years I have 
been staging vaudeville, radio and benefit 
shows and I have only one assistant who 
helps book the show, Mark Ledy, a special- 
ist in novelty acts. 

All in all, I'm very proud of the show 
and the team that puts it together each 
week. You'd have a hard time convincing 
any of us that vaudeville is dead. Consider- 
ing that our audience has been growing 
by the millions in the past two years, I 
expect Toast of the Town to be around a 
long time — with vaudeville. 



TV FOR CHILDREN 

(Continued from page 27) But such tan- 
trums are not new with TV — children have 
been thinking up excuses to get out of 
going to bed since the beginning of time. 
So the blame can't be put on the medium 
but on the parents. 

As to the effect of TV on your child's 
education, it is obvious that the main 
damage is done by indiscriminate viewing. 
You may have taught your child that fight- 
ing is vulgar and death a great sorrow, yet 
the child can be completely fascinated by 
western films, murder mysteries, boxing 
and wrestling — simply because they're pre- 
sented in his own living room by means 
of a picture that moves. One of the best 
ways of putting a stop to indiscriminate 
viewing is to work out a schedule of pro- 
grams with your child. It is important that 
you choose them together — your child will 
seize the opportunity to cooperate. Yet you 
will not have hurt his feelings by laying 
down the law. 

TV is literally abounding in instruction- 
al programs. Children everywhere have re- 
ported learning to knit, sew, cook, build 
bird houses — all from watching right TV. 

If your child is too little to help choose 
a schedule, there are other ways. You 
might invite other children over to the 
house for some good programs, then turn 
the set off and divert interest with cookies 
and milk — this is good early social training. 

A well-known New York physician rec- 
ommends that children under six be kept 
strictly on a bland TV diet — no horror pro- 
gram, only puppet shows, gay films, and 
circuses. This may be your cure for those 
nightmares and nervous tensions. 

Since it is inevitable that teen-age chil- 
dren are going to watch some mystery 
programs, I have made it my responsi- 
bility to see what the individual television 
networks are doing by way of censorship. 

First, I went to the American Broad- 
casting Company to see Grace Johnsen, 
head of continuity acceptance. 

Television is generally censored by the 
same standards as radio, Miss Johnsen 
avers, but she also keeps one eye on mo- 
tion picture standards. The difficulty there 
is that movies often contain more violence 
than is welcome in a living room. 

At all of the television networks I was 
allowed to see their files of complaints. 
Every network sees that complaints are 
delivered to the right people and action 
is taken. Without these complaints the 
people in these departments would have 
nothing to go by for a standard. 

Doing their bit to solve the problem of 
TV for children, the networks usually 
schedule a block of children's programs 
in the late afternoon — all taking the same 
pattern, beginning with programs for tots 
first and progressing through dramatic 
programs at eight and eight-thirty for 
the older children. With a few exceptions, 
this also holds true on local TV stations. 

Actually, there is nothing to fear about 
what TV is doing to our children. There is 
no evil brought on by the television age 
that can't be remedied — read your program 
listings, exercise your right to turn the 
dial; let the networks know what you 
prefer to see; and last but far from least 
. . . enjoy your new privilege of having a 
tighter family circle through the mutual 
pleasure of watching TV with your children. 




because 



AA>f PLA^CloTHES LOO< 

So WETTY "WP ^eHTVlvs 






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81 




A 



HOLLYWOOD'S 
LOVELIEST LEGS! 

See them in JULY 

PHOTOPLAY 

at Newsstands NOW 

Hollywood's most eligible 
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• FARLEY GRANGER • MACDONALD CAREY 

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Rules for making your summer romance 
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A !u L L ; N photoplay 

Now at your Newsstands 



CALL ME MOTHER! 



(Continued from page 65) the slightest 
hesitation I said, "Honey, just start heating 
up the coffee. I'll be on your doorstep by 
noon tomorrow." 

And off I went. Something like that was 
always happening. To me home meant my 
address and telephone number. 

But that was before I married Lou Bush. 

Lou is the kind of man every girl's 
mother dreams of as a son-in-law. The idea 
of a family and home is terribly important 
to him. In fact you might say he's a mite 
old-fashioned about the whole thing. I 
guess that's why I fell in love with him. 

Maybe that sounds paradoxical, since I 
had always considered myself a modern 
independent woman, but the way I figure 
it, until I met Lou I just wasn't grown up 
enough to know what I really wanted. 

So here I am, Mrs. Lou Bush. And 
now, the mother of a most wonder- 
ful blue-eyed baby daughter named De- 
borah Louise — Debbie for short — and I 
love it! In fact I'm so sold on being a mother 
that I go around insisting that all our friends 
must start right in having babies. 

Lou says I sound as if motherhood were 
an idea I invented myself. And sometimes 
I almost feel as if I did. I guess most new 
mothers feel this way, and I'll probably 
simmer down after a while. 

Naturally people ask me whether or not 
I expect children to interfere with my 
career. My answer is "Not at all." As far 
as I am concerned, Debbie hasn't inter- 
fered one whit. She has enriched it. 

For one thing, I feel better physically 
than I ever have. My figure is trimmer than 
it's ever been, and Lou says it's made me 
absolutely glowy all over. People I haven't 
seen for a long time remark about how 
healthy, happy and relaxed I look. 

It's true. The changes are visible in my 
personality as well. I seem to be more in- 
terested in people and more at ease with 
them. 

I remember something a business ac- 
quaintance said to me just a few weeks 
ago. He had come to the house to discuss 
a television idea. Instead of our usual small 
talk about show business, for almost an 
hour my visitor sat there with me, dis- 
cussing the various problems and de- 
lights of parenthood, and I found my- 
self terribly interested in the stories he 
told about his kids and I found myself 
becoming aware of him as a real person 
and not just a vague personality who repre- 
sented another side of show business. 

"You know," he said to me finally, and 
there was new respect in his voice, "this 
is the first time I've noticed what an 
attractive woman you are. Attractive as 
a woman that is. Not as a singer. That 
you've always been. But that on-stage per- 
sonality of yours, vital as it is, can't hold a 
candle to the charm you have when you 
relax and let the woman in you take over." 

When he left, I put Debbie back in her 
crib and thought about what my visitor had 
said. And about all the things that had 
happened to me in the past year . . . 

First there was Lou. An old friendship 
ripening into love. The beginning was all 
very casual. I enjoyed my dates with him 
tremendously, but I was still "Fiddlefoot 
Maggie" as my mother used to call me. 
"She travels fastest who travels alone," 



I reminded myself firmly when I caught 
myself thinking of Lou. 

I began to have more and more dates 
with Lou, and in a short time the courtship 
assumed full regalia. Roses, slim volumes 
of poetry, and huge boxes of chocolates. 
He even composed a song for me. He 
writes wonderful songs, when he isn't busy 
at Capitol Records. 

I was clinging weakly to the last out- 
post of The Independent Woman when he 
asked me to marry him. I said "Yes," just 
like that. We got married a few days later. 

When we discovered that Debbie was on 
the way, Lou was of course delighted, and 
so was I — despite moments of anxiety 
as to whether or not the baby would ar- 
rive without complications. 

I needn't have worried. Everything went 
off like clockwork. Debbie arrived without 
a hitch. All nine pounds of her. 

By the time I could leave the hospital 
there was another addition to our house- 
hold, Mary Turner, an extremely competent 
young nurse who fitted herself into our 
lives with quiet ease. She's not only excel- 
lent with Debbie, but with all of us. 

At first I was terrified at the thought of 
handling such a tiny baby. But Mary as- 
suaged my fears, and within a few days I 
was dressing and changing and bathing 
Debbie like a veteran mother. 

I found myself wanting to do these things, 
not out of a sense of duty, but because 
doing them made me feel important to my 
daughter. Feeling the warm, struggling 
new life under my hands, watching new 
responses was a thrill I had never experi- 
enced. 

Even Lou has his turn at taking care of 
our Debbie. Like most fathers with their 
daughters, Lou is completely enchanted. 
I can tell who's going to play the "heavy" 
if there's any discipline to be meted out. 
It won't be Papa. 

People ask me how I fit motherhood into 
my career. Well, in a manner of speaking 
I think it's the other way around. I am 
fitting my career into motherhood. I'd give 
up doing a show anytime if Debbie needed 
me. 

Actually with a minimum of organiza- 
tion my days aren't too complicated. I 
have my radio shows to do, and twice weekly 
visits to entertain the veterans at the nearby 
hospitals. And outside of a few guest shots 
here and there and interviews, I'm pretty 
much of a homebody. 

Fortunately Lou doesn't feel that a 
wife with a career is a threat to mar- 
riage. We were discussing some recent Hol- 
lywood break-ups with some friends one 
evening and Lou summed up our attitude by 
saying "I don't think wives with careers af- 
fect a good marriage one way or the other. 
The only important thing is to learn to ac- 
cept and respect each other without reserva- 
tion. Just keep concentrating on the positive 
things in a relationship and the little differ- 
ences become completely unimportant." 

That's the way it's been with us. And 
that's why we think Debbie is going to 
grow up into a happy, well-balanced indi- 
vidual. We're going to give her the best 
thing that parents can give any child . . . 
a sense of belonging. And the only way 
that can be done is for there to be real 
harmony between a mother and father. 



D aytime 
diary 





AUNT JENNY In Aunt Jenny's home 
town, Littleton, Walter Browning and Edith 
Hammond grew up in neighboring houses, 
friends from babyhood. To their parents, 
it seemed a foregone conclusion that Edith 
and Walter would fall in love, but the two 
young people, resenting what they felt was 
pressure, went out of their way to choose 
other mates. It was almost too late when 
they realized that in spite of their parents, 
they really did love one another. 

M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



BACKSTAGE WIFE Larry Noble, work- 
ing on a picture in Hollywood, believes 
his wife Mary wants a divorce. Mary, in 
New York, thinks Larry has fallen in love 
with an actress. In her unhappiness she ac- 
cepts an invitation to cruise aboard Rupert 
Barlow's yacht — not realizing that it is 
part of Rupert's plan to widen the breach 
between the Nobles. On the verge of de- 
parture, Mary gets a wire from Larry, ask- 
ing her to come to Hollywood. 

M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



BlGSiSTEMl Has Ruth Wayne finally 
found a powerful ally in her fight against 
millionaire Millard Parker? Parker has 
always had a great fear of his ex-wife, 
Selena, who exercised such a tremendous 
influence over him in spite of his not having 
seen her for many years. When Selena re- 
turns from the Far East, forces begin to 
stir that may end in what Ruth has been 
trying unsuccessfully to accomplish — driv- 
ing Parker out of Glen Falls. 

M-F, 1 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

It It 1 4. NT lilt DAY When the Dennis fam- 
ily moved away from Three Rivers, they 
were looking forward to the more stimulat- 
ing activities that would be open to them 
in the larger town of Plymouth. But now 
Papa Dennis, Rev. Richard Dennis to his 
parishioners, is not so sure the move was 
a wise one. Plymouth is indeed more 
stimulating, but it is also more difficult to 
live peacefully there, particularly when 
the family becomes involved in the strange 
section of town known as Milltown. 
M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

FRONT PAGE FARttELL A hatcheck 
girl, stabbed to death at a bridal shower 
being given to her by her friends — that is 
the startling news story which David Far- 
rell, ace reporter, is sent out to cover. 
Before David is finished, the "April Shower 
Murder Case" takes him and his wife 
Sally through some dangerous experiences, 
involving a strange group of women and 
one of the most ingenious murderers he 
has ever helped bring to justice. 

M-F, 5:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 




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ClIBlVfi LIGHT The past is behind 
Meta Bauer White. Her husband and child 
are dead, and she has survived her own 
trial for murder and has been acquitted on 
the grounds of temporary insanity. But in 
some ways Meta has begun to think that 
her days in prison were restful. Her 
emotional entanglement, plus her family's 
difficulties, are making readjustment to the 
ordinary world very difficult for Meta. 
M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

HILLTOP HOUSE Sometimes Julie 
looks back and wonders how her life might 
have developed if her cousin Nina had 
never come to Hilltop House. Almost as 
Julie realized that she herself loved Jeff 
Browning, Nina used her charms to sweep 
the young into a sudden marriage. Also, 
the revelation that the baby left in Julie's 
care at the orphanage was in reality Nina's 
child, was a shock that Julie has not yet 
gotten over. 

M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

JUST PLAIN BILL Mona Kane and 
her father, Basil Kane, have both confessed 
to the murder of Paul Hewitt, Mona's 
fiance. Bill Davidson's knowledge of human 
nature makes him suspect that Mona and 
her father are simply trying to protect each 
other. There is much consternation when 
Bill, after investigating a bit on his own, 
accuses Amelia Shepherd of the crime. 
M-F, 5:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

KINGS ROW Chief psychiatrist at the 
State Hospital Dr. Parris Mitchell, has 
an intimate knowledge of the lives of his 
neighbors in the little town of Kings Row. 
When distraught Hazel Green becomes his 
patient, Parris learns that Hazel's ruthless 
husband, Fulmer Green, is trying to have 
her declared unfit. What will happen if 
Randy McHugh, Parris' childhood friend, 
manages to help Hazel? 

M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL At last 
Papa David and Chichi can stop worrying 
about the Book Shop. Their home — and 
their means of livelihood — is not going to 
be taken from them. But the enormous 
strain took its toll of Papa David, who 
suffered a series of strokes. He is appar- 
ently well enough, but Chichi will never 
again take his sturdy presence for granted. 
M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

LORENZO JONES Eccentric old Mrs. 
Murphy starts a mysterious chain of trouble 
for herself when she makes a will leaving 
her fortune to her pet cat, Christopher. 
When Christopher suddenly dies, Lorenzo 
suggests that he may have been poiooned, 
whereupon Mrs. Murphy immediately hires 
him to investigate. Belle, Lorenzo's wife, 
is not optimistic about his detecting. 
M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

MA PERKINS What is there about Tom 
Wells that makes Fay unable to forget him, 
though she is engaged to Spencer Grayson? 
For that matter, what is there about Tom 
that Spencer is afraid of? He certainly 
seems concerned when he learns that Tom 
has written a book in which he, Spencer, 
is the chief character. These questions are 
still unanswered when Tom leaves Rush- 
ville Center to go to California. 

M-F, 1 .15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



OUR GAL SUNDAY When Dr. Norman 
Forrest marries Lois Chandler, they decide 
to use the money that nearly came between 
them to build a new hospital in Fairbrooke. 
Lord Henry, Sunday's husband, is to super- 
vise the construction on land donated by 
Spencer Carlyle, one of Fairbrooke's solid 
citizens. It is with considerable astonish- 
ment that Sunday hears him accuse her 
of responsibility for the death of his 
younger brother, whose body is discovered 
on Sunday's estate. 

M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY The 

dreadful strain of Father Young's disap- 
pearance is joyfully relieved when he is 
rescued after having been given up as 
dead. The men involved in the bank rob- 
bery have all been brought to justice — as 
has Mrs. Ivy Trent, who finally confesses 
her important part in the scheme that 
caused the Youngs and their friends so 
much anguish. This creates an unfortunate 
situation, since Ivy is the mother of Carter 
Trent, to whom Pepper's sister Peggy is 
married. 

M-F, 3:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

PERRY MASON As the long, hard fight 
to convict Walter Bodt comes to a trium- 
phant close, Perry makes vacation plans 
which are once again interrupted when he 
is drawn into the "Case of the Martyred 
Mother." What is the horrifying secret be- 
hind the disappearance of May Grant, an 
apparently happy, normal woman, who for 
no reason suddenly leaves her husband? 
As Perry delves into May Grant's story, 
he uncovers a special kind of underworld 
of which the average citizen is unaware? 
M-F, 2:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

PORTIA FACES LIFE Portia Man- 
ning's friends and legal associates would 
never have believed it possible, but it hap- 
pens — her career is abruptly curtailed 
when, on the eve of leaving for a vacation 
trip with Walter, she is accused of having 
bribed witnesses in the case in which she 
was recently involved. In spite of the 
efforts of Mickey Mollyer and the Peroni 
family, the framed case against Portia is 
successful enough to send her to prison. 
M-F, 5:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

RIGHT TO HAPPINESS Carolyn be- 
lieved that marriage to Miles Nelson would 
be the beginning of the happiness she has 
looked forward to all her life. The Nel- 
sons are happy together, but the attack on 
Miles which left him with a bullet dan- 
gerously near his heart has brought new 
difficulties into their lives. As Governor 
of the State, Miles has many duties which 
put a great strain on him. Is Carolyn justi- 
fied in her fear that this strain may prove 
too much for him? 

M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROAD OF LIFE Puzzled by wealthy, er- 
ratic Conrad Overton, Dr. Jim Brent has 
made certain investigations in the man's 
past, and with the help of his friend, editor 
Frank Dana, has uncovered information 
which casts a revealing light on Overton's 
activities and past history. What effect will 
this have on Jim's friendship with Over- 
ton's niece, Joyce McLeod? 

M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 









ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

Helen is heartbroken when Gil Whitney, 
with whom she is still in love, appears 
about to marry Cynthia Swanson. But Gil 
receives a letter from Betty Mallory hinting 
that her secret marriage to Gil, which 
caused so much trouble, was actually a 
hoax. But in spite of the letter Gil cannot 
find Betty, and finally asks Helen to help 
him get in touch with her. Will he go 
through with the marriage to Cynthia? 
M-F. 12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ROSEMARY Unfortunately, the return 
of Rosemary and Bill to Springdale was 
not the idyllic solution Rosemary hoped 
for, and Bill returns to New York to re- 
sume his advertising career. Rosemary's 
friend Blondie, cynically suspecting that 
Bill is still interested in Blanche Weatherby, 
who almost ruined his marriage, tries in 
her own way to cut her out of Bill's 
thoughts. Meanwhile Rosemary waits for 
Bill to send for her. 

M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

SECOND MRS. DURTON For several 

years Terry Burton has been a quiet Dick- 

ston housewife, happy with her husband, 

Stan, with her attractive home and her 

two children, Brad and Wendy. But being 

creative by nature, Terry is pleased when 

she gets an opportunity to go back to 

designing — the career she gave up to 

marry Stan. How will Mrs. Westley, the 

new manager of Stan's store, fit into the 

changed scheme of the Burton's family 

life 9 

M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



STELLA DALLAS Who is trying to 
murder Stella, and for what reason? Laurel 
Grosvenor, Stella's daughter, can give no 
reason, and she is beside herself with 
worry when Stella suddenly disappears. A 
search, headed by Lieutenant Arlen, finds 
Stella just in time to drag her out of the 
abandoned garage where she has been left, 
unconscious, with a car with its motor 
running. Unconscious for days, Stella can 
offer her rescuers no help. 

M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

THIS IS NORA DRAKE Fred Spen- 
cer's plan works to perfection. The fire he 
sets in the Martinson home enables him 
to win back Peg's confidence by making a 
sensational rescue of her. At his instiga- 
tion she then accuses Nora Drake of plot- 
ting to have her murdered, and includes 
her own husband, Dr. Ken Martinson, of 
being part of the plot. Peg, who is a power 
on the board of trustees of Page Memorial 
hospital has Nora and Ken dismissed. 
M-F, 2:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

WENDY WARREN With Mark Douglas 
rescued from Europe and the aftermath 
of his secret assignment, Wendy finally 
admits to herself that he is the man who 
will always mean most to her. But perhaps 
she has made this discovery too late, for 
Mark is a changed man. He seems to care 
about nothing and nobody, and to be en- 
tirely emotionless about things which once 
affected him deeply. Is he now really a 
psychological cripple? 

M-F, 12 Noon EDT, CBS. 



WHEN A GMRL MARRIES After the 
shocking accident in which Kathy Stanley 
is killed, Joan Davis finds that even her 
affectionate friendship is not enough to 
keep Phil Stanley from collapse. Joan, 
meanwhile, is troubled by Harry's insist- 
ence that instead of renting the economical 
apartment she has found, they take an 
elaborate house. Also, what will happen 
to Sammy as Mrs. Fields' influence over 
him increases? 

M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOUNG DR. MALONE Does Dr. Jerry 
Malone really want his wife Anne to 
divorce him? It seems that way, for after 
Anne came to New York to take care of 
him Jerry disappears from the hospital. 
Heartsick, Anne went back to Three Oaks 
with Sam Williams, not knowing that 
Jerry had wandered aimlessly to the 
apartment of Mary Browne. Jerry feels 
a sense of obligation to Mary because of 
her father. 

M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOUNG WIDDER DROWN Certain in 
her own mind that Lita Haddon is the 
real murderer of Horace Steele, Ellen 
Brown grimly continues to try to prove her 
suspicion, but nevertheless her fiance, Dr. 
Anthony Luring, stands trial for the mur- 
der. Ellen is heartbroken when District 
Attorney Ralph Jordan bases his case 
against Anthony on the grounds that Horace 
was romantically interested in Ellen, thus 
giving Anthony a jealous motive. 
M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



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Address. 



Autiys 



round-up! 



(Continued from page 46) 





1st Prizes Gene Autry 

Monark Bicycle 

2nd and 3rd Prizes: 

The Gene Autry 

Six-Shooter Watch 

4th and 5th Prizes: 

Gene Autry Gun and 

Holster Set 

Next Eiyhteen Prizes: 

Gene Autry Electric 

Pencil 



clean in thought, word and deed. 

A cowboy respects womanhood, his par- 
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A cowboy is a patriot. 

Get in the Contest! 

Any boy or girl up to the age of twelve 
can enter this contest and all entries will 
be judged according to age. On a sheet of 
paper about eight by eleven inches, draw 
a picture of Gene demonstrating one of 
his Code of the West rules. You can in- 
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you've chosen. You can color the drawing 
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horn attached to the handle-bar, and chain- 








guard with Gene's own autograph. Your 
choice of 22" or 24" size of this magnificent 
bicycle from the Lewis Supply Company. 

Second and Third Prizes: The Gene Autry 
Six-Shooter Watch with jeweled Swiss 
movement. This is a fully guaranteed time- 
piece and not a toy. It has a luminous dial 
that glows at night, a genuine leather 
cowboy strap, an unbreakable crystal, ani- 
mated gun action and a picture of Gene 
on the face of the watch. From the Almike 
Corporation, licensed exclusively to make 
Gene Autry watches. 

Fourth and Fifth Prizes : The official Gene 
Autry Gun and Holster set. A lavishly dec- 
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All "tooled" and studded with a real cow- 
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And in each holster a real, repeating cap 
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Next Eighteen Prizes : 
Electric Pencil. Press a 



The Gene Autry 
button and four- 






color photographs of Gene and Champion 
light up. It's a fine automatic pencil in 
a handsome gift box from Klik Promotions. 

Rules of the Contest 

1. Draw or paint a picture of Gene Autry 
(and his horse, Champion, if you wish) 
acting out one of his Code of the West 
rules. If you choose "A cowboy is a 
patriot," for instance, draw Gene doing 
something which shows how a cowboy can 
be patriotic. The drawing can be on paper, 
cardboard or canvas, not bigger than eight 
by eleven inches. 

2. Fill in all the information required on 
entry blank. Clip the coupon and secure 
firmly to drawing. Entry blank may be 
completed by parent, and parent or guard- 
ian must sign the coupon. 

3. Sole judges of this contest will be Gene 
Autry and the editors of Radio Television 
Mirror. Drawings will be judged on orig- 
inality and imagination in capturing the 
spirit of Gene Autry and his Code of the 
West, according to the contestant's age. 

4. Entries must be postmarked no later 
than June 30. 1951. All entries become the 
property of Radio Television Mirror and 
will not be returned, nor can the magazine 
undertake to enter into correspondence 
concerning entries. 

5. Entries should be addressed to Gene 
Autry Contest, Box 1477, Grand Central 
Post Office, New York 19, N. Y. 



GENE AUTRY'S 
PRIZE ROUND-UP 
. ENTRY BLANK 

Name 



Age 



Girl 



Boy 



Street or P.O. No. 



City 



State 



If I win, I want the (22" or 24") 
bicycle 

Signature of parent or guardian 




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THREE HAPPY PEOPLE 



(Continued from page 31) and between 
meals. He doesn't go for sweets and he 
seldom takes a drink. Let him take one 
drink and boom, he puts on two pounds! 
He has to watch his weight which is a 
pitiful thing for he loves to eat. So, an 
olive in a big jar is none of my doing. None 
of Sid's routines are any of my — " 

"The car," said Sid's voice, a quiet voice 
but with omen in it, "when I taught you 
to drive the car, know what I mean?" 

"Oh, that, well . . ." 

"She wanted to drive the car," Sid ex- 
plains, putting on that patient expression 
with which he regards the vagaries of Miss 
Coca, "she kept on egging me and egging 
me. So one Sunday I said okay, let's go — 
because how much nagging can you take? 
So we get in the car and I tell her, 'Put 
your foot on the gas. Shift gears. Put 
your foot on the gas. Shift gears. Put your 
foot on the gas. Shift . . . you know how 
it is, you tell a person one, three, four, six, 
seven times — the twentieth time you get 
aggravated, red in the face, start to holler. 
That's what I did. Then suddenly I 
started to laugh. I said, 'This is funny.' 
So," Sid shrugged, "Imogene and I did it 
on the show." 

"OometiMes you are your own source 
O of material," Florence put in de- 
fensively, "when Shellie was born — know 
what / mean?" 

"Three and a half years ago my daugh- 
ter is born and now she thinks of it!" 

"You thought of it and not so long ago 
either when, on the show, you lampooned 
a father waiting for his first baby to be 
born." 

"So all right, so I walked around the 
hospital, I didn't know where, what, who 
. . . I was talking to myself out loud. 
Sure. Why not? I was making all kinds 
of bargains with God . . . I won't do this 
anymore, please . . . From now on, who 
will know me? To pass the time 1 was 
also making up things we'd do together, 
my son and I. I was telling him, 'We'll go 
skeet shooting in the Catskills. Your old 
man does a lot of target shooting. We'll 
ride horseback,' I said, 'I'm a man on a 
horse. Swimming, too. Ever see your Pop 
swim? No? But you will. And badminton. 
Your mother is very unathletic. I'm trying 
to teach her badminton. My hobby is col- 
lecting guns. Think you'll like that? 1 
thought you would.' and then the nurse 
comes in and tells me, 'Mr. Caesar, you 
have a beautiful little girl.' " 

"Which reminds me of another griev- 
ance I cherish and that is when people 
say to me, 'Being married to Sid Caesar, 
you must laugh all day long!' Oh, no. 
Apart from the fact that Sid rehearses all 
day long, six days a week, and rests the 
seventh day, Sid isn't funny offstage. He's 
serious. He's intense. He's a pessimist. 
A worrier. And every once in awhile he 
shuts up like a clam. He walks in and 
you know that's it. Not a word out of him 
for hours, sometimes for days." 

In appearance Sid Caesar is most cer- 
tainly not the way people who watch him 
on television think he is. He looks a good 
ten to fifteen years younger in person 
than on the television screen. And so 
much handsomer that your first reaction 



to the tall, dark and glamour is, this must 
be Sid Caesar's younger brother! 

"Television does one of two things to 
most people," Sid explains his youthful 
(and dreamboat) appearance. "It either 
adds ten to fifteen years, or it takes them 
away. On me, it adds. I am twenty-eight — 
look thirty-eight on the show and know it. 
Makeup might subtract a few years from 
me, but I don't use any makeup. I can't. 
I'd sweat it right off. I perspire when I 
work like in a Turkish bath." 

"He cares so intensely about every- 
thing," Florence says, "I met Sid — let's 
see, we've been married seven and a half 
years, so it would be eight and a half 
years ago — at my uncle's small hotel, Avon 
Lodge, near Woodridge in the Catskills. I 
was working as a childrens' counselor at 
the resort and Sid came up with the band. 
From that first day, we went steady. All 
I remember thinking was, Well, this will 
be a very pleasant summer romance . . . 

"But things are never merely a tepid 
'very pleasant,' with Sid. He's too intense 
for that. Too extreme an extremist. In 
love, as in everything else. So the first 
thing you know, the very pleasant sum- 
mer romance turns into the last act of 
Romeo and Juliet. 

"The war had something to do, of 
course, with the dark overtones shadowing 
our romance. For during that summer of 
falling in love and knowing it, of being 
together every waking moment, Sid knew 
that in the fall he would be in the 
Service. He was inducted into the Coast 
Guard in November. And well do I re- 
member our 'last Goodbye.' The first one. 
We'd been somewhere for dinner that last 
evening and when we got back we stood 
at my door and Sid was saying, 'Goodbye, 
goodbye, goodbye, so long . . . may never 
see you again, goodbye, goodbye . . .' It 
was his big chance to play dramatic but 
the drama in it was that he wasn't playing. 

"The next morning, I hear his voice on 
the telephone: 

"'TVThat happened,' he says, 7 just 
W happened to wander to one side 
of a pillar that divides the induction cen- 
ter in half. Then I hear the induction 
officer saying: All the men on this side 
of the pillar go to Parris Island. The rest 
of you go to Manhattan Beach. I'm going 
to Manhattan Beach!' 

"Not long after this came word that Sid 
was to be shipped out. There was another 
'last Farewell.' This time it was on the 
telephone: 'All the men from A to L are 
being shipped out,' he's telling me, as il 
reading from 'Hamlet,' 'so goodbye, good- 
bye, this is the End.' 

"So what happens? Again his voice on 
the telephone, saying, 'Just wrote you a 
letter, packed my stuff and I'm shipped to 
— the Brooklyn Barracks.' 

"This went on, with variations, until on 
July 17, 1943, exactly one year to the 
day after we met, Sid and I got married. 
Because Sid had only a forty-eight houi 
leave, we were married very quietly, just 
family, a few old friends and the service 
held in a little chapel in New York. 

"How Sid ever became a comedian," says 
Mrs. Sid, "is something I will never 
know He never had the most remote idea, 



as you may know, of being a funnyman. 
Nor did he give evidence of any talent 
for comedy. Far from being the exhibi- 
tionistic, life-of-the-party type, when he 
went to parties he always sat on the 
side-lines, watching everyone. He still does. 

Far from being a funnyman, Sid's dream 
was to be a long-hair musician which he 
gave up (for the saxophone, the clarinet, 
and the writing of popular songs) when 
he realized that Juilliard, where he was 
studying, and the Paris Conservatory, 
where he'd hoped to continue his studies, 
were too rich for his bank account. "I 
wasn't in rags on the street," he'll tell 
you, "wasn't starving exactly, but I re- 
member putting cardboard in my shoes 
and eating a lot of boiled potatoes and 
sour cream." 

He's very observant, and that is how 
lie gets his material. He watches — al- 
though not consciously, he insists — people 
on the street. Situations, rather than in- 
dividuals, are his source. Last winter, for 
instance, the Caesars came up from a va- 
cation in Florida on a DC-4, a non-stop 
flight, which turned out to be so cramped, 
uncomfortable and rugged that Sid sur- 
vived it — even enjoyed it — only because 
it gave him the idea for the routine he 
and Imogene did with Joan Bennett when 
she was their guest on the show. The three 
of them were jammed together like sar- 
dines on the front seat of the plane, you 
may remember, and Sid on their laps, in 
their hair . . . 



O' 



kNE evening a friend of ours 
dropped by Florence remem- 
bers. "He had had a fight with his wife. 
He started telling Sid, 'It's the finish, this 
is the end, the finish and no more.' 'Now, 
take it easy,' Sid counselled, 'relax, have 
some dinner, sit down.' 'No, I can't eat.' So 
he eats. As he eats, he's raving on, 'She's 
a nice girl, a nice woman, she's a fine girl 
— but she's miserable.' The next thing you 
know, the telephone rings, it's his wife and 
he's on his way home . . . and maybe you 
saw Sid as the husband who has left home 
on Your Show of Shows. Our friend and 
his wife saw it — they were in the studio 
audience that night as Sid's guests — and 
they died." 

His success hasn't changed Sid. He's 
still shy. Still nervous. Modest to a fault. 
"A lot of the credit for Your Show of 
Shows goes," he tells everyone, "to my 
producer, Max Liebman, and the writers." 
Even his ambitions are modest. "I don't 
have any aspirations to be a millionaire," 
he tells you, "just enough to pay the 
butcher and the grocer." Yet he likes nice 
things, likes clothes, is neat as a new pin. 
Likes good cigars. Good food. Good cars. 

Last Christmas, Sid gave Florence a 
mink coat. "We don't take her out any- 
more," he kids, "we take the coat out!" 

He loves their new home, the eight-room- 
and-three baths co-op apartment on Park 
Avenue in the 80's which Sid bought. 

"This is our first home after sub-letting 
all over the place for years," Florence says, 
"and Sid loves the idea of owning it." 

That their home is on Park Avenue is 
another joy for Sid. "As a kid, my father 
used to drive me down Park Avenue, clear 
from Yonkers where we lived," he says, 
"and it seemed to me like being in an- 
other world. I never dreamed . . . But here 
I am and isn't it," Sid asks, his eyes se- 
rious, "a small world?" 




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HAPPILY EVER AFTER 



{Continued from page 33) "I was a pretty 
cocky kid," Sandy grins. 

He was cocky especially because he'd 
done it all himself, done it, in fact, against 
the wishes of his father. Sandy's father, 
a police lieutenant on the New York City 
force, wanted his son to become a doctor. 

But fate had other ideas, and instead 
of becoming a doctor, Sandy has ended up 
by portraying one. Actually to those who 
understood where his real interests lay in 
his days at Newtown High School in 
Queens, the switch from medicine to the 
theatre could come as little surprise. Al- 
ways drawn to acting, Sandy was a prom- 
inent member of the school's dramatic so- 
ciety. Puppetry, too, intrigued him, and he 
created his own troupe of puppets, giving 
performances at local churches and lodges. 
He liked art, especially cartooning. 

Still, when he enrolled at New 
York University, Sandy had every 
intention of studying medicine till he got 
a job as a radio newscaster on a small sta- 
tion in Long Island, WWRL. At the grand 
salary of ten dollars a week, he started to 
work and the die was cast. This was what 
he wanted to do. When a better job on a 
station in the upstate New York town of 
Olean came through, Sandy grabbed it. 

Here, in Olean, Sandy spent six of the 
most important months of his young life. 
Throwing himself headlong into his first 
full-time job in radio, he began to get a 
clear picture of where he wanted to go in 
it. First, establish himself in announcing, 
and then — branch out into acting. 

Back in New York, he went to work 
for WNYC, the municipal station. Among 
his other assignments, Sandy was the an- 
nouncer for New York's magnetic dynamo 
of a mayor, the late Fiorello H. LaGuardia, 
who. used to call him "the kid." 

Then in the fall of 1941, young Sandy 
Becker had a plum fall into his lap — an 
announcing job at WBT in Charlotte, North 
Carolina. Settling back in the train that 
was speeding him to his new assignment, 
Sandy was filled with high ambitions and 
some rather funny misconceptions. The 
first one was shattered as soon as the train 
pulled in at Charlotte. 

Sandy, whose idea of the South was de- 
rived strictly from "Gone With The Wind," 
had been looking forward to entering an 
exotic region of sprawling bales of cotton 
and crumbling mansions. 

"One of the great disappointments of my 
life," he says, "was getting off to see 
nothing but a dreary railway station and 
a town no different than any other." 

As for the other misconception, it took 
Sandy seven months to get rid of that. 
Like any true nineteen-year-old New York 
sophisticate, he had a properly disdainful 
attitude toward Southern womanhood. 

And then one June day — June 20th, 
1942 to be exact — Sandy met Ruth Joyce 
Venable, one of the most popular girls in 
Charlotte. At the advanced age of twenty, 
after dating for several years, Ruth had 
decided that since she hadn't yet fallen in 
love she evidently was never going to. 
That being the case, Ruth thought she 
might as well take up singing as a career. 
She had a good voice and had already sung 
at some dances. 



Four weeks later, Ruth said a not-too- 
sad farewell to her singing ambitions, and 
became Mrs. George Sanford Becker at an 
elopement ceremony in Marion, South 
Carolina. The courtship had been a light- 
ning affair. With their first date, Ruth had 
decided that this young man was entirely 
different from any she had known before. 

When a little more than a week after 
they had met Sandy said, "What would 
you say if I asked you to marry me?" Ruth 
found nothing unreasonable in the idea. 

Still, after the elopement, even though 
they were wildly happy, Ruth understood 
what a selfish thing they had done. She 
just couldn't tell her mother. 

"We had always been very close, Mother 
and I," Ruth says. "There was nothing that 
I had ever kept from her before. And actu- 
ally there was no real reason for this 
secret marriage." 

After the formal church ceremony a 
month later, Sandy and Ruth settled down 
briefly in a small cottage on the outskirts 
of town. Less than a year passed, however, 
before Sandy was called to service. 

After his discharge, Sandy and Ruth 
came up to New York. Establishing some 
kind of a record, Sandy landed a job an- 
nouncing a week later. From then on he 
became more and more in demand, but his 
heart was still set on acting. Finally in 
1948, Gary Merrill, who had been playing 
Young Dr. Malone, was giving up the 
part to go to Hollywood. As Sandy puts it, 
there were "mammoth auditions." Not very 
encouraging for an untried youngster. But 
when the shouting was over, Sandy Becker 
had become Young Dr. Malone, and he did 
so well listeners never noticed the switch. 

Sandy insists that he doesn't deserve all 
the credit. 



I 



would never have been able to do 
it," he says, "without the wonderful 
cooperation of the cast, and without the 
help of Walter Gorman, our director — the 
best director in radio, in my opinion." 

Exactly when did Sandy take over the 
part of Young Dr. Malone? Ask him that 
and he slowly pulls out his wallet, tenderly 
withdraws a check voucher. It's from his 
first salary check for playing the role, and 
it's dated November 30, 1948. 

Now, of course, he's "Dr. Malone" not 
only on the daytime serial but to his 
neighbors and friends. Ruth comes in for 
her share of the kidding, too. When they 
first moved out to the Fresh Meadows hous- 
ing development in New York's Borough 
of Queens two years ago, their neighbors 
couldn't figure out what this young man's 
profession could be. All the other husbands 
in the community left for work at a re- 
spectable 8 A.M. But this Becker character 
could be seen flying out the front door at 
eleven o'clock in the morning. 

One woman particularly was consumed 
with curiosity. 

"For weeks," Ruth says, "she watched 
this phenomenon take place every morning, 
until she couldn't stand it any longer. She 
just had to come over and ask me. Natural- 
ly word spread around and we became the 
Malones instead of the Beckers." 

When Ruth was in the hospital awaiting 
Annelle, a new patient came in, who hap- 
pened to be a daytime serial fan. At this 



time, Jerry Malone had disappeared and 
the new patient kept complaining about 
not having a radio so that she could find 
out what was happening to him. 

"I must know whether he's coming 
back," she kept repeating. "How can I 
find out if he's coming back?" 

Without thinking, Ruth spoke up. 

"He'll be back next Thursday," she said. 

"How do you know?" demanded the 
other, and, of course, the secret was out 
and Ruth was "Mrs. Malone." 

Now that Annelle has joined the family, 
the Beckers' two-bedroom attached duplex 
house is entirely too small for comfort 
and Sandy and Ruth are looking for a 
larger place. Spurring them on is the fact 
that their home is in desperate need of 
redecorating, largely due to the imaginative 
activity of two-year-old Curtis, otherwise 
known as Butch. His greatest joy in life 
thus far appears to be marking up walls. 

Six-year-old Joyce has always liked 
to draw, but for a long time she 
seemed uninterested in the mural as a 
form of creative expression. Then one fine 
day Ruth discovered that Joyce had caught 
the bug, too. On the wall over her bed, in 
in the room she shares with Curtis, Joyce 
had drawn a group of gay figures. 

The children have apparently inherited 
this artistic bent from their father, who 
spends a good part of his spare time draw- 
ing and sculpturing. 

When the Beckers move and Ruth can 
redecorate, she expects to buy no pictures. 
She plans to have Sandy paint them. 

Until the children are older, there will 
be no fragile or expensive furniture in the 
house. That's because Ruth firmly believes 
that the home should belong to the chil- 
dren as much as to their parents. 

Another thing that both Ruth and Sandy 
believe in is discipline. The children are 
taught that there are rules which must be 
obeyed. If the occasion demands it, they 
are spanked. 

"We give them all the love that we can," 
Ruth says, "but we also demand respect." 

There is another important member of 
the Becker family. A pure-bred German 
Shepherd, his name is Jocko, and he is 
crazy about everyone in the family from 
Sandy to little Annelle, whom he will lick 
gently as she lies in her carriage. 

Sandy and Ruth have come a long way 
since that impulsive beginning almost nine 
years ago. They have matured into re- 
sponsible adults, learning, in the process, 
to counter-balance two very different tem- 
peraments. Ruth is the calm, tolerant one; 
Sandy is the more temperamental, likely 
to be disappointed in people because he 
expects too much of them, subject to great 
enthusiasms. 

"You never know what he's going to do 
next," Ruth says, contentedly. "It keeps 
life interesting." 

One sure sign of the strength of their 
marriage is that neither enjoys doing things 
without the other, whether it's shopping at 
the supermarket on Saturday for the week's 
supplies, or playing poker or canasta with 
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COME AND VISIT TONY MARTIN 




(Continued from page 37) occasions is 
tremendous; at five months of age he 
weighed nineteen pounds, eight ounces, 
and had two firm, white teeth which he 
revealed in an infectious grin whenever 
he is accorded attention. Now he is taking 
his first steps and trying to manufacture 
baritone solos. 

When Cyd and Tony purchased the 
house, they were a little worried about 
the usualness of its architecture. "The only 
way we're going to be contented here," 
said Tony, "is to give the place some per- 
sonality. Right now it needs — -well, some- 
thing." 

"To be lived in," supplemented Cyd, 
"and to be marked by our personal tastes 
and activities." 

First step was to correct the dull char- 
acter of the entrance hall, which started 
life as a stereotyped corridor leading from 
front door to patioi 

The Martins agreed that an antiqued 
mirror, installed in foot-squares 
from floor to ceiling, would give an impres- 
sion of space and graciousness. Next, an 
irregular planting area, marked by an 
eighteen-inch flagstone retaining wall, was 
installed in front of the mirrored wall. 
Presto, the visitor was greeted by the illu- 
sion of size, airiness, and greenery. 

The living room was furnished with 
lounges. Two huge divans were installed 
along the east wall. In front of the fire- 
place the Martins placed a lazy-susan 
coffee table, five feet in diameter. Around 
this they installed two semi-circular, back- 
less sofas. 

The Martins, analyzing their social life, 
discovered that their summer parties cen- 
tered around the swimming pool and the 
patio barbecue, but that their winter parties 
centered around the fireplace. The two 
sofas were the answer to the fireplace con- 
gestion. For really big parties, these sofas 
can be moved into position beside one of 
the divans to create a large — but cosy — 
conversational group. 

Tony's determination to fill the house 
with really meaningful mementos is given 
expression in the living room. Above the 
fireplace is a Vlaminck landscape, a prize 
purchased when Cyd and Tony were in 
Paris. It is a fascinating study of a thun- 
derous sky brooding over a rain-soaked 
country road, and — by contrast — it makes 
the fireplace seem a secure and cosy spot. 

The card room, sunny and warm during 
the day, is the spot to which guests gravi- 
tate when Cyd and Tony are having only a 
few people in for supper. 

The west wall of the card room is a 
souvenir-lover's dream. Assembled on it 
are such mementos as a giant-size key to 
the city of Boston; a certificate "key" to 
the city of New Orleans; the cricket bat 
which was presented to Tony during his 
Palladium appearance in London. 

The Martins' dining room is a gay room, 
flooded with morning sunlight from its 
wide eastern windows. They never enter- 
tain more than eight people at a sit-down 
dinner, and they keep the menu simple. 
When they give a really large party, the 
Martins entertain at a hotel. 

The Martins' medium-sized parties are 
given in their own home and served buffet 



style, a system on which Tony insists that 
he is an authority. "The important thing 
about a buffet dinner is color. We like to 
serve sliced breast of turkey, covered by 
a golden Welsh rarebit. On the table we 
like to have a huge pot of baked beans 
topped by bacon, a bright red tomato 
aspic salad and a large plate of sliced avo- 
cados. Everybody says, 'That looks good,' 
and your party is a success." 

Adjoining the dining room is Tony's 
music room. Its walls are chocolate brown, 
and applied in geometric designs on this 
background are a series of pages torn 
from an antique book of sheet music. 
Around the room, just below the ceiling, is 
a white border made by the lines of the 
scale. On this scale appear the white notes 
of Tony's theme song. 

The entire house is eloquent of the fact 
that it is occupied by two people who are 
very much in love and who share one 
another's lives completely. Oddly enough, 
when Tony and Cyd first met, there was 
nothing in the meeting to prophesy that 
they would one day occupy a dream house 
together. 

Their original date was arranged by 
Nat Goldstone, who was agent for both. 
Talent agents are notable cupids in Holly- 
wood, but in this case Mr. Goldstone's ef- 
forts seemed to be wasted. Cyd looked at 
Tony and decided that, in all probability, 
he was a self-satisfied young man. Tony 
looked at Cyd and concluded that she had 
been spoiled by those who were impressed 
by her beauty and talent. The evening was 
marked by more than a slight chill. 

A year went by, and Mr. Goldstone tried 
again. He found himself stuck with two 
extra tickets to "Black Narcissus," called 
Tony and suggested that he take Cyd, 
joining the Goldstones for dinner in ad- 
vance. Tony didn't exactly say no; he 
suggested that Cyd might be more in- 
terested in some other client on the Gold- 
stone list. Mr. Goldstone said that time 
was running out and he didn't want to 
entrust Cyd with anyone except Mr. Mar- 
tin. 



S°c 



the 



Miss 



Tony called for the same 
Charisse he had squired one year 
earlier, and concluded that there must have 
been something wrong with his eyesight on 
that occasion. She was pretty. Moreover, 
she had a sense of humor. Furthermore, 
she was casual, natural and without 
affectation. 

As for Cyd, she decided that Tony had 
improved and mellowed a great deal in 
twelve months. Shortly after, Cyd injured 
her knee in a dancing routine and was 
hospitalized. Tony sent her flowers regu- 
larly and telephoned several times a week. 
When, just after the stroke of midnight 
on New Year's Eve, he called to wish Cyd 
(still in the hospital) a Happy 1948, he 
suspected that it was going to be a great 
year for both of them. 

They were married on May 15, 1948, 
and embarked on a permanent honeymoon. 
Tony, Jr., was born August 28, 1950. 

The key to Tony's success has been har- 
mony; the key to Cyd's success has been 
rhythm. The key to the Martin household 
is a combination of rhythm and harmony. 
What could make a guest more welcome! 



LUCKY MARION MARLOWE 



(Continued from page 35) appearing in 
the London musical; above her perform- 
ance before the King and Queen of Eng- 
land; above meeting such greats as Winston 
Churchill and Anthony Eden; and above 
the attentive escorts of nobility who flocked 
around her. 

From the meeting with Arthur has come 
her present success on his television pro- 
gram, many movie offers, and a future more 
luminous than most twenty-one-year-olds 
dare to dream about. 

The best thing about it, Marion feels, is 
that it all seemed to come about so casually. 
She was back in this country last winter, 
a bride of about five months, living with 
her husband temporarily in Miami. 

Anyhow, at this particular point she 
was having dinner one night at the Kenil- 
worth Hotel in Miami, and in the course 
of the evening she met the hotel's owner, 
Mr. Raffington. He asked if she would like 
to sing there the following Sunday evening, 
and she said she would be delighted. 

It happened that Godfrey had expected 
to be in Miami the previous week but 
was delayed until the night of Marion's 
appearance on the show. Fate scheduled 
her number with his belated arrival. 

It was an unusually responsive audience 
and Marion left the stage elated. She was 
called into the office, and expected only to 
be handed her check for the evening's work. 
"Someone wants to meet you," Mr. Raffing- 
ton said. It was Godfrey, who took her hand 
and told her, "Little lady, I think you're 
wonderful. Can you leave for New York 
with me in the morning?" 

That first day on the Godfrey show is 
almost a blank in her memory. From early 
afternoon she went through the motions of 
rehearsing and then doing the show, hardly 
aware of reality. 

Just what sparks a career like Marion's 
and justifies this faith? Let's go back to 
the real beginning of her story and try to 
find out: 

She was born in St. Louis on March 7, 
1930, the only child of the Townsends. 
Marion became famous in the Townsend 
neighborhood for being the only baby who 
had bounced right out of her diapers in 
perfect rhythm with the music. At the age 
of four that feeling for rhythm had led 
to singing on the radio with juvenile talent 
shows, and at five she presided over a daily 
fifteen-minute program of her own. Two 
years later she was doing "dramatics" on 
the air. 

When Marion got to Beaumont High 
School she was so taken up with her own 
special interests that she had no time for 
the usual teen-age sports. This is the sort 
of high school heresy that sets a girl apart 
and leaves her a little lonely at times. 

In her early teens, Marion got experi- 
ence in dramatic roles with some of the 
little theater groups, like St. Louis' Roof- 
top Theater. There was some professional 
modeling to help pay for lessons. Then, 
at seventeen, one of her biggest breaks 

Same, although it didn't turn out at all as 
lie expected. 
She had made a recording of a song for 
a friend, and a motion picture executive 
heard it and encouraged her to go to 
Hollywood. 

After many months she was right where 

m 



she'd started, career-wise. Fate was still 
on the job, however. One evening she 
decided that only a movie would lift her 
spirits. Although fifty cents seemed a siz- 
able sum, she paid thirty-nine cents ad- 
mission to the theater around the corner 
and ten cents went into the popcorn 
machine in the lobby. Her dime stayed in, 
but no popcorn came out, and she was 
banging on the machine and shaking it j 
when a voice asked, "Can I help?" 

She looked up — way up, beyond her own 
five feet seven and one-half inches, to the 
man who towered a full eleven inches 
above her. The first thing she noticed, of 
course, was his big heavenly height, men 
tall enough for her to look up to being 
reasonably scarce. She had liked his voice, 
and she liked his looks — but most of all 
she liked the fact that he shook the precious 
popcorn loose. He was on his way in to 
see the movie, too, and there happened to 
be only two seats left, and they were to- 
gether. She shared the popcorn with him 
and after the show he asked which way she 
lived and offered to walk along with her if 
she didn't mind. 

On the way home he told her he had 
recently got out of the Navy. They com- 
pared ages and she learned he was eight 
years older than she. Marion's aunt invited 
Hal in for coffee that first night, liked 
him so well that she asked him to dinner 
later in the week. Two and a half years 
later Hal and Marion were married at 
her home in St. Louis. 

The movies didn't seem to want Marion 
during that first Hollywood period, but one 
night when she was singing at Ciro's, a 
London producer offered her a singing- 
dancing lead in a show he was casting. A 
few months later she was in London, re- 
hearsing for the musical, called "Sauce 
Tartar." It had a highly successful run and 
she stayed with it for eighteen months, dou- 
bling on Sundays on television for the BBC. 

"T loved England, partly perhaps be- 
J_ cause I am English on my father's 
side. Even the first time I set foot on Lon- 
don's cobblestones I had the strangest feel- 
ing I had been there before. But I was 
terribly happy to get back. Two days after 
I got home, Hal and I were married." 

Frank Parker, who sings with her on the 
Godfrey show, can't say enough about her 
natural showmanship, her voice and her 
wonderful enthusiasm. Archie Bleyer, the 
orchestra leader, will tell you that every 
note she sings is expressive, every word 
full of meaning. This is rare praise from 
the artists who work with her every week. 

But perhaps the finest tribute of all oc- 
curred the night of her twenty-first birth- 
day. Hal, now in government service, was 
down in Florida and couldn't get to New 
York. She was feeling a little sorry for 
herself. Before the show began she told 
one of the crew that it was a big day in her 
life, then forgot she had even mentioned it. 

When she came off the stage and went 
back to her dressing room, someone had 
marked up her mirror with lipstick. 
"Happy Birthday from the stagehands," it 
said. A cake used in the commercial on the 
show had been decorated with a candle. 

Happily, she realized then that she had 
really been taken into the magic circle of 
Arthur Godfrey and His Friends. 




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I 

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93 



A Reason for 



In the fight that 

was going on in Meta's 

private world — in 

the world beneath 

the other surface — only 

Joe Roberts understood. 



• n 



R 

M 

94 



1H9HI 




Living 



BY EVELYN FIORE 

When a woman loses 
all that is most dear., 
when she faces life 
without the one cherished 
person — where does she 
find courage to continue? 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These are the harrowing 
events which led up to the death of Meta 
White's son, Chuckie, and the ordeal which 
Meta went through before she was cleared, on 
the grounds of temporary insanity, of the mur- 
der of her husband, Ted. Throughout it all, 
Meta was able to maintain the inner strength 
that helped her find a reason for living. 

WHEN Meta White went on trial for 
her life, charged with the murder 
of her husband, every paper in the coun- 
try was ready to offer a fortune for her 
bylined story. Classically, dramatically 
beautiful, retaining still the aura of her 
successful modeling career and her bril- 
liant marriage, and shadowed now by 
tragedy which had culminated in shat- 
tering horror . . . the public went wild 
with curiosity about her. Editors bit 
their nails and sent frantic long-distance 
calls to their Los Angeles correspond- 
ents. Wily reporters wheedled or bribed 
or blustered, until Meta's lawyer and 
friend, Ray Brandon, threatened to take 
special steps to protect her. The sensa- 
tion-seekers did their best, but their best 
was not nearly good enough. Gradually 
it became clear that Meta White wasn't 
going to talk. 

What the public never learned was 
that Meta couldn't talk. For a long time 
she couldn't even try, not even for the 
shaken little group of family and friends 
who banded {Continued on page 96) 

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(Continued from page 95) together to 
help her. Not for Papa or her sister 
Trudy or her brother Bill; not for Char- 
lotte Brandon, Ray's wife, who was as 
nearly Meta's most intimate friend as any- 
one in the world. Almost not even for 
Ray himself, though her very life de- 
pended on what she could tell him. Only 
one man in the early days of her trial 
understood that it was not obstinacy but 
self-protection. Better than any psychia- 
trist, Joe Roberts perceived that Meta 
couldn't afford to remember. She was afraid 
she might lose her desperate fight for 
sanity, for balance . . . 

Joe Roberts, reporter, saw this almost 
too clearly. It was the kind of understand- 
ing that could do him no good in his 
primary goal — to get her story. But grad- 
ually he gave in, acknowledging to him- 
self that Meta Bauer White was no longer 
a story, but a woman ... a woman. Meta 
could talk a little to Joe. He, too, had 
children, and he had been through some 
kind of purgatory himself. She tried; and 
she talked. Somehow, because it was Joe, 
she even knew just where to start. 

The night it had happened, Meta and 
Ted had been sitting in the library of 
their home, reading. The Whites at home, 
she was thinking; like a picture in House 
Beautiful. The caption would never, never 
say that the Whites were not really at home 
with one another. They were at odds 
about everything under the sun. That the 
only thing that kept them in the same 
room — the same life — was Chuckie. 

As if his name in her mind had been a 
signal, they heard it — the shout followed 
instantly by the sickening thud that re- 
sounded through the house. "Chuckie!" 
Meta screamed, and was running up the 
stairs before the echo had faded, dimly 
conscious of the pounding of Ted's feet 
right behind her. Through Chuckie's bed- 
room and into the bathroom — and there, 
horribly still, at the bottom of the dry 
tub, Chuckie lay. Silent; motionless. 

Meta thought she screamed again, but 
it was on an indrawn breath that she said, 
"Oh — God!" Ted's hand was already on 
Chuckie's forehead, on his wrist. With 
the other he held her off. 

"He's all right; just stunned. Look out, 
I'm going to lift him." 

"Just stunned! Give him to me!" But 
Ted pushed her easily aside and carried 
Chuckie to his bed. Meta's own breath 



stopped as she bent over the slight little 
figure; but in a matter of seconds the 
eyelids fluttered and opened. Chuckie — 
blessedly — was all right again. 

^Where's Dad?" 

"Here, son," Ted said from the other 
side of the bed. He put a hand on Chuckie's 
shoulder, and even at that moment Meta 
couldn't help thinking, "Another man 
would bend down and kiss him. Not Ted 
— Ted has to be man-to-man. As though 
Chuckie were twenty-six instead of six." 
Her own lips trembled as she pressed them 
against Chuckie's cheek. He stirred, too 
polite to push her away. "I'm all right," 
he said. "What happened?— Oh, I fell?" 
He sat up and looked anxiously at Ted. 
"Dad— I didn't cry." 

"Of course not. You only conked your- 
self a bit. Nothing to get — " he glanced at 
Meta with cool irony — "hysterical about." 

"You think not?" Meta accepted the 
look as a challenge and hit back sharply. 
"It was quite a thud. I believe even you 
ran instead of walking. And Chuckie was 
unconscious for a few seconds — even you 
saw that. Call it hysterical if you like, 
but I'm going to call Dr. Boling." 

"Meta, really." Ted's mouth curved in 
distaste. "Must you go running to that 
man at the slightest excuse? I tell you 
Chuckie's perfectly all right — " 

Meta started to say, "Let's not do this 
in front of Chuckie, please," but bit it 
back in time, remembering that after all 
she had snapped first at Ted. Without fur- 
ther words she went out to the hall ex- 
tension and called Ross Boling. 

Ross seemed to agree with Ted. He 
asked quick questions — if Chuckie seemed 
all right, alert, not in pain. "There's al- 
ways an off chance of concussion, but it 
doesn't sound like it. I'll come if you in- 
sist, but I'm certain it's not called for." 

Reluctantly Meta hung up. From 
Chuckie's bedroom came his thin, precise 
voice, childish but still so much like 
Ted's ... he did sound perfectly normal, 
talking away about the paint set she had 
bought him that day. She smothered a faint 
regret that Ross hadn't thought it ad- 
visable to come out, in a sense putting 
himself on Ted's side against her, though 
he couldn't know that . . . 

When she went back into the bedroom 
Chuckie showed her how neatly he had 
done up his pajamas. "All by myself, 
Mother, see — I told you last night I 




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could do the pajamas all by myself." 

"And your mother wouldn't allow you 
to?" Ted clucked his tongue in mock 
deprecation. "Now that she's seen how well 
you do she'll naturally not interfere again. 
Isn't that so, my dear?" From almost iden- 
tical eyes, Ted and his son looked at her, 
and Meta felt a chill contract her shoul- 
ders. Innocent triumph shone from Chuck- 
le's blue eyes, but Ted's were not innocent. 
After kissing Chuckie and tucking him 
in, they went out, Ted pausing to click 
off the light just outside his door. Meta 
bit her lip. It was an old battle, this of 
the night light. She didn't feel like fight- 
ing it again tonight, with Chuckie already 
upset. If he asked for it . . . she listened, 
but from the darkened bedroom came no 
sound. With his father there, Chuckie was 
more afraid to reveal his fear of the dark 
than to suffer, as Meta knew he did, from 
the fear itself. 

She had tried so often to tell Ted that 
nowadays people didn't make chil- 
dren go through hell if they were scared of 
the dark. You gave them a dim light; then, 
when they were a little older and able to 
be reasoned with, you explained, you con- 
vinced them there was nothing to be afraid 
of. And because they had learned by that 
time to trust and believe in you, they be- 
lieved you about the dark. It worked. In 
book after book on child psychology Meta 
had circled those paragraphs, but Ted 
always put them aside with the curt ver- 
dict. "Coddling." 

Meta went to bed, to lie awake and won- 
der as the night lengthened how long it 
had taken Chuckie to fall asleep. It wasn't 
only the dark he feared. There were so 
many things . . . sometimes she wondered 
how it could be that Ted, considered such 
an intelligent man, couldn't see how lu- 
dicrous he was with his deliberate in- 
sistence that Chuckie not be afraid of 
anything. It's unmanly to show fear, he 
would say; and Chuckie, more afraid of 
his father's criticism than of anything, 
would stiffen and thin his little mouth and 
try to look as much like Ted as 'possible. 

Meta sat up suddenly in the darkness. 
Was that a noise from Chuckie's room? 
Fumbling for robe and slippers, she went 
silently down the corridor to his door. He 
was flinging about in bed, tossing the 
blankets frantically, his forehead damp 
when she touched it. Words formed from 
his murmurings . . . "But paints are nice. 
Dad, I want . . ." and then, "I'm lost. I'm 
lost, you'll have to come—" He gave a 
final toss that would have landed him on 
he floor if she hadn't held him. 

"Mother!" he cried, as though she 

ightened him more than his nightmare. 

"I'm sorry, darling, I didn't mean to 
wake you. You were having a bad dream, 
I think." 

"I'm all right. It was ... I think it 
was ... I don't want that paintbox, 



iras . . 
Mother." 

It took Meta a moment to understand. 
"The paints we bought today? Well — all 
right, dear, we'll put them aside till you 
do want them." He's still half asleep, she 
thought. Best let him get right back with- 
out really waking him. 

But Chuckie said earnestly, "I don't 
want them at all. Dad says it's sissy." 

Meta stiffened. For months she had 
watched Chuckie laboring with his baby- 
ish nursery crayons, trying to get the ef- 



fects he wanted. He had asked for paints 
every time they went into town. And now, 
Ted said they were sissy, so Chuckie 
couldn't afford to want them any longer. 
But aloud she only said quietly, "We'll 
talk about it when we're both wide-awake, 
darling. Would you like anything now — 
some milk or water?" Chuckie shook his 
head. "All right then, darling, I'm going 
now." Obediently he slid back and let 
Meta smooth the covers, and submitted to 
a kiss. At the door she hesitated. "Would 
you like me to leave the light on now?" 

Chuckie jerked upright. "Oh, no! I'm 
big enough to do without it!" There was 
an actual touch of panic as he thought 
she might tempt him to go against his 
Dad's orders. Meta had an insane desire 
to scream at him as though he were an 
adult, "Chuckie, relax! Never mind Dad! 
If you want the light you may have it, 
darling, don't fight yourself so hard be- 
cause of what Dad says!" But all she 
said was "Good night, then." 

She slept very little. But she used the 
long night to make up her mind to some- 
thing she'd been evading; one of the few 
things she'd been afraid to do because 
of Ted's violent objection to it. There 
were few things he held in greater con- 
tempt than psychiatrists, and his anger 
when she first mentioned taking Chuckie 
to one was really frightening. The sugges- 
tion that any outsider could presume to 
advise him about his own son made him 
so furious that — because he rarely per- 
mitted himself to lose his temper — he be- 
came really threatening. Meta had hesi- 
tated, going only so far as to get from 
Ross the name of a child psychiatrist he 
respected. But she couldn't let any more 
time go by. Chuckie worried her; he wasn't 
doing well at all. Too many nightmares, 
she thought, planning out what to tell the 
doctor. Too evasive about other children, 
too unable to give and take. This dis- 
turbing fear of any kind of physical ac- 
tivity. And now Ted's insistence that he 
take boxing lessons . . . could that do 
him any good? The fear of water, the 
other fears Ted wouldn't recognize, and 
Chuckie wouldn't admit ... It was 
enough, surely, to disturb any mother? 

Dr. hewitt didn't seem to think she 
was. Ross, who made the appoint- 
ment for her the next day, told her how 
lucky she was to get it on such short no- 
tice, but when Meta left Chuckie in the 
outer office and went in for her own brief 
interview, she realized that Ross must have 
given his friend a pretty thorough briefing 
on the White family, pointing up her anx- 
iety and Ted's opposition. 

"I must say at once, Mrs. White, that 
in cases like this — where one parent is in 
opposition or at least is not cooperative — I 
usually withdraw. There's not much I can 
do for a child whose home environment 
isn't geared to operate in harmony with 
whatever I feel I've learned about the 
child. Dr. Boling explained that Mr. White 
isn t — 

Meta's hands clenched on her purse. 
"I'm prepared to do anything," she in- 
terrupted, "even anything drastic, if you 
feel as I do about Chuckie — that he isn't 
getting the right things from us at home. 
Please don't worry about my husband." 

That night Meta prepared for Ted's 
homecoming as painstakingly as though 
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husband. With Mrs. Winters she planned 
a dinner to include the special salad he 
liked, and reminded the housekeeper to 
use the new china they had brought back 
from England. Feeling a little wry and 
foolish, she put on the dramatic new 
housecoat Ted liked. Everything on the 
surface must be smooth, must be pleasing 
and disarming, for it was going to require 
all the courage she had to tell Ted what 
she had learned that afternoon. Dr. 
Hewitt didn't think she was a nervous 
mother; Dr. Hewitt thought there were 
things bothering Chuckie that could lead 
to even worse things, later on . . . 

As always, Ted was well aware that 
she had tried to make it a special 
evening. He was like a woman that way, 
sensitive to the slightest change in atmos- 
phere, observant of all detail. He never 
said, "You're looking well tonight," but 
rather, "The line of that thing is perfect 
for you," or "You must get something else 
in that shade of violet; it's charming." He 
said just that tonight, and then as she 
thanked him, he went on with scarcely a 
pause and with no change in tone, "Why 
did you disregard my wishes — my orders 
— about not subjecting Chuckie to a psy- 
chological examination?" 

Taken by surprise, Meta struggled to 
keep eyes and voice level as she answered. 
"I did as I thought best. Surely your — 
orders, as you call them — don't have the 
force of legal restriction?" 

He said smoothly, "In case you're won- 
dering how I found out, it was Chuckie 
himself who told me, of course. When I 
dropped into his room before coming 
down to dinner, you know." 

"Ted — please listen. Listen as though I 
were a stranger talking to you about 
Chuckie. Those nightmares — does it seem 
right to you that a child of six should 
have them so often? Doesn't it tell you 
he's worried, disturbed about something 
he can't or daren't talk about while he's 
awake?" 

"Everybody has some fears, at some 
time in his life. The important thing is not 
to give way to your fear. Chuckie knows 
that, I've told him that." 

"I know you've told him. But he's only 
six, Ted. He can't control his reactions 
as well as you seem to expect. He'll do 
anything to live up to your expectations. 
Won't you try to find out what's best for 
him, and do that? At Dr. Hewitt's office to- 
day — no, please let me finish, then you can 
have your say. The doctor had a table full 
of toys for Chuckie. That's how they get to 
the children, apparently — try to get a line 
on them without asking questions. He pre- 
tended he had some papers to sign, and 
told Chuckie to amuse himself for a while. 
There were — there were boxing gloves, 
and a boat with a wind-up motor, and a set 
of oil paints." 

Ted lit a cigarette. "I see. And with 
these props the eminent doctor can arrive 
at a blueprint. of any child's character." 

"Please, please! You know psychology 
isn't a question of blueprints! All he 
wanted was a key, an indication to Chuck- 
ie's real thoughts." 

"And he got it, no doubt." 

"He got it. Ted, the first thing Chuckie 
did when he thought he wasn't observed 
was to push the gloves as far away as he 
could. Then he put the boat out of sight 
under the table. The only thing he played 



with was the painting outfit." 

"Extraordinary," Ted said. "Did it oc- 
cur to you or this so-called scientist of 
yours that the boy was showing very 
good sense? One can't expect him to 
box with himself, now can one? And for- 
give me for being so practical, but what 
good is a boat without water on which to 
run it?" 

Through clenched teeth Meta said, "Let 
me finish. He didn't merely ignore the 
gloves. He pushed them from him, tried 
to hide them. And he wouldn't talk about 
his boxing lessons. When the doctor 
asked if he were looking forward to them 
he just held up a picture he had painted 
and asked the doctor if he could tell what 
it was meant to be." 

There was a pause, while Ted method- 
ically stamped out his cigarette. Meta 
wondered if she should tell him that Dr. 
Hewitt had found Chuckie's paintings in- 
teresting, and had even said that he ought 
to be encouraged to express himself in 
drawing and color. 

Ted was angry enough without that now. 
He stood up and looked at her coldly. 
"If you've quite finished, I've got a book 
I'm anxious to get at. And by the way. 
Meta. you'll oblige me by paying close 
attention to what I'm about to say." Steel 
had crept into his voice, arousing in Meta 
the familiar, futile resentment. She could 
only run away. It was hopeless. He said. 
"Chuckie is my son. I will bring him up 
as I see fit. You are not to annoy and 
upset the boy by any more psychological 
persecutions." 

She hated him so much that she couldn't 
even look at him. She was conscious that 
he left the room and went on up the stairs. 

Startled, Meta lowered the hands with 
which she had covered her quivering lips 
and stared upwards. She heard the door 
of his room close . . . Thank heaven for 
money, she thought fiercely. At least they 
didn't have to preserve the fiction of a 
happy marriage on into the night. They 
could afford a house large enough to 
give them each a separate bedroom, 
could meet at breakfast with formal 
good-mornings like people staying at the 
same hotel. 

A shuddering certainty crept into 
the room and hung over her, a 
cloud created of her own thoughts and 
Ted's. She could almost see him up there, 
hands tented before him, eyes calculating 
. . . weighing his chances of getting 
Chuckie if it should come to separation or 
divorce. Ah, but he never would, never! 
On what grounds? Her lips twisted. If it 
came to that, it might be easier for her to ( 
make out a case against him. What was 
there against her? Nothing. 

For a few days there was armed peace 
in the White household. Ted was at home 
very little, and they were unfailingly 
courteous to one another when they met. 
Nothing more was said about Dr. Hewitt, 
except that Chuckie told Meta one day 
that Dad wouldn't let him talk about his 
visit to the doctor. "I wanted to tell about 
the oil paints, Mother, because I thought 
maybe they weren't sissy like the water 
colors Dad took away from me — the ones 
you got. I thought if that man had them 
in his office maybe other little boys played 
with them too, so I might — but Dad said 
it was the same thing." 

id, 



Meta smiled down at him. "Never mine 






darling, maybe Daddy will think about it 
some more one of these days." 

"Oh, I don't care," he said airily. "If 
they're sissy I don't want them anyway, 
Dad says there are other things I can do." 

"You mean like your boxing lessons, 
Chuckie? You haven't told me anything 
yet about Mr. Miller." 

"He's all right." Chuckie squatted and 
stared at something on the floor. Then he 
bent his head lower and said in a tight 
little voice, "Mother, I don't want to talk 
about that." 

What could you do? What could you 
do about a little boy who kept running 
away from you? Who was so frightened 
now that he wouldn't trust anybody? It 
wasn't faith that made Chuckie tremble 
before his father. It was fear. And she was 
supposed to stand helplessly by, and not 
lift a hand toward the bewildered, lonely 
child . . . her child. 

The boxing lessons came on Fridays. 
Thursday nights Chuckie ate almost 
nothing, and his sleep was usually restless. 
One night he fell out of bed and when 
Meta, hearing the thud, came quickly to 
help him, he cringed from her. "No, no, I 
won't," he said hoarsely. "I won't put up 
my hands. Don't touch me — I can't — " 
Then he came awake and recognized her 
and surrendered, weeping, into her arms. 
Meta held him tightly, rocking him to 
and fro. It was so long since he'd let her 
hold him this way. Oh, he needed her! 
She lowered her head, for he was whis- 
pering something. "Mother, I want the 
light, please, please," she heard. 

"Of course, darling — of course, Chuckie. 
Don't be frightened, my love," she said, 
her lips against his hair. Suddenly she 
was aware that Ted had come into the 
shadowy room. 

"He's not frightened," he said sharply. 
"Are you, Chuckie? You know and I know 
that there's nothing to be frightened of. 
Come on, fellow. No tears." Murderous 
hatred pounded in Meta's throat. Couldn't 
he let the child alone, let him give way for 
once! And yet — there was Chuckie, stiffen- 
ing, beginning already to pull away. 

Quietly she turned away, telling Ted she 
thought he would go right to sleep if they 
left him. But at the door she hesitated. "He 
asked for the light," she said unwillingly. 
"Don't you think we ought to — " 

Ted glanced back at the flat little form 
in the bed. "Chuckie? You don't want this 
light, do you, old man?" 

"Oh, no!" Chuckie jerked upright. "Oh, 
no. Dad. I don't need the light on. I don't 
really want it. Only — please leave the 
door open, Dad?" His voice quavered on 
the last words, and Meta went swiftly out 
to blink tears from her eyes. As they sep- 
arated at her room she said, "He did ask 
for it, you know. I wasn't inventing that." 

"I don't doubt it," Ted said agreeably. 
"With a little encouragement a child will 
ask for almost anything, don't you find? 
A light or a drink of water." 

Meta's control cracked. "How can you 
be so utterly blind and stupid? Don't you 
see he's paralyzed with fear of you? Some 
day the strain will be too much for him, 
and he'll break into a thousand pieces, and 
I'll have to stand by and watch and know 
that he could have been saved — " 

"Oh, go to bed," Ted said with uncon- 
cealed contempt. "You're hysterical. You're 
becoming so emotionally unstable I some- 



times wonder if you ought to be around 
Chuckie at all. Good night." The door 
of his bedroom slammed behind him. 

That was it, then. It couldn't go on 
any longer. He couldn't have shown more 
clearly the direction his thoughts had 
taken. It was no longer a question of mak- 
ing the best of marriage with Ted in 
order to protect Chuckie's home. Ted had 
joined battle — perhaps he had already 
talked to his lawyer. Now it was a matter 
of acting quickly, surely, to make certain 
he couldn't take Chuckie from her. 

Next morning, making an appointment 
with Ray Brandon by telephone, she 
realized that none of this had the feeling 
of great decision. How deluded she had 
been not to have faced it long ago— the 
inevitability of breaking with Ted. This 
didn't even seem like a crisis, now, be- 
cause they had been coming to it so slow- 
ly and over so long a period. The big 
thing now was to remain calm. 

She came close to panic, however, when 
she went up to say goodbye to Chuckie 
before going to Ray's office. He was having 
lunch, and didn't take much notice of 
her presence until he, eyes on the apple- 
sauce he was spooning up, said, "Mother 
when are you going away?" 

Meta said carefully, "What made you 
think I was going anywhere special, 
Chuckie? I'm just going downtown to 
see Uncle Ray right now, but I'm coming 
home after that." 

"I don't mean now. I mean for a long 
time." Dad said maybe you were going 
some time soon." 

Meta's whole body trembled. Dad said 
you might be going away . . . the ground- 
work already being laid! Had she waited 
too long? What arrogant certainty Ted 
had revealed in saying such a thing to 
Chuckie. "I'm not going anywhere with- 
out you, Chuckie. If I do go away you're 
coming with me." 

Iater, returning home, Meta thought 
j with almost wistful surprise how easy 
it was for a world to end. Wasn't there a 
poem somewhere, about the world ending 
not with a bang but with a whimper? Her 
world was ending that way now — her 
make-believe world of a home and family 
for Chuckie. Fizzling out . . . Ray had made 
it all so simple. He had arranged a plan 
which didn't require much of her. All she 
had to do was get herself and Chuckie out 
of the house and established in some 
safe place — with her family in Selby Flats 
he agreed, when Meta suggested that. 

Calling Papa was the hardest thing she 
had to do. She had seen so little of the 
family lately that she couldn't pretend it 
was just a routine visit she was planning. 
But Papa never asked questions of his 
children. He knew she would tell him in 
time. All he asked was, "What do you 
want me to explain to Trudy and Bill, 
Meta? What should I tell them?" 

In the stuffy phone booth, Meta 
shrugged. Make it definite; get it over with. 

"Yes, I see. Meta — you're sure?" 

"I saw Ray this afternoon, Papa. Ray 
Brandon — my lawyer." She knew this 
would convince Papa — and Trudy too, 
who might otherwise be inclined to argue 
— that her mind was made up. She was 
right; by dinnertime, when she and a 
somewhat surprised but docile Chuckie 
were established in the Bauer apartment, 
it was plain that the family had decided to 




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ask no questions, but to wait for what- 
ever she was ready to tell them. 

She felt no curiosity about Ted — about 
his reaction, about what he might be think- 
ing. She only held herself alert for what 
he might do. He saw his lawyer at once, 
of course; Ray told her he had been asked 
to try to arrange a reconciliation. Then 
one day Ted himself came, so unexpectedly 
that she barely had time to send Chuckie 
to his room before he was in the house. 
It was a brief, emotionless interview. Ted 
had planned it, she saw immediately, to 
give the impression that he wanted her 
back too. 

"You're my wife, Meta," he repeated 
several times. But it rang so false that 
even he didn't try very hard to convince 
her. It was Chuckie he wanted, and after 
a minute or so he made no bones about 
saying so. Meta said as little as possible. 

It wasn't hard to say nothing to Ted. 
She had nothing to say to him. Everything 
that had driven them apart had been 
talked over so often already . . . question 
and answer, charge and counter-charge, 
like a too-well-rehearsed play. 

She would have done almost anything 
to keep him from seeing Chuckie, but 
she knew — Ray had told her — that since, 
during the separation, Ted would have to 
contribute to Chuckie's support, the court 
would certainly arrange that Chuckie be 
with his father for regular periods. There 
was nothing Meta could do to prevent 
that, and when Ray told her Ted was to 
have Chuckie every Saturday and Sunday 
during the preliminary period she sub- 
mitted reluctantly. 

She was annoyed when Ted's lawyer 
called up during the first week of the ar- 
rangement and asked for a change. "Just 
this week," he explained, "Mr. White 
must leave town on Sunday, and he has 
asked if he might be with Chuckie Friday 
and Saturday instead. It's the two-day 
period the court arranged, you see, ex- 
cept that it's Friday instead of Sunday. 
Do you object?" 

Meta did object, but somehow she 
couldn't justify her objection. What logical 
reason could she have given for refusing? 
It seemed a very small thing at the time . . . 

She explained to Chuckie, on Friday 
morning, that his Dad was coming by for 
him. Chuckie took it calmly. Her hands 
shook with love and fear as she smoothed 
Chuckie's jacket and gave his cap a final 
straightening pat. She heard the bell ring, 



and remained in the bedroom as Chuckie 
started for the door. Abruptly, however, 
he came back and put his hands on hers. 
"Mother — it's Friday," he said, looking up 
at her anxiously. 

"Yes, darling — what about it?" 

Chuckie hesitated. "It's — it's my day 
for Mr. Miller," he brought out finally. 
"Mother — do you think Dad will make me 
go?" 

Meta squeezed his thin shoulders. "Oh, I 
don't think so today, Chuckie! Surely not. 
Probably he'll take you to lunch or any- 
thing you want to do." 

"Well, I hope not." He gave her a funny 
little smile. "I'll tell you," he said — it was 
a long time since he'd used that expres- 
sion! — "I don't like it at all, you know. If 
he asks me I'm going to say I — I just don't 
want to take those lessons! I don't have 
to, I guess — do I?" 

"No, darling, you don't have to at all. 
Go ahead now, Chuckie. Have a good 
time." Her heart added / wish you weren't 
going; I want you here with me. But 
Chuckie couldn't hear that. He tugged 
her down so his lips could reach her 
cheek, and then he went out. 

It wasn't very much, really, to remem- 
ber. 

Afterwards, Meta couldn't recall just 
what she had done that day, where she 
had been when they told her. Or who 
had told her, and how. Had it been her 
father? Had it been Bill? Or had she 
herself answered the telehpone when it 
rang? All that mattered was that with 
the blinding suddenness of earthquake, of 
some horrible cataclysm, she was on her 
way to the Selby Flats Hospital because 
Chuckie — Chuckie, her son — had been 
hurt. 

They took turns trying to explain it 
to her. She had friends there — Ross Boling. 
Dr. Mary Leland, others who knew her — 
and they tried to tell her quietly why 
Chuckie was lying there, bandaged and 
pale and still as death, unconscious. After- 
wards they checked with each other and 
agreed that it was obvious that she didn't 
take in a word any of them said. Papa and 
Trudy and Bill talked to her too; so did 
Charlotte Brandon, who came at once 
when she heard the news. She was like 
stone, they all thought; they waited for 
her to break down, to cry. Then perhaps 
she could begin to understand. But they 
were all quite wrong. Meta understood 
well enough that because of Ted, Chuckie 




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was lying there between life and death. 
She didn't speak because she needed all 
her strength for prayer . . . Day after 
day, and through the nights when they 
would let her, she sat there beside him or 
outside in the corridor. She was responsi- 
ble. She should never have let him go 
with Ted that day. 

Ross Boling, speaking to Charlotte, said, 
"It makes her feel better to blame herself 
— gives her something to do, in a way, 
while she's so helplessly waiting." But 
actually none of what had happened was 
Meta's fault. It was . . . well, it was hard 
to place blame. One of those things. 
Chuckie had been sent to his boxing lesson 
that day. He hadn't wanted to go; even 
Ted admitted that, for Ted White was 
almost as distraught as his wife when 
time wore on and Chuckie showed no 
hopeful signs. He hadn't wanted to go, 
but Ted had made him. And somehow, 
during the lesson, he had done something 
— backed away, not looking, and tripped 
against the ropes of the ring, and fallen 
headlong to the floor, striking his head 
on something there. They never knew 
what. 

Unbearably, it went on; the silent, 
motionless child, the mother, wait- 
ing. The hope growing fainter . . . One day 
Meta saw color in Chuckie's face. It wasn't 
imagination. Ross, called quickly by the 
nurse, confirmed it; but he didn't tell 
Meta that it wasn't the good sign she had 
been waiting for. Instead he went quickly 
out and called a specialist for consultation. 
They had been afraid of this, inflamma- 
tion, involvement with the lungs. 

She was alone at the hospital, in the 
corridor, when Chuckie died. Ross had 
the family called quickly, and the Bran- 
dons came too, but somehow Meta eluded 
hem all. The hospital attendants had 
ecome so used to seeing her there that 
hey didn't pay much attention. Charlotte 
ad seen her for a few minutes, right after 
t happened. Then her brother Bill saw 
er, and later on, when they had searched 
11 over and couldn't find her, he remem- 
ered she had said something about want- 
g a walk. He hadn't taken it seriously, 
inking she was too distraught to know 
hat she was saying. But if she had left 
e hospital, where was she? 
It was so logical, when Meta explained 
to Joe Roberts. Quite reasonable. With- 
t making any decision, she had taken 
e direction that led toward Beverly 
ills, toward Ted's house. Chuckie needed 
clothes, she was thinking; a suit to be 
- buried in. The little white suit of which 
he had been specially fond last summer. 
I Mrs. Winters saw her too, when she 
let her in. The news, of course, had 
come; and the housekeeper was weeping 
:tas she tried to say a few words to her 
•former mistress. But Meta just looked at 
her stonily, and said, "I'm going to get 
Chuckie's suit." 

"Mr. White is in the library, Mrs. 
White—" 

■ "Don't tell him," Meta cut in. "I don't 
want to see him." 

It was too late; Ted had heard her 
voice and was standing at the library door. 
''Meta," he said. "I was praying you would 
:ome." 

"I don't want to see you," Meta re- 
lated. Then, like a woman in a dream, 
he turned. "Praying? What do you know 



about praying?" she asked curiously. 

"Come in by the fire," he pleaded. 
"You're all damp. You've been walking 
in the fog." 

"How solicitous you are, Ted," Mrs. 
Winters heard her say. She went into the 
library with slow, dream-like steps, leav- 
ing the door open. Mrs. Winters said 
later that she felt queer about the whole 
thing. Mrs. White looked so odd; of 
course it was a terrible time for her and 
for Mr. White too, but still . . . She lin- 
gered, and heard Meta say again, "You're 
the man who's not afraid of anything, Ted. 
Why do you need to pray?" 

Mr. White said something, and there 
was a sound ... a drawer opening. Meta 
didn't remember that, later. She didn't 
remember opening the desk drawer, didn't 
know how she'd gotten there. But suddenly 
Ted's gun was in her hand, and she was 
seeing with surprise the terrible dawn of 
fear in Ted's eyes. 

"You're frightened! How odd . . . 
Chuckie isn't afraid any more, you know. 
Chuckie's dead, Ted. Oh — but you know 
that. You killed him, didn't you?" 

"Meta!" His voice was tense. "Put down 
that thing. What are you — " 

She went on as though he hadn't spoken. 
"No, Chuckie doesn't have to be afraid 
any more. Of all those things, the water, 
the darkness. The boxing, Ted! Think of 
it. And you're frightened instead, aren't 
you? That's odd. That you should be 
afraid of anything, let alone this." 

Outside the room, the listening house- 
keeper heard another sound — movement, 
she didn't know what. Then everything 
happened at once — Mr. White's shout of 
"Meta! Don't!" and the simultaneous ex- 
plosion of the gunshot cutting across his 
voice. There was one blank, thunderstruck 
second for realization — another to run into 
the room. Meta White was still there, the 
gun in her hand, looking almost absent- 
mindedly at the body as it slumped in its 
last, horribly final movement. 

That was the story Mrs. Winters 
told the police when they came in 
answer to her urgent summons. There was 
no need for haste. Meta wasn't going any- 
where. Meta didn't seem to know what 
had happened, and the police were irri- 
tated when she kept telling them that 
Chuckie was dead. About Ted White, shot 
to instant death in his library, she said not 
a word. 

It was a long time before the rest of the 
story emerged. A piece here and there 
came from the Bauers, from Charlotte — 
the gleanings of outsiders who couldn't 
know precisely what went on between Ted 
and Meta and Chuckie. Only when Joe 
Roberts made his strangely important en- 
trance into Meta's life did she begin to 
talk, to fill in the emotional jigsaw that 
had finally formed a picture of violent 
death. As Ray Brandon worked over Meta's 
defense, he sometimes wondered if Meta 
herself knew what an impact Joe Roberts 
had made in her life. Joe knew he was in 
love with Meta. But nobody knew about 
Meta. Was it coincidence that when she 
met Joe she began to seem more normal, 
more like a real, living woman, a woman 
in terrible trouble but willing to fight? 
Or was it something to do with Joe? 

Was it, Ray wondered, that Meta White 
somehow knew that in Joe Roberts she 
would find again a reason for living? 




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101 



THEY ALL KNOW ME ! 



(Continued from page 56) writers. That's 
like a newly-born herring afraid he might 
run out of ocean. I soon realized that the 
number of songwriters in this country is 
exactly two less than the total population; 
those two are myself and Roy Rogers' 
horse — and I'm not too sure about him. 

Now that my name is linked with SFS, 
everyone — and that includes everyone with 
a song — seems to know me. I am automati- 
cally classified as musically bent, despite 
all my pleas and documented evidence of 
bad ear drums, scratchy larynx and zero 
training. I am the prime target of anybody 
who can draw five fairly parallel lines and 
splatter ink in between. Elevator operators 
stop cars between floors to let me in on a 
sure-fire hit. My dentist leaves me strapped 
in and stranded with a mouthful of dredg- 
ing tools while he gargles off thirty-two bars 
of his latest gem. Everyone has a tune. 
I'm convinced that Tin Pan Alley runs 
through every town in the country. 

Oddly enough, for a guy who's stupid 
(basically unversed) in music, my two big 
breaks have been directly linked with musi- 
cal successes. Broadway's "Music In My 
Heart" started my bookings in the better 
clubs, and Songs For Sale has since won 
me the emcee spot on the big CBS Satur- 
day night Sing It Again musical extrava- 
ganza. Strange doings for a guy who's 
noticeably gun shy at the sight of a kazoo. 

Of course the section of New York's 
Bronx where I was raised never had much 
need of formal music at home. We had the 
usual continuous big city symphony — pea- 
nut whistles, car horns, trolley bells, fire 
sirens. Our family did love music in the 
theater, however, and especially on the 
vaudeville stage. My mother used to take 
me every week when the bill changed at 
Loew's Boulevard, and there I learned to 
love show business. My mother was a very 
sick woman most of her adult life, and her 
only escape was enjoying good entertain- 
ment. 

Frequently Mother would be too ill to 
attend the theater, and I would go alone. 
When I came home, I tried to recreate all 
the fun of the eight acts I had seen. Thus 
my very humble beginning, playing to a 
small but very important audience of one. 

This practice of mimicry first came in 
handy one night at a teen-age party when 
I got a crush on the hostess. Seeing my 
chance to make the big impression, I took 
a friend of mine aside and hurriedly pieced 
together a sketch from assorted vaudeville 
bits. We put on a show at midnight. I was 
all set to sweep the hostess off her feet when 
in our last routine I knocked over her 
mother's pet vase. I was never invited back. 

But the evening was not a complete flop. 
Present at the party were several members 
of the Cavalier social club. They invited 
my friend and me to attend their party 
the following week and entertain for them. 
I was then invited to join the club, later 
became its president and arranged shows 
every Saturday night for two years. 

My early ambition had been to study 

law, but I had to leave high school two 

years before graduation to work. My father 

R was a textile worker, and I became an 

M errand boy and junior clerk in the dress 

trade. I enjoyed the work, particularly the 

selling, but couldn't wait until the summer 
102 



when I worked as an entertainer at a resort 
hotel. 

An agent saw me perform at a benefit 
and came backstage to ask me if I had 
ever worked in Baltimore. "Baltimore, 
Baltimore, let me see," I mused, knowing 
I had never worked any city. 

"Boy, you're terrific!" he gushed. 
"They've never seen anything like you. I'll 
book you there right this minute. It's fifty 
dollars a week to start. You'll get raises 
and probably stay there twenty years." 

He was very convincing, and it all seemed 
highly probable. I said enough goodbyes to 
the neighbors to last them twenty years. 
All my relatives, father, mother, aunts and 
uncles came down to Penn Station. Twenty 
years! ... I was home before they got to 
sleep that night. 

It happened fast. I arrived at the Two 

O'Clock Club in Baltimore, did my first 

show, and the boss came over and said, 

"You didn't unpack yet, did you, Jan? 

.Well, don't." 

"What's the matter?" I inquired. "Didn't 
you like the show?" 

"Don't worry," he assured me. "The 
next show will be much better." He was 
right. I wasn't in it. 

I was certainly unhappy, and almost quit 
the business at that precise moment, Balti- 
more time. Then I calmed down enough 
to realize that I had failed not through 
lack of effort, but through a lack of ex- 
perience. Nothing worthwhile was ever easy. 

My next lesson was the opposite extreme, 
conceit. I landed a spot at Max Rudnick's 
El Tinge Theater and pocketed forty dol- 
lars for my first week's work. Three days 
later Max astounded me with an unheard 
of thirty-week contract at eighty-five dollars 
weekly. I signed and before the ink was 
dry my head was so big I had to leave 
through the freight doors. After I had been 
there six weeks, an agent came backstage 
and told me if I quit the El Tinge, he would 
have me on the Kate Smith program in 
two months. 

I sauntered in to ask Max Rudnick to 
relinquish my contract. He gently advised 
me that I was not polished enough. 

With youthful arrogance I demanded my 
release. Reluctantly Max gave it to me, 
and wished me luck with all sincerity. I 
signed with my new manager. 

Not only did I never get on the Kate 
Smith show, but I didn't get a single job 
in the six months I was with him. Back I 
went to the long struggle of small vaude- 



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ville houses and minor night spots. Then, 
suddenly things got better. That is, if you 
call six years sudden. 

I began playing better clubs, was selected 
by Eddie Davis to act as his own replace- 
ment at Leon and Eddie's while he recov- 
ered from an illness. It was my first good 
New York engagement. Next my first 
Broadway booking at Loew's State. Things 
were beginning to come my way. 

I've had many interesting assignments: 
guest appearances with the incomparable 
Hildegarde, a role in a CBS comedy series, 
a tour of England and France with USO 
troupes. In each new environment I've 
learned something. All these associations 
have proved invaluable, not only in my 
work but in conversing with our guests on 
Songs For Sale. 

In talking with these newcomers to show 
business — and songwriting is definitely 
show business — the number one question, 
of course, is how do you get started. I can 
only answer for myself and tell my story 
as it happened. I'm convinced that there is 
no magic pattern, no sure-fire formula. Ask 
the question of any ten performers, you 
will get ten different stories; all have 
known different problems, different condi- 
tions. The words that recur most often in 
all are persistence and hard work. 

I've grown accustomed to late hours, as 
has my pretty wife, the former actress Toni 
Kelly. We never retire before three a.m., 
a left-over habit from years of working late 
in night spots. I spend a lot of time with 
my nine-year-old son Warren, who's firmly 
convinced that "Take Me Out to the Ball 
Game" is our national anthem. Little 
daughter Celia, just eleven months old, so 
far has confined her activities in this ever- 
changing world to ever changing. Aside 
from that, I seriously suspect she may turn 
out to be musically bent. 

Mystery stories are a favorite. I'm a 
tremendous movie fan too, especially for 
action pictures. I could enjoy steak and 
milk (no potatoes or bread, please) three 
times a day, am too extravagant when I 
buy a suit, have a collection of Jolson 
records; in the shower I hit unbelievable 
notes doing "How Deep Is the Ocean," and 
qualify for both indoor and outdoor 
Olympic records as the most unhandy man 
who never fixed a toaster cord. Lucky for 
me home-loving Toni is as handy with the 
pipe wrench and hack saw as she is with 
needles and noodles. 

Confidentially, I hope to regain all pres- 
tige lost to mechanical gadgets about the 
house by my appearance as a graduation 
exercise notable. Yep. Recently I hap- 
pened to mention my old Public School 
75 on the air; the next day the principal 
called up and invited me to their gradua- 
tion ceremonies. He even asked me to be 
present on the platform as a distinguished 
alumnus. I plan to place my entire clan 
in the audience and have them properly 
impressed with my importance. Toaster 
cords, phooey! 

Just one thing haunts me. Since the 
principal heard me on SFS, maybe he, too, 
thinks I'm musically bent. Possibly he 
may even have the big mahogany piano 
placed, expecting me to grind out a few 
thousand decibels of Debussy. 

Won't anyone believe me? I love Songs 
for Sale ... I love the people ... I love 
the music. But honest, I'm just not bent 
thataway. 



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Your first cake of Camay brings a 




A SKIN FOR 
WEDDING BELLS! 





*"" 








/ 



#$#W7t/ 






This is MRS. CORNELIUS LORENZEN, Jr., 

the former Barbara Jean Shaw of New Jersey- 

a lovely Camay Bride! 

There's an ingenue's fresh appeal about 
Barbara Lorenzen — a "little girl" charm 
that wins you from the first meeting. Her 
coloring is in soft pastels — her complexion, 
softer than satin itself. Barbara's first cake 
of Camay made her a gift of new beauty 

When friends inquire about her beauty 
care, Barbara has a ready answer. She say 
with conviction: "At last I've found a 
beauty soap that's made for my skin- 
Camay. When I changed to regular Camay 
care, my first cake of Camay brought 
a fresher, clearer complexion." 

There's new beauty waiting for you, too— 
with your first cake of Camay. Change to 
regular care— use only mild, gentle, 
rich-lathering Camay. Never use a lesser 
soap — and Camay will wake 
the sleeping beauty of your skin! 




All your skin's lovelier! 

Yes, all your skin gets a rewarding beauty 
treatment— when you use Camay in your 
bath, too. A daily Camay Beauty Bath 
brings arms and legs and shoulders that 
"beautifully cared-for" look. It leaves you 
lovelier from head to toes — touched with 
Camay's flattering fragrance. 





C Q 




the soap of beautiful women 



In all the world — 
no finer beauty soap! 

For mildness, for fragrance, for quick, rich 
lather— it's hard to imagine a finer beauty 
soap than Camay! Always ask for the big 
thrifty "Beauty-Bath" size. It gives more 
lather, more luxury, more of everything 
you like about Camay. 




■MBHMBHI 



dm yoa btf 







What mates her -teeth 
so Sparkling bright-?.. The answer 
islPAWA! 




lk o»tm jj- [PANA 



Whaf makes her mouth 
so Sparkling fresh?.. -rf,e answer 
is IPANA! 



for cleaner, healthier teeth ! 



Yes, you really sparkle when you 
use Ipana. This tooth paste gets 
your teeth cleaner, reveals the 
hidden sparkle of your smile — 
and helps prevent tooth decay. 



You'll love Ipana's sparkling 
taste and tingle, too— leaves your 
mouth fresher, breath sweeter. 
Get Ipana Tooth Paste today for 
your Smile of Beauty! 

A Product of Bristol-Myers 



<*v 



She's always 
swamped with dates! 



for really cleansing 
-teeth and mouth, the answer 
, is IPANA! 



L 





The answer 
is IPANA! 



^^ 



.'. 1 



<\ 


















«£W 



0&//S0& 



•««^, 



YOU OTHER 

GIRLS CATCH 

ALL THE DATES! 

THE MEN ALL 

6ET AWAY 

FROM ME.' 



HONEY, YOU 
COULD STOP THAT 
IF YOU'D ONLY SEE 
YOUR DENTIST! GET 
HIS ADVICE ON -ON 
BAD BREATH, SUE.' 



. s* 



•4-. 



COLGATE DENTAL CREAM CLEANS 
YOUR BREATH WHILE IT CLEANS YOUR 

TEETH. AND THE COLGATE WAY OF 

BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING 

STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST! 



/f<o* 






READER'S DIGEST* Reported The Same 

Research Which Proves That Brushing Teeth 

Right After Eating with 

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM 
STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST 

Reader's Digest recently reported the 
same research which proves the Colgate 
way of brushing teeth right after eating 
stops tooth decay best! The most thor- 
oughly proved and accepted home meth- 
od of oral hygiene known today! 

Yes, and 2 years' research showed the 
Colgate way stopped more decay for more 
people than ever before reported in denti- 
frice history! No other dentifrice, ammo- 
niated or not.offers such conclusive proof 





Use Colgate Dental Cream 
'/To Clean Your Breath 
v While You Clean Your Teeth- 
■< And Help Stop Tooth Decay! 




♦YOU SHOULD KNOW! While not mentioned by name, 
Colgate's was the only toothpaste used in the research 
on tooth decay recently reported in Reader's Digest. 



AUGUST, 1951 RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR VOL. 36, NO. 3 



Contents 

Keystone Edition 

Doris McFerran, Editor; Jack Zasorin, Art Director; Matt Basile, Art Editor; 

Josephine Pearson, Assistant Editor; Marie Haller, Assistant Editor; 

Dorothy Brand, Editorial Assistant; Esther Foley, Home Service Director; 

Television Assistant: Frances Kish; 

Helen Cambria Bolstad, Chicago Editor; Lyle Rooks, Hollywood Editor; 

Frances Morrin, Hollywood Assistant Editor; Hymie Fink, Staff Photographer; 

Betty Jo Rice, Assistant Photographer 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



People 

on the 

Air 



8 International Circus 

15 Best Answers to Dr. Jim Brent problem 

16 The Bandleader 
IS Father's Children 
22 Who's Who In TV 

27 A Letter From Bill Lawrence 

28 Here's Mary Margaret ... by Jo Pearson 
32 Phil's Family ... by Fredda Balling 

34 Rosemary Asks: How Much Faith Should A Woman Have In Her 
(Husband? 

30 My Boss, Gordon MacRae ... by Betty Cooley 

38 Wasn't It A Lovely Wedding? ... by Betty Baker 

40 On Being A Person ... by Laraine Day 

42 What Rhymes With James? 

44 Bailey's Barbecue 

48 Live Each Day ... by Frances Kish 

50 Young Widder Brown 

Special Section: Saturday Viewing 

56 A Date With Judy 

58 I Cover Times Square ... by Johnny Warren 

60 Two Girls Named Smith 

62 Faith Baldwin's Theatre of Romance 

66 Lonesome Gal 

72 Mystery Mirror 

90 Radio Television Mirror Reader Bonus: The Ways of 
by Nora Drake 

6 Art Linkletter's Nonsense and Some-Sense 

12 Beauty Through Bows ... by Dorry Ellis 

14 Security Begins At Home ... by Terry Burton 

1 9 Poetry 

25 Fun of the Month 

48 How To Be A Hostess ... fay Dorothy Doan 

52 Daytime Serial Fashions For You 

54 Very Peachy! ... by Nancy Craig 

64 Junior Mirror 



Love 



... 



For 
Better 

hiring 



Your 

local 

Station 



4 WORL: Rx. Music 

lO WPEN: Sports— Either Way 

20 WOR: Junior Rambler 

24 WGR: Three From Buffalo 



Inside 
Radio 



21 Information Booth 

75 Program Highlights in Television Viewing 

97 Daytime Diary 

On the Cover: Mary Margaret McBride, color portrait by Maxwell Coplan. 

Gordon MacRae, color portrait by Hymie Fink and Sterling Smith 

p. 12 — Bows courtesy of Century Ribbon Mills, Inc. 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publication, ]tac.. New 
York, N. Y., average net paid circulation 470,024 for o 
months ending June 30, 1950. 
EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 

205 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills. Calif., and 
221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. Harold A Wise. Presi- 
dent: James L. Mitchell and Fred R. Sammis. Vice Presidents; 
Meyer Dworkln, Secretary and Treasurer. Advertising offices 
also in Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
sions, and Canada. $5.00 per year for all other countries. 
CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a recent 
issue. Address changes can be made only if you send us your 

Member of The TRUE 



old as well as your new address. Write to Radio Tele- 
vision Mirror, 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17. N. Y. 
MANUSCRIPTS, DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should be 
accompanied by addressed envelope and return postage and 
will be carefully considered, but publisher cannot be re- 
sponsible for loss or injury. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter Feb. 13, 1051, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail. P. O. Dept.. Ottawa, 
Ont., Canada. Copyright 1951 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
Ail rights reserved under International Copyright Conventon. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Llterarla y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Group 









MA Sister! 




you're snubbed «£* ly begged to^nt ^ 

th e very man wh o, tat J you don t Me e 

don't like such treaanen, ^ yQU say ot do to ^ 

-*"* Tdterie tgbt betote ? Whatever . was, , 

ro a nto°ata start on your vacanon. 



V* 






y° 66 



though sometimes ^f^^bS- 
rases of halitosis ate d r . 



ac uvebee^a-careful 



Listeriae Anasepac « t ^ nS and 

otecaution because it for e 

Ketensthebreath — n ^ ^ 

seconds °< ..f^dU't «f .»*£ 
hours usuaUy^ So iistedne AnU se P tic 

shifts . • • . 
before every date. 



BEFORE ANY DATE. 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC.il s breath 




TAKINGS 



I 




music 




Every year medical men are learning 
more about the large part music 
plays in the healing of the mentally ill. 
They might do well to consult with disc 
jockey Bob Swan of WORL. Boston, 
who has had considerable success on 
his own in bringing peace of mind to 
both hospital patients and everyday 
listeners. 

The Armed Forces Radio Service 
carries Bob's Swan Boat to Army vet- 
erans at a hospital near Boston. Last 
year the Canadian American Writers 



Association took note of his work with 
their Radio Achievement Award for 
musical entertainment. Figuring largely 
in their presentation were numerous 
letters from patients of TB sanitariums 
commending his program. 

That his show may have some thera- 
peutic value pleases Bob, but he has no 
idea of entering the field of medicine 
beyond curing the blues. The title of 
doctor is strictly informal and was con- 
ferred upon him by affectionate listen- 
ers. The stethoscope is reserved for 



the romantic heartbeats of his wife. 

The music Bob plays is slow and 
quiet. After experimenting with all 
types, he found that a steady diet of 
loud brassy music disturbed his nerves, 
while soft, dreamy numbers were sooth- 
ing and relaxing. Listeners welcomed 
the change of pace from the hammer- 
ing beat of the boppers, radical pro- 
gressives, and hillbillies. 

Boston audiences agree — a visit to 
"Doctor Swan" is often the best pre- 
scription for a case of "Worryitis." 



R 

M 












"You'll see 
the difference 
a lovely 
figure makes!" 







Mary is winning new admirers with every 

appearance. She stays trim, lithe and lovely 

— and her star grows steadily brighter. 




Millionths-of-a-second picture shows how a Playtex Girdle 
combines amazing figure-slimming power with complete com- 
fort and freedom of action. Made of smooth latex, Playtex fits 
and feels like a second skin— creates a slimmer, trimmer you. 
At all department stores and better specialty shops everywhere. 



Shapely young screen star now captivating audiences 
with personal appearances suggests you wear- 

Invisible Playtex" Girdles 



No wonder Playtex Girdles are the favorite with Hollywood 
stars, with famous designers, with millions of U. S. women! 
Ask yourself two questions about a girdle: how does it 
make you look— and feel? Best answer comes from Playtex, 
for it slims you from waist to thighs without a seam, stitch 
or bone— so comfortable! And Playtex Girdles fit invisibly 
under clothes, wash, dry faster than any other girdles! 



Choose 
from the 3 
most popular 
Girdles 
in the 
world 



ANNE FOGARTY designs Mary's favorite clothes, 
says: "For every day, for sports, for dress and cas- 
ual wear, Playtex gives you figure flattery plus fig- 
ure freedom. It's a designer's dream girdle!" 



ON TV PLAYTEX Presents "fashion magic". Top afternoon entertain- 
ment. CBS-TV nationwide network, (see local paper for time and channel) 





PLAYTEX LIVING® GIRDLE 

More figure-control, greater free- 
dom than girdles at triple the price. 
SLIM, silvery tube . $3.95 and $4.95 

PLAYTEX PINK-ICE GIRDLE 

Made by a new latex process. It's 
light, fresh, dispels body heat. In 
SLIM, pink tube . $4.95 and $5.95 

PLAYTEX FAB-LINED GIRDLE 

With fabric next to your skin. Look 
slim, feel wonderfully comfortable. 
In SLIM, golden tube $5.95 and $6.95 

All prices slightly higher in Canada and Foreign Countries 

Sizes: extra-small, small, medium, large 
— extra-large size slightly higher. 

INTERNATIONAL LATEX CORPORATION 
Playtex Park ©iqsi Dover Del. 

PLAYTEX LTD. Montreal Canada 



I I 




ff YOU'VE S^ 

lN TVllNP— ^ k City as 

Unla "lnt^ seitl * 
a tenement 



READERS' OWN VERSE- 

Precancelled 

The letters that I pl an each night 
Lr^ to get to write: g 
But wlufe it's nothing that I tell 
Wuhpnde^tWeallyjust^^,, 
Since any that I ever wrote ' 
Stayed ln the pocket of my coat. 
—S. H. Dewhurst 



&m 



onsense 



and some-sense 



kind is usually cau of 

name-ior exa-ple^ J „ P^ 

sheep is cal Jf d -^ „ r oup names 
Y ou choose the tight fW ^ A 

\ oX the iollo^mg anxma & ^ 
group oi nonnds- ca 2 

herd (b) P.** f^d a (a) 
group of lions vs 3 

llony lb) covey J P^ a 

t.f2a V ^ CO ** 

Answers: 



. ( ,)-«t(oy«iW)^ 




n : 

is" 




READER'S OWN VERSE- 



AUGUST 

-to start off I can freely predict, 
without recourse to my faithfu 
inendThe Old Farmer's Alma- 
nac, that we will have heat in 
August by day and by night. Shim- 
mermg, fry-eggs-on-the-pavement 
hotness, so thick you ought to be 

able to cut out a hunk and put it 
away for next winter. That's a 
good way to get through the dog 
days-remember how you slipped 
and slid on the ice last winter, 
how your toes tingled and your 
nose grew rosy, and decide Aug- 
ust isn t such a bad month, a f ter 
all. Having got that off my chest, 
1 ll now tak « a peek at the Al- 
manac and see how Link's pre- 
dictions stack up with those of 
the gents in the predicting busi- 
ness. What d 'you know-rain, it 
says here. First week, fine. But 
not the last two weeks; they'll be 
wet ones and no mistake . 
August also brings along with it 
the sneeziest of the assorted hay 
lever seasons, when ragweed 
comes to its own, and goldenrod 
Hits its yellow head. There'll be 
running noses and weeping eyes 
and ka-chooing and bless-youing 
"-Plenty ... The August flower 
ot-the-month, gladiola; the birth- 
stone, peridot or sardonyx. Now 
I know what a sardonyx is, but 
what m tunket's a peridot? Time 
out for consultation with Mr 
Webster, unabridged, who says: 
A deep, yellowish-green variety 
of crysolite." Sounds pretty. 



■ 



Speaking of August, I m sure rt 
could win a walk as The Month 

In Which Men Like Not To Wear 
A Necktie Most. Which thought 
led to a little research on the sub- 
ject of woman's favorite Christ- 
mas present to the male Did you 

know that there's a Man s Tie 
Foundation— to which, inciden- 
tally I'm indebted for the follow- 
ing tidbits . • • The Paisley pat- 
tern was brought to England from 
Persia by Sir Francis Drakes 
sailors in 1580. They used pieces 
of the gay material to tie up 
their pigtails-standard maritime 

equipment then . . - Undisputed 
leader of London fashion in the 
early seventeenth century was 
Beau Brummell, who dressed 
each morning as if it were a sa- 
cred ceremony, the climax ot 
which was the reverent knotting 
of his white tie. Protective col- 
lars and ties of steel were issued 
to officers of the U.S. Marines in 
the early 1800's. Enlisted men 
were issued leather collars-from 
which came "Leathernecks. . . • 
In the late eighteenth century, 
red faces were considered a sign 
of health. Men pulled their ties 
tight to make their faces flush— 
which also, unfortunately, made 
them pop-eyed. 



Art Linkletter emcees House , Party, 
Monday through Friday at 3.30 VM. 
EDT over the Columbia Broadcasting 
System; sponsored by PiUsbury Mills. 



™* DICKENS SAW , Ts 

-gile form C Un 4ic h 0r hT y 
^e pa n ti ng spirit fr Cl \ he ,et s 
virtues rise t 1 "' a hundr «* 

cw ity r n v w t p t : of r? 

Wo 'Jd and bless 5" ^ the 








PAUSE AND CONSIDER DEPT. 

You may not have realized it but 
a group of people has been work 
-gon you The y Ve spent ot r 
halt a milium dollars through 
prorno tlon dispJays ^ ^ 

-tores and restaurants, and 
trough an advertising campaign 
^--fthebiggesf magaS 
and ln newspapers. What are 
they aiming f or? They want to 
convince you that you ought to 
dnnk iced tea! As for me I 
don t need any urging. Give me 
n hammock, something interest- 
ing to read and a nice tall «rJ a 
-d I'„ sli, .through Sgust'ftg' 
days with hardly a proSst Loif 
dolls up our iced tea i„ various 
ways— sometimes with a piece of 
lemon _ or lime to squeeze h£ it 

sometimes with the lemon or lime 
juice stored right in, making a 

ort of lemon-iced-ade-tea. Some- 
times she spikes it with a juicy 
finger of f resh pineapp]e ^ 
cool spng of mint. Sometimes a 

tea before the ice is added. I n 
tact, I suspect that Lois regards 
"; 6d tea as the French pefsan 
woman regards the stew p t- 
anything and everything ? you 
have on hand goes into it As a 
garter of f act , if my ^^ 

the slightest consideration for its 
husband and father, toiling here 

would* °l tyPeWiter ' SO -°- 
would rush me in a l ong , co I d 

refreshing glass right now Wh at ' 
does a fellow have to do to 





for a 




hair-do 








every day 
all day 

wear the new.modern 

HAIR NETS 




'PERMANIZED" . RUN-RESISTANT 

(a Gayla exclusive!) 

Grooms Hair-dos — Saves Waves 

Invisible — Tru-Color Hair Shades 



more women use 

HOLDBOB* 

bobby pins than 
all other brands 
combined. 

set curia easier 
hold hair-dos better 

O 1951 SAYI.0fl0 PRODUCTS, INCORPORATED, CHICAGO, ILL. 




l 



nternationa 



circus 



• If you're somewhere between the ages 
of four and ten, it doesn't matter whether 
you come from Afghanistan, India, China, 
Russia or Yugoslavia — the circus is the 
only show on earth. Eighty-six excited 
youngsters, children of United Nations 
delegates from all over the world, recently 
spent an afternoon full of balloons, dolls, 
puppets, ice cream, clowns and animals, 
as special guests of TV stars Howdy 
Doody, Bob Smith and Clarabell. 

Nasrine Varasteh of Iran summed up 
the general delight : "I'm so glad I'm going 
to see the circus because I won't be able 
to see it when I go back to Iran. I like 
New York very much and will be sorry 
to leave because in school we are going 
to learn many things about many people 
in other lands." Nasrine may not be here 
to have the rest of her lessons, but she had 
her first lesson in international understand- 
ing that day. 

Howdy Doody Time is 5:30 P.M. EDT, Monday- 
Friday, over NBC-TV. Participating sponsors. 




We're off to the circus! In a flurry of 
balloons and streamers, Bob Smith and 
United Nations' children wave goodby. 




Almost too excited to pose for their 
pictures, are representatives of Belgium, 
Pakistan, Poland, Afghanistan, Ecuador. 




Home was never like this! Alicia and 
Carmen Albornoz, young delegates from 
Ecuador, display their Howdy Doody dolls. 




Clarabell has a man-to-man talk with 
Alan Dessault of Belgium. Alan is in 
the costume of a miniature palace guard. 




Vivienne Yu of China doesn't know 
what to do first — cuddle her new doll, 
eat ice cream, or gape at circus antics. 



Are* you in the know ? 




If you and your pal are smitten by the same Sigh Man, should you — 



I I Date him Q Bow out nobly 

Let's say you and your best pal are vacation- 
ing at a Dude Ranch. Gals meet cowboy — 
and you're both "gone" dogies! If you are 
the one he favors, why bow out? Suggest a 
double date; your femme friend may have 
a pleasant change of heart. Whatever the 



Q Suggest a double date 

plans, you needn't cower in a corner just 
because it's that time. Come slacks, jeans or 
datin' duds, no one will know, with Kotex 
— for those flat pressed ends prevent reveal- 
ing outlines — shore 'nuff! And that special 
safety center gives extra protection. 





With sleeveless dresses, 
which goes best? 

□ A stole 
I I A razor 
I I Long gloves 

Daintiness— and sleeveless frocks— call for 
underarm contact with the razor's edge. 
Keeps you out of the untidy bracket. 
Promotes poise. Self-assurance at calendar 
time calls for just the right answer to your 
sanitary protection needs. So Kotex gives 
you 3 absorbencies to choose from (different 
sizes, for different days). By trying all 3 
you'll learn which one's exactly right for you. 



When hickeys heckle you, 
what helps? 

I I Change your makeup 
□ Court "old Sol" 
O Shun the sun 

If your complexion's an oil gusher— it's 
boom time for hickeys ! To dry 'em out, sun 
bathing's good, but don't get sizzled. Change 
your makeup to calamine: a flesh-tinted 
lotion that helps conceal and heal break- 
outs. Fine for problem day blemishes, too. 
Kotex helps keep you confident, at ease, 
because Kotex is made to stay soft while 
you wear it ; has softness that holds its shape. 




More ivome/7 c/ioose KOTEX* 
f/ia/7 a// offer san/fary na/?6/hs 

3 ASSORBEHC/ES.- REGULAR. JU/V/OR, SURER 



T. M. REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



Have you tried Delsey* ? It's the new bathroom tissue 
that's safer because it's softer. A product as superior 
as Kotex. A tissue as soft and absorbent as Kleenex.* 
(We think that's the nicest compliment there is.) 




ports 
either 
way 



Batting practice can 
be fun when your dad 
is a sportscaster. 
WPEN's Matt Guokas 
gives son a few tips. 

Matt Jr. sneaks a bite 
of cake while Mom 
isn't looking — so he 
thinks. Sister Mary 
finds it amusing. 






Had it not been for a serious auto- 
mobile accident in 1946, Matt 
Guokas might never have entered 
radio. Up to that time Matt was headed 
for an active career in basketball; after- 
wards, with extensive knowledge as a 
participator in every sport behind him, 
he turned to broadcasting sports events. 
The ex-ace of the National Basketball 
Association soon became the ace sports- 
caster of WPEN in Philadelphia. In- 
stead of playing basketball, he started 
to describe the game with the authority 
of one who really knows it. 

Well-known in the world of sports, 
Matt became a basketball sensation 
while still in college. Once out of 
school he continued his sports career, 
mixing professional basketball with soc- 
cer and baseball. Even the Army did 
not stop Matt, and the team he coached 
and played for won the West Coast 
title. 

In January of 1949, after several 
years as a free lance sportscaster, Matt 
joined the WPEN sports staff. It was 
only a few months before Matt became 
Sports Director for the station. Besides 
his play-by-play accounts of all major 
sports events, Matt also transfers his 
vast knowledge of sports to listeners in 
a nightly round-up of local sports news 
each evening and comes through with 
the Pre-Game Warm-Up before all the 
Phillies' games. 

Strictly a family man, Matt spends 
whatever spare time he has with his 
wife, Joan, and his family. Relaxing 
the Guokas way usually means a swift 
catch or some batting practice for Matt 
Jr. His daughter, Mary, while far from 
being a "tomboy" excels in school 
sports and studies ballet as well. 

In spite of their many extra curricu- 
lar activities the children are both "A" 
students. Matt takes great pride in the 
sport activities of Matt Jr., and tries to 
develop not only sport technique in the 
boy, but a true spirit of sportsmanship 
which Dad believes is of utmost im- 
portance. Matt also takes his son with 
him when he broadcasts a ball game if 
he doesn't believe the game will run too 
late, because, of course, school work 
must come before play. 

Matt is a living example of a true 
sportsman who can never say die. In 
spite of his serious accident which pro- 
hibits his active participation in sports, 
he still maintains an active interest in 
all sports and will always do what he 
can to further the goal of the various 
sport organizations to which he be- 
longs, and to encourage youngsters to 
play "good" ball. 




10 



Coming Next Month 




Television's sharp-tongued Eloise does a 
surprising turnabout. 



The song we're singing for Septem- 
ber is a merry one — and why not what 
with all the exciting features lined up 
for next month's issue? One of the 
most exciting is Eloise McElhone's 
own story on why she turned from 
man-hater to matron. The solution is 
simple, according to Eloise — all you 
have to do is choose a dreamy guy. 
And that's exactly what she did. Eloise 
will tell you all about it in September's 
Radio Television Mirror, on sale at 
the newsstands Friday, August 10. 
Looking at matrimony from an entire- 
ly different viewpoint is hickory widow, 
Mrs. Al Heifer, who certainly doesn't 
deny that Mr. H. is a dream guy. But 
she has plenty more to say about life 
with Mutual's bigtime baseball broad- 
caster. Mrs. H., you may remember, 
used to be known as Romona when she 

was with Paul Whiteman's band. 

* * * 

Is it fifteen years since Pepper 
Young's family first took to the air? 
It certainly is, and Radio Television 
Mirror is celebrating Pepper's radio 
milestone with a special six-page sec- 
tion devoted to the history of this 
long-loved daytime serial. You'll find 
color portraits of the Young family 
and a fascinating album of through- 
the-years pictures. Speaking of pic- 
tures, don't miss the ones of Dave Gar- 
roway and his "Dial" gang. They're 
all there— Connie Russell, Jack Has- 
kell, Art Van Damme, Charlie An- 
drews, etc. And speaking of special 
sections, be sure to see the Fun Round- 
up feature — you'll find a collection of 
games and quizzes from all the best 
radio and TV panel and participation 
shows. Try some of the 'specially 

picked stunts at your next party. 

* * * 

Art Linkletter's Nonsense and Some- 
Sense, daytime fashions, Who's Who 
In TV and all the regulars, including 
the second in the new solve-it-yourself 
Mystery Mirror series, will be in Sep- 
tember's issue, too. Remember August 
10 — that's when you can buy Septem- 
ber's Radio Television Mirror. 



cSw/hm, surer protection 
for your marriage hygiene problem 




1. ANTISEPTIC (Protection from germs) 

Norforms are now safer and surer than ever! A highly perfected new formula 
actually combats germs right in the vaginal tract. The exclusive new base 
melts at body temperature, forming a powerful, protective film that 
permits effective and long-lasting action. Will not harm delicate tissues. 

2. DEODORANT (Protection from odor) 

Norforms were tested in a hospital clinic and 
found to be more effective than anything it 
had ever used. Norforms are powerfully 
deodorant — they eliminate (rather than cover 
up) unpleasant or embarrassing odors, and 
yet they have no "medicine" or "disinfectant" 
odor themselves. 



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Beauty 
through bows 





Duet of velvet bows: For that 
special touch, Faye Emerson takes 
two of her tiniest bows and sets them 
snugly at the side of her chignon. 



Back interest bow: A summertime 
specialty — to be cool and chic at 
the same time, Faye uses one huge 
black velvet bow in place of a hat. 
Side clasp bows: At right, Faye 
models two large bows on each side 
of her fashion-right chignon. Note 
unusual placement along the side. 




RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR *0R BETTER LIVING 



K 






Vivacious Faye Emerson seems to have 
that certain flair for setting styles. 
She's the gal who first popularized the 
chignon coiffure. All Faye had to do was 
to explain to the viewers of her CBS eve- 
ning television show that the puffy chignon 
she wears is not her own hair. "When I 
want to change my hairdo," confided Faye, 
"all I have to do is take off my chignon." 
That statement helped to start a fad, prac- 
tically overnight, and the demand for hair- 
pieces was on. Every woman loves to 
change her hairstyle and the chignon is 
the quickest and easiest way to effect a 
new style. 

Now glamorous Faye has another beau- 
ty secret to share with you. She predicts 
that bows are definitely top beauty news 
this summer. Leading hairstylists are al- 
ready creating coiffures especially for 
them. Bows of all sizes are being used, 
varying in size from tiny "kiss" bows to 
large "hug" bows. They help you to create 
whatever impression you desire on that 
extra-impressionable man — cute, sophisti- 
cated, or merely well-groomed. 

The chic chignon, because of its sleek 
simplicity, is ideal for dressing up with 
gaily-colored or dark, contrasting bows. 
Faye has a selection of many bows in dif- 
ferent colors, sizes and fabrics, and wears 
them in place of a hat in the summer. 
Sometimes she adds an eye-piece veil 
trimmed with matching bows. 

"The most important beauty advice I 
can give you is to call attention to your 
hair with every trick in the book," says 
Faye. "All smart girls know that nothing 
is lovelier than clean, neat hair, groomed 
to perfection in a flattering style. One of 
the first things a man notices about a 
woman is her hair. That's why it pays to 
take special pains. You know what that 
means; a weekly shampoo and set, daily 
brushing, a good cold wave permanent 
that holds a loose, natural-looking wave, 
plus a touch of lacquer to keep stray hairs 
in place, and brilliantine or a hairdressing 
to add luster. Then you are ready to high- 
light your hair with an attention-getting 
bow that will be both a beauty and fashion 
accessory." 

Faye Emerson posed for these pictures 
so that you could get a close-up view of 
some of the various ways of wearing bows. 
But there is no limit to the variety of 
effects you can achieve with a little experi- 
mentation — and imagination. 




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Dr. Henry Link speaks to Terry about the insecurity brought on by modern society. 



Security 
begins 



at h 



ome 



BY TERRY BURTON 



• A recent Family Counselor was the 
psychologist Dr. Henry C. Link. Dr. 
Link has been worried about the sense of 
insecurity among the people of America 
and has recently written the best-selling 
"The Way to Security." 

Dr. Link defined "security" for us, by 
saying that it is a set of principles or 
standards that a person clings to. "The 
trouble today," he said, "is that too many 
of us have become unfastened from these 
principles, and that's the reason we have 
investigations like the Kefauver one and 
basketball scandals. We've been putting 



too much stress on social security and 
dollar security and not enough on per- 
sonal and spiritual security." 

Dr. Link went on to say that social 
security is what a government does for its 
citizens or what a family does for its chil- 
dren. When a family gives a regular un- 
earned allowance to a child, that's a kind 
of social security. Spending that allow- 
ance is supposed to teach the child the 
value of money, but it doesn't. When a 
youngster has to work for his allowance, 
then he is learning. He is developing skills 
which make for personal security. 

When I asked Dr. Link whether he 
thought that parents today tend to give 
their children too much, he said, "Defin- 
itely, yes. Parents feel that because they 
had nothing when they were children that 
they should give their children all the 
luxuries they were unable to have. By 
doing this, parents tend to make the young- 
sters dependent and insecure." 

Dr. Link's parting words are an exam- 
ple of basic belief: "We have trusted too 
long in the dollar instead of in God. The 
most interesting thing to me about mod- 
ern psychology is that it shows that per- 
sonality and character depend on the 
Commandments and God's moral laws. 
The insecurities of war, crime, gambling, 
divorce, high prices, personal difficulties, 
can only be met with spiritual weapons." 

Wednesday is Family Counselor Day on the 
Second Mr. Burton, heard Monday through 
Friday at 2 P.M. EDT, over the Columbia 
Broadcasting System. Sponsor: General Foods. 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR MOK BETTER LIVING 



F. 






14 



Is it wise for a man to 
fall in love with a woman 
much younger than he ? 




Dr. Jim Brent is heard 
on Road of Life, Mon- 
day through Friday at 
3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 
Sponsor : P&G's Crisco. 



Here are the names of 
those who wrote the best 
letters of advice to Dr. 
Jim Brent in May's day- 
time radio drama problem. 



In May Radio Television Mir- 
ror reader-listeners were told Dr. 
Jim Brent's story and asked if it is 
wise for a man to fall in love with a 
woman much younger than he. The 
editors of Radio Television Mirror 
have chosen the best letters and 
checks have been sent to the follow- 
ing: 

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS to 
Mrs. Myrtle Lewis, Winston- 
Salem. North Carolina for the 
following letter: 

In rare cases, yes. Age, in years, 
is not always the determining factor 
in one's mental and emotional make- 
up. In some individuals youth or 
age is innate so that they are at- 
tracted to younger or older com- 
panions who balance their inner na- 
ture. Environment also plays a 
vital part in age development. 

In my opinion, Jim's age and 
Jocelyn's youth complement each 
other. The fact that Jocelyn was 
denied a normal youth would make 
her an eager, responsible mother to 
Jim's child. Take Jocelyn to your 
heart, Jim, for the delightful com- 
panionship you both need on your 
Road of Life. 

FIVE DOLLARS each for the 

five next-best letters in answer 

to the problem has been sent to : 

Mrs. Lillian Adele Ball 

Arlington, Texas 

Mrs. Arlen Arveson 
Goodridge, Minnesota 

Mrs. Harry Farlow 
Newington, Conn. 

Mrs. Robert F. Everest 
W. Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Betty Toles 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Does jour daughter ha\/e truths she can trust about 




Modern mothers will make sure their daughters have the 
latest scientific information on this intimate subject* • < 



When your grown daughter wants to 
know more about.the intimate facts of 
life — what a relief it must be to know 
that you can give her the most modern 
scientific knowledge because you, your- 
self, have kept up to date. 

You certainly will tell her how impor- 
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syringe for complete hygiene (including 
internal feminine cleanliness) — you will 
explain how no other type liquid anti- 
septic-germicide for the douche of all 
those tested is so powerful yet safe 
to tissues as zonite. 

Your daughter will appreciate know- 
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health, daintiness, and always after her 
periods. She will welcome the warning 
about a womanly offense graver than 
bad breath or body odor — an odor she 
seldom detects herself but is so apparent 
to others. And she will thank her mod- 
ern mother for explaining about zonite. 

The ZONITE Principle Developed by 
a Famous Surgeon and Scientist 

The zonite principle was the first in the 



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16 





Gee, when I first saw you walk in 
I was sure you were Alan Ladd! 



You wouldn't mind autographing 
a diaper for my baby, would you? 




How do you feel about disc 
jockeys who play your records? 



Well, what do you think of those 
who don't play your records? 




Can you tell us briefly the differ- 
ence between jazz and bebop? 



Oh, just one last thing — may I 
have your autograph, Mr. Dorsey? 



I 



bandleader 



• Hordes of fans descend on Ralph 
Flanagan wherever he goes. George 
Simon, editor of the dance band mu- 
sicians' magazine, Metronome, caught 
these candid shots of Ralph as he tried 
to answer some of the questions which 
were shot at him. Simon put these pic- 
tures, as well as many others, in a 
book called "The Bandleader." With a 
face like Ralph's who needs words to 
answer questions? 

Ralph Flanagan's Let's Go Show is on ABC 
Mondays at 10:00 P.M. EDT under the joint 
sponsorship of the Army and the Air Force. 






AVA GARDNER, CO-STARRING IN METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER'S "SHOW BOAT" 





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For half an hour every Thursday night on 
Father Knoius Best, Norma Jean Nilsson 
(left) and Rhoda Williams are sisters 



Tather's 
children 



The two daughters of the Anderson 
Family on NBC's Father Knows Best, 
both began their professional acting ca- 
reers almost in infancy. 

Norma Jean Nilsson, who portrays 
Kathy, first stepped before the micro- 
phone as a sophisticated three-year-old. 
During the war she furthered her show 
business career by playing Army camps 
around the country. She has had so many 
radio roles that she is a charter member 
of the Five Hundred Club, an organization 
of children who have appeared on five 
hundred or more radio broadcasts. One 
of her favorite and most challenging radio 
appearances was on the Bob Hope Show. 

Today, a pretty, hazel-eyed twelve-year- 
old, she attends junior high school in 
Hollywood. Living in Los Angeles all 
her life, she has become a good swimmer 
and is fond of the latest craze of roller- 
skating. Her main hobby, however, is 
coin collecting. Besides radio work, she 
has also been seen on television and 
appeared in several movies. 

Rhoda Williams, who plays the part of 
Betty on the show, had a slightly later 
start in radio than Norma Jean did. She 
was already five years old before she made 
her first appearance. Born in Galveston, 
Texas, in 1930, she moved with her family 
to California when she was three. There 
she did her first microphone stint on the 
Kraft Music Hall, and liked it so well that 
she has been in radio ever since. 

After graduating from Hollywood High 
School at the astonishing age of four- 
teen she continued her studies at the 
University of California, where she re- 
ceived a degree in theatre arts. Rhoda 
has also appeared in a number of motion 
pictures, one of the most recent being 
"Mr. Belvedere Goes to College." 






POETRY 



THE TINKER MAN 

The day was June and the sun was high 
When the roving tinker man came by 
With a Gaelic tune and merry eye, 
The laughing tinker man. 

I set the kettle and took the broom, 
I brewed the tea and swept the room 
The tinker sang in the twilight gloom, 
The singing tinker man. 

He mended kettle, he mended pan, 
He said beware of a tall, dark man, 
Then he drove away in his gypsy van, 
The roving tinker man. 

When cows bed down by the pasture bars 
And soft winds talk in the oak tree spars, 
Then I dream of a road beneath the stars 
And a lonely tinker man. 

— Alma Robison Higbee 



FISHING VILLAGE 

Picturesque shanties, sprawling awry, 
Cocking jaunty roofs at an aching blue 

sky, 
Disorderly rows of mis-shapen piles 
And deep water chuckling through their 

shadowy aisles. 

Lobster traps bleaching in monstrous 

heaps 
Fantastic chrysalids of the silent deep, 
Fishing nets swaying with subtle grace 
Like languorous houris suspended in 

space. 

Red and white fish boats alive on the 

swell 
To th» rise of the buoy and the sound of 

its bell, 
Myriads of seagulls shrieking with glee 
At the splash of an entrail into the sea. 

Hip-booted fisherman ladling catches 
To glittering tubs from slithering 

hatches, 
Ripples and sunlight and seaweed and 

sand 
Vnd just a hint of the peace of the 
promised land! 

— John Mantley 



SUMMER'S LASS 

With wanton eyes 'twixt narrow 

streets 
She fled with sheer delight, 
And though destruction followed 

close 
She laughed with all her might. 
She waved at every passerby 
And shrieked a frantic plea 
For age had slowed a sprightly step 
She hoped they would not see 
The faded braids and shabby robe 
Of which she once was proud, 
And since the leaves were drifting 
They soon would be her shroud, 
And summer's lass just hung her head 
Retreating from the crowd. 

— Hazel Boyett 

DEAD END 

old stories are scribbled on 

the walk of the one-sided street 

in the tread of listless feet 

headed for the bank of the Hudson. 

old dreams are smothered 

in the cracks of the walk 

buried and long-forgotten by arid hearts. 

I walked on the one-sided street 
and heard a bird singing . . . 

— Aline Musyl Marks 

PATTERNS 

The pattern of her life is fixed; 
She finds escape in scores of rules. 
The pattern of her life is fixed 
With no remembrance intermixed 
Of times now passed. These are 

her tools 
To shut out thoughts and ridicules; 
The pattern of her life is fixed. 

— Jeannette Gould Maino 

SUSPICIOUS 

I cut my hair with bangs and now 
I'm not too sure I like them. 
Folks say, "You look lots younger, dear!" 
Just why should that thought strike 'em? 
— Norah Berford Morgan 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR WILL PAY FIVE DOLLARS 
FOR NOVEMBER POETRY 

A maximum of three original poems in each of the following four 
categories: Love and Romance, Philosophical Poetry, Children's 
Verse (state your age) and Humorous Verse will be purchased. Limit 
your poems to sixteen lines. No poetry will be returned, nor will 
the editors enter into correspondence concerning it. Poetry for the 
November issue must be submitted between July 10 and August 10, 
1951, and accompanied by this notice. If you have not been notified of 
purchase by September 10, you may feel free to submit it to other 
publications. Poetry for this issue should be addressed to: Novem- 
ber Poetry, Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42 Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 




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bl 



• "They call me the Human Alarm 
Clock, Jr.," says John A. Gambling, 
twenty-one-year-old son of WOR's 
veteran waker-upper John B. "But 
if the truth be known, for many of 
the twenty-six years my father's been 
doing the sunrise stint on WOR wak- 
ing up New Yorkers, I was the one 
who woke him up to go to work!" 

The reason WOR listeners reier 
to the youth as "the junior alarm 
clock" is that while John B. Gam- 
bling is on his month's summer va- 
cation, his son has taken over the 6 
to 7 A.M. Rambling with Gambling 
show. 

Young John, however, is no stran- 
ger to the faithful and large Gam- 
bling audience. Ever since February 
5, 1930, when John A. made his first 
sound in this world, the WOR fam- 
ily of listeners have been given daily 
progress reports on the youth's 
growth to manhood. And John A. is 
no stranger as a radio performer, 
either, having made his first appear- 
ance on his father's morning show at 
the age of three. He has subsequent- 
ly appeared every Christmas Eve for 
the past ten years on his father's 
show reciting "The Night Before 
Christmas." 

Gambling Junior attended the fa- 
mous Horace Mann Preparatory 
School for Boys in New York City 
where he was a star halfback on the 
varsity football team. Entering Dart- 
mouth College in the fall of 1947, he 
soon became an announcer on the 
undergraduate radio station, WDBS. 
He became station manager of 
WDBS in his senior year, was 
elected a member of the Undergrad- 
uate Council, and graduated this 
June with a Bachelor of Arts Degree 
in English Drama. 

But the younger Gambling did not 
confine his broadcasting activities 
during his college years solely to the 
campus. On summer vacations he 
got jobs in New Hampshire as re- 




placement announcer at WKBR, 
Manchester, and at WTSV, Clare- 
mont. And during his senior year in 
college, young John got his real bap- 
tism by fire for early morning radio 
broadcasting when he landed a full- 
time job from 7 to 9 A.M. as disc 
jockey for the local station in Han- 
over, WTSL. 

John is married to Sally Loppack- 
er Gambling of Glen Ridge, New 
Jersey. The younger Gamblings 
have lived in Hanover since July, 
1950. John's hobbies are sailing his 
sixteen-foot "Comet" Class sailboat, 
building model railroads, and ama- 
teur photography. 

And following in the true Gam- 
bling tradition, young John A. has a 
little "human alarm clock" of his 
own. This one is just a year old, and 
is named John R. 



The Gamblings — John 
A. and John B. — at 
the WOR mike. 
Young John takes over 
the job of waking up 
sleeping New Yorkers 
while his dad, John B., 
is on vacation. 



R 

M 



20 



> 




Information 



Booth 



Ask your questions — 
we'll try to find the answers 



Who Is Hare? 

Dear Editor: 

Could you tell me something about Will 
Hare, an actor on TV? I seem to think 
he went under the name of Oliver Thorn- 
dike some months back. Is this the same 
person? Is he married and where did he 
start his career? 

Miss M. M., Harrison, N. J. 

Will Hare and Oliver Thorndike are 
two different people. Will Hare was born 
in Elkins, West Virginia and attended high 
school in Baltimore. Later, he worked with 
a little theater group, on local radio sta- 
tions and in summer stock. In 1939 he ap- 
peared in Railroads on Parade at the 
World's Fair. His first Broadway perform- 
ance was in "Eternal Light." He is not 
married. 

Lost Tracer 

Dear Editor: 

Please advise why Bennett Kilpack does 
not appear as Mr. Keen on the Tracer of 
Lost Persons. 

M. M., Philadelphia, Penna. 

Bennett Kilpack had to give up his role 
Mr. Keen for reasons of ill health. 

Hit Parade 

Dear Editor: 

What is done with all the gifts Ted 
Mack receives when The Original Amateur 
Hour honors a certain city? To whom do 
they belong now, and are they ever on 
display? 

Miss L. E. M., Mohnton, Penna. 

At present the majority of the gifts re- 
ceived are in a warehouse being cata- 
logued. At some future date they will be 
put in a museum on display for the public, 
but the exhibition will not be ready for 
quite a while. Ted Mack will publicly 
announce the time and place in which 
.they will be shown. 

Dimension X 

, Dear Editor: 

Can you tell me what happened to my 
favorite NBC program, Dimension X? 

R. H. C, Indianapolis, Ind. 



The last broadcast of Dimension X was 
heard on January 29, 1951. Although it 
is off the air now, there is a possibility 
that it may be brought back in the future. 
As yet no definite plans have been made. 

Bill's Other Daughter 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to know who is playing 
Just Plain Bill's daughter, Nancy, now, 
and what happened to the actress who 
played the part for many years. 

Mr. M. S., Chicago, III. 

Toni Darnay is now playing the role of 
Bill's daughter. Ruth Russell, who for- 
merly had the part, had to leave because 
of her health. 

Voice of Your Show 

Dear Editor: 

Could you please give me some infor- 
mation on Jack Russell, the singer on Sid 
Caesar's Show of Shows. He really has a 
beautiful voice and is just perfect for 
television. 

J. R., Manhasset, L. I. 

Jack Russell started his career at the 
age of six in a Florida minstrel show. 
After studying voice for many years he 
finally made Broadway. His first important 
role was as the featured baritone in "Alive 
and Kicking" in 1949. When that musical 
closed, he was signed for Your Show of 
Shows. Now thirty-two, Jack is married 
and has two children. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— I (there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y. We'll answer if we 
can either in Information Booth or by mail 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter along with a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope, and specify whether your ques- 
tion concerns radio or TV. 







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21 



Who's who 



Wendy 
Drew 



Born in the shadows of Hollywood's 
motion picture studios, Wendy Drew 
had to travel three thousand miles 
across the country before receiving 
recognition as one of the outstanding 
young actresses of the day. Wendy 
wanted to give up California and try 
her luck on Broadway, 
but her family felt that 
at thirteen she wasn't 
quite old enough to live 
alone in New York. In- 
stead she turned to the Air Force, 
and at fifteen became a member of the 
Special Service Department, helping 
to put on shows. 

Wendy finally made Broadway, but 
after a grand whirl found herself 
without a job. To help make ends 
meet she became a cigarette girl and 
turned to modeling. At the ripe old 
age of nineteen Wendy entered tele- 
vision, forgetting half of her two-line 
part on her first show. It wasn't until 
she auditioned for a part on Lux 
Video Theater and left the directors 
weeping with her big scene that she 
really got a break. Although she is 
now recognized as one of the leading 
ingenues on TV, Wendy would like 
to give the legitimate theater a try 
next season. 



22 




One of the most arresting facts 
about Arnold Stang is that he is per- 
fectly happy with the role of Gerard 
on NBC's Henry Morgan Show. Un- 
like many actors and comedians who 
have climbed to fame with one 
particular role, Stang isn't afraid of 
becoming "typed." The 
small, economy-size, 
Arnold twenty-eight-year-old 

3MMMI i i i 

** comic, who has been 
likened to a near-sighted 
chipmunk dragged out of the rain, 
has dispensed laughs on shows with 
many top comedians; yet every time 
he appears on a new television show, 
he points out with dismay, both the 
critics and the public "suddenly rec- 
ognize me as 'fresh new talent.' ' 

Stang's career in show business 
began at a radio audition when he 
was eleven. Wearing heavy horn- 
rimmed glasses, and speaking in a 
voice somewhere between a quaver 
and a croak, Arnold began a serious 
recitation for the directors. They 
could not take him seriously. When 
they had recovered from spasms of 
laughter they signed him up on the 
spot for a comic role, a "type" of role 
which Stang has been handling ever 
since. 





Maria Riva, talented daughter 
Marlene Dietrich, came to the United 
States from her native Berlin at the 
age of six. Three years later she was 
seen with her famous actress-mother 
in "The Scarlet Empress," her only 
screen appearance. At fifteen Miss 



Maria 
Riva 



Riva enrolled in the 
Max Reinhardt Academy 
in California, remaining 
there as a teacher after 
her graduation. With 
Jack Geller, she later helped organize 
the now famous Geller 's Workshop, 
and then came to New York to appear 
in "Foolish Notion" on Broadway. 

The blue-eyed, titian-haired actress 
joined the USO in 1944 and trouped 
for six months in Italy and Germany, 
appearing in "The Front Page" be- 
fore she returned to New York to 
resume the private teaching of dra- 
matics. In 1947 she was married to 
William Riva, instructor of scenic 
design at Fordham University where 
she was a summer-session teacher. 
The couple now have two young sons. 
Miss Riva is already committed to 
twenty-eight CBS television appear- 
ances, among them starring roles on 
Studio One, Danger, Suspense, Big 
Town and Crime Photographer. 






Ed McMahon, whose flashing nose 
and lettered wig open each week's 
performance of CBS-TV's gala circus 
review, The Big Top, is no stranger 
to television or circus life. During 
"vacations" from Boston College, Mc- 
Mahon worked as a sound truck an- 
nouncer and barker for 
the "Tunnel of Love" 



Ed 
McMahon 



at an amusement park. 
1 Later he j oined a circus 
to run a bingo game. 
Shortly after this Uncle Sam beck- 
oned and McMahon joined the Naval 
Cadet Corps. After leaving the ser- 
vice he won his B.A. from the Speech 
and Drama School of the Catholic 
University in Washington, D. C. 
Again he put his vacations to good 
use doing everything from dry clean- 
ing to selling gadgets as a pitchm; n. 
After graduation he applied for a 
job at WCAU-TV in Philadelphia. 
He was auditioned, hired and ap- 
peared as co-emcee of a three-hour 
variety show all on the same day. Of 
his five present TV shows he says his 
most enjoyable role is the clown on 
Big Top. "Like every American boy 
I always wanted to run away and join 
the circus. Big Top is a combination 
of two loves— circus and television." 



Delora 
Bueno 



Delora Bueno, a Brazilian beauty 
from Iowa, is currently conducting a 
one-girl television campaign to bring 
the music of Brazil to the people of 
the United States. Ideally suited to 
the task, Delora was born in Iowa 
and reared in Brazil. Living in small 
communities she learned 
the songs that fishermen 
sing and the lovely lul- 
labies of the native 
Brazilians. 

In high school Delora discovered 
that folk music was the same the 
world over, that only the rhythms 
were different. Music became, to her, 
a key for world-wide understanding. 
Coming to New York she studied at 
the Juilliard School of Music and 
found her Brazilian folk songs in 
great demand. After graduation she 
brought her songs to night clubs. 

Television and Delora were made 
for each other. To television Delora 
brings her dark beauty, rich voice 
and unusual songs. To Delora tele- 
vision is the best medium for Inter- 
American understanding. She has 
had her own TV show and was seen 
on Flight To Rhythm over DuMont. 
Since then she has made many radio 
and TV guest appearances. 



Howard 
Barlow 



It is quite fitting that one of the 
outstanding champions of American 
music and musicians should be How- 
ard Barlow. Barlow made his modest 
debut at the age of six at a Sunday 
School social. Several years later he 
started studying piano, cello, trumpet 
and tympany. Although 
the family envisioned a 
business career for the 
lad, young Howard had 
other ideas. 
After studying music at Columbia 
University he turned to choral con- 
ducting and soon directed small in- 
strumental groups to accompany the 
singers. In 1923 he founded the 
American National Orchestra, com- 
posed entirely of American-born mu- 
sicians and featuring American-com- 
posed music. With radio in its in- 
fancy, Barlow was one of the pioneers 
to put classical music on the air, at 
a time when such a move was con- 
sidered impractical. He brought to the 
vast radio audience for the first time 
compositions of native Americans. 
Today, as musical director of NBC- 
TV's Voice of Firestone, he is bring- 
ing the music he has championed to 
television audiences throughout the 
country. 






Talent seems to run in the WGR 
family. Whether you want the best 
in news reporting or the best in 
music, you'll have to go far to beat 
this Buffalo trio. 

WGR Chief Announcer, Allan 
Lewis, is one of Buffalo's leading 
newscasters, best known, perhaps, 
for his daily 6 P.M. and 11 P.M. 
news summaries. Allan's clarity and 
businesslike reporting make news 
items easy to understand, easy to 
remember. As a tribute to his con- 
sistency, it might be mentioned 
that one of his news sponsors has 
been with him for over six years. 
A Detroiter, Allan made a cour- 
ageous switch to radio in 1942, 
leaving behind a successful career 
in the clothing business. The 
gamble paid off for Allan, and for 
news-hungry Buffalonians, too. 



ree 



Th 

from 




For twenty years as Music 
Director of WGR, the only Buffalo 
station maintaining a full-fledged 
orchestra, Dave Cheskin is by far 
the most popular conductor in 
western New York. If there's a big 
function, be it college prom or 
convention ball, the odds are 
Cheskin will be there supplying the 
music. Dave came to WGR from 
Rochester, when he was only six- 
teen and a violin virtuoso. An all- 
high centerfielder in his early days, 
he still maintains a tremendous 
interest in baseball. But music is 
really his first love, as shown by 
his highly-rated shows, heard Mon- 
day through Friday at 6:30 P.M. 



WGR's morning news voice is 
David Getman, who lives up to a 
rugged work schedule six days a 
week. Up at 4 A.M., Dave is at 
the station by 5 :30 each morning to 
"sign on" and begin a series of 
five newscasts: the first at 6 A.M., 
the last at 9:50 A.M. As if these 
rather gruelling hours weren't 
enough work for one man, Dave 
has been studying in his spare time 
at the University of Buffalo, major- 
ing in Political Science. A native 
Buffalonian, Dave is an ardent 
golfer and finds some compensation 
for his odd schedule in the fact that 
his afternoons are free. 



R 

M 



24 
















Burns and Allen Show 

George Burns: The person I get the most 
mail about is Jack Benny. And everybody 
asks the same question — is Jack really 
as stingy as they say on radio? Well I 
just wish you could see the Johnnie 
Walker Black Label he gave me for 
Christmas. How he got it off the bottle 
I'll never know. 

Burns and Allen Show: Alternate Thurs- 
days, 8:30 P.M., EDT, CBS-TV. 

tAte With Luigi 

Luigi: It's funny about sitting in the park 

in America. If a man sits on park bench 

to enjoy the sun, he's called a sun bather. 

But if he sit on that park bench all year, 

he's called a bum. 

Life With Luigi: Tues., 9:00 P.M., EDT, 

CBS. 

Rate Your Mute 

Says emcee Joey Adams: "My grammar 
school teacher used to hit me on the head 
with a ruler. But I got the highest marks 
in the class. They were all on my scalp." 
Rate Your Mate: Sun., 4:00 P.M. EDT, 
CBS. 

Mg Friend Irma 

Jane: Listen to this, sweetie. "Broadway 
producer loses twenty-five thousand dol- 
lar suit." 

Irma: Well, if he paid that much for it, 
he probably has an extra pair of pants. 

My Friend Irma: Mon., 10:00 P.M., EDT, 

CBS. 

You Bet Your Life 

Groucho Marx asked an opera teacher, 
"Suppose I wanted to get up a lady quar- 
tette, could you find me one that sings 
bass?" 

"No, the contralto is as low as a lady 
goes," was the reply. 

After a long, raised-eyebrows-look. 
Grouch remarked, "Obviously, we don't 
know the same kind of ladies." 
You Bet Your Life: Wed., 9:00 P.M.. EDT, 
NBC. 

Vaughn Monroe Show 

Ziggy Talent, comedian-singer on the show, 

defines honor among gagwriters as a steal 

trust. 

Vaughn Monroe Show: Tues., 9:00 P.M., 

EDT, CBS-TV. 

We Take Your Word 

Lyman Bryson: "Social lion" comes from 
the old phrase, calling a person a lion 
if he was a person of great social im- 
portance, somebody that a hostess was 
very likely to go after to get to a party. 

John McCaffery: Why was that kind of a 
person called a lion? 

Lyman Bryson: Well, the lion is the king 
of the beasts, and there's nothing more 
beastly than the average social lion. 

We Take Your Word: Fri., 10:00 P.M., 

EDT, CBS. 

Tulent Scouts 

"Don't get me wrong," says Arthur God- 
frey, "I'm proud to be paying taxes in the 
United States. The only thing is — I could 
be just as proud for half the monev." 
Talent Scouts: Mondays, 8:30 P.M., EDT, 
over CBS and CBS-TV. 



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WAS GRANDPA 




When I was young, grandpa was so embarrassing . . . 

If anyone questioned his pet brands, he'd take it as a 
personal insult. 

Once, when an old crony made some slurring remarks 
about grandpa's favorite brand of pipe tobacco, he 
refused to speak to the man for two years. 

But he was most embarrassing about that car of his. 
He'd bought it back in 1919 .. . and from that day on, he 
took full credit for everything about it. 

Whenever he saw another car of the same make, 
he'd go up to the owner like the fellow was a long-lost 
brother. He'd button-hole perfect strangers, and 
practically kiss 'em! 

To a small boy it was agony . . . could anything be cornier? 
As I grew older, I began to see that having brand 
names you could look for and trust, wasn't a bad idea at that. 



Whenever you buy— 

demand the brand you want 



Maybe it is "corny" to think of familiar brands 
as old friends . . . 

But it's good to know exactly what you're getting. It's 
reassuring to realize that most manufacturers of 
brand name products spend money for research and quality 
control to make their brands live up to their name. 

They know the best way to make money is to 
make friends! 

Every day thousands of these brands are fiercely 
competing for your friendship . . . trying to give you more 
and more value and quality. 

If value, and better products, and better living are 
"corn," let's have more of it. 

As you study the ads in these pages, remember . . . brand 
names are names of friends you can count on! 



INCORPORATED 

A non-profit educational foundation 

37 WEST 57 STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



26 






r 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR, AUGUST 1951 

••• In the Army now, 
Godfrey's young baritone finds 
a soldier's happiness often 
depends on what you can do 



A letter 
from 

Bill 
Lawrence 







Army Hospital 
Fort Dix, New Jersey 
Dear Friends: 

I am writing this to all of you 
who've so kindlv thought of me 
and written CBS and Radio Tet.k- 
vision Mirror for some news. 
Most of you know I'm in the arm\ 
hut there are still many who haven't 
heard that I've been in the hospital 
since the day I was inducted. This 
is a sorry state of affairs and I 
haven't been able to do justice to 
my correspondence, although my 
mother and Janette Davis's sister. 
Carolyn, have tried to answer many 
letters. Rightj*er«vthough. I'd just 
like to writ^jjlBir^ry letter, and 
t mind, pass on a few r 
of advia 
My luck has been bad since 1 was 
a few months ago. The 
ery first day a case of flu sent me 
to a hospital ward. That was fol- 
lowed, by a severe strep throat and 
am now suffering, and I do mean 
jffering. with yellow jaundice. It 
\asn't hurt me to lose thirteen 
pounds but I can think of easier 
\va\s to do it. But the doctors and 
nurses have been swell. That's one 
side of [Continued on page 73] 




■I 



•> 











/ 






She came from Missouri with one shining 

dream — that she exchanged it for another 



has meant more than anything 

else she could have done 



Mary Margaret 
and Eleanor Roose- 
velt have known 
each other since 
FDR was governor 
of New York. 
"She's the world's 
greatest woman," 
says MM. 

Two girls from 
Missouri talk things 
over. Mary Mar- 
garet interviewed 
Margaret Truman 
on TV the night 
her father won the 
1948 nomination 
for President. 

Mary Margaret 
drew almost as 
many people as a 
World Series game 
when her fifteenth 
year on the air was 
celebrated at 
Yankee Stadium 
'in 1949. 



BY JO PEARSON 



28 




The day was like any other. Fifty 
to sixty women, their flowered 
hats bobbing cheerfully, stood in 
the hallway which led to the studio. 
Waiting at the entrance, as is her 
pre-broadcast custom, was Mary Mar- 
garet McBride, her warm handshake 
extended to them one by one. Then 
out of the line tottered a tiny, elderly 
lady in well-brushed black relieved by 
worn but carefully-pressed touches 
which were as white as the neat bun 
visible under her black straw. She 
thrust a tissue-wrapped package into 
Mary Margaret's hands and darted 
away. In the swirl of handshakes and 
greetings, no one noticed that she 
hadn't returned to her place in line. 

The tissue fell away under Mary 
Margaret's round hands to reveal an 
exquisite cut-glass bowl. The note 
attached to it read: 

Dear Miss McBride: 

This is the last of my wedding 

presents and I want you to have 

it. They are taking me away to 

the old people's home today. 

Goodbye, and thank you for the 

many hours of pleasure your 

program has given me. 

"Well, goodness!" said Mary Mar- 
garet. "Where is she? Where is she? 
Stella, please find her!" 

Stella Karn, Mary Margaret's good 
friend, manager, and "no" woman, 
raced to the elevators. No little lady. 
The operator remembered seeing such 
a person going down a few minutes 
before. He sped Stella to the main 
floor. The starter, too, remembered see- 
ing a little old woman hurrying down 
the crowded RCA Building halls. Stella 




T 



ct 



1!l* 





Mary 
Margaret 



Clearly a child 
of the new century, 
tho' born just 
before it opened, 
was Mary Margaret 
at seven months. 

Tommy was 

older but Mary was 
bigger — there were 
no disputes about 
who was boss! 

The curl may have 
belied her brains, 
but no one doubted 
MM was one 
of the University's 
prettiest co-eds. 

Sophisticated New 
Yorker McBride, 
with her earrings 
and Italian stole, 
traveled and wrote 
for the magazines. 





Mary Margaret McBride is heard Mon.- 
Fri., 1-2 P.M. EDT, WJZ, New York; 9:15- 
10:15 A.M. CDT, WGN, Chicago; and on 
the ABC network 2-2:30 P.M. EDT; 1-1:30 
P.M. CDT; 2-2:30 P.M. MDT & PDT. Also 
heard in Honolulu and Alaska; residents of 
these areas can consult local papers for 
correct times. (Participating sponsors.) 



raced up and down the corridors but the 

little woman was not to be found. 

Mary Margaret's disappointment was 
genuine when Stella reported back. She 
is used to such devotion from her listen- 
ers but it never fails to move her. 

"That poor dear woman!" she ex- 
claimed. "She didn't even leave her 
name." 

Most McBride admirers do not prefer 
to remain so anonymous, as Mary Mar- 
garet and her staff, who faithfully 
acknowledge tons of letters and thou- 
sands of gifts annually, well know. 

Since starting on the air in 1934 as 
Martha Deane, Mary Margaret has be- 
come one of the most beloved women in 
America, second alone, perhaps, to 
Eleanor Roosevelt, who is an ardent 
McBride fan as well as a devoted 
McBride friend. Mrs. Roosevelt publicly 
confessed to having been so engrossed 
while listening to Mary Margaret's com- 
mercials when she was a guest on the 
program one day, that she had a hard 
time getting back to the United Nations 
matters they'd been discussing. 

To THE millions of women who drop 
less ponderous problems to listen, 
Mary Margaret's commercials are often 
as fascinating as her daily interviews with 
the world-famous. Listeners are quick 
to sense her belief in a product and 
equally quick to adopt it for their own. 
She is as convincing as the chat across 
a supermarket pushcart or the confi- 
dence exchanged on a back stoop. No 
one doubts for a minute that the rolls 
she extolls aren't the most delectable 
ever baked, that the ice cream doesn't 
have a truer flavor than any other, or 
that the bargains in the chain store 
aren't the most incredible ones in town. 

Part of Mary Margaret's ability to 
convince lies in her own delight in good 
food; the rest in an unshakable belief 
in the simple but seldom adhered to 
adage that honesty is the best policy. 
She accepts no sponsor whose product 
does not pass her rigid standards for 
quality. Knowing this, more than one 
woman believes that if Mary Margaret 
says it, it's so. 

Unlike those of radio row who regard 
sponsors as an evil, no matter how nec- 
essary, Mary Margaret gives as much 
affection and loyalty to her sponsors as 
she receives from her fans. When she 



30 



switched networks last fall, not one of 
her sixteen sponsors considered remain- 
ing behind. Such accord didn't always 
exist between Mary Margaret and the 
people who wanted to buy time on her 
program. In her early days of radio, 
the very idea of a sponsor terrified Mary 
Margaret. She preferred doing and say- 
ing things in her own unorthodox way, 
and she didn't want anyone around 
cramping her style. When sponsors did 
buy time on her show, she was firm in 
keeping them away from the studio. To 
one who insisted on attending a broad- 
cast, she said, "Listen, I'm Irish, and 
when I tell you not to come around, 
don't come around!" It was six years 
and many contracts later before the man 
summoned enough courage to attend a 
Mary Margaret McBride broadcast. 

From the very beginning, Mary Mar- 
garet took the stand that radio is no 
different from newspaper work for a 
reporter — which is what she had been 
and which is what she has remained. 
Few things distress her more than being 
called a commentator. 

"T don't comment," she says with 
-*- good-natured emphasis, "I inter- 
view. And I don't editorialize. I only 
try to tell about the interesting things 
people are doing." 

More often, Mary Margaret manages 
to get her celebrated guests to talk about 
themselves. Rodgers and Hammerstein 
come in to discuss their new musical, 
"The King and I," bringing with them 
its sparkling star, Gertrude Lawrence. 
General Omar Bradley and his wife 
reminisce about Missouri — Mrs. Brad- 
ley and Mary Margaret were childhood 
playmates. The Dionne Quints, on their 
first trip to New York and with just one 
radio show to make, make it with Mary 
Margaret. Betty Smith returns as a 
guest, this time to tell Mary Margaret 
about the musical made from her fa- 
mous book, "A Tree Grows In Brook- 
lyn." The circus doctor from Barnum 
and Bailey's tells about his patients. 
Mary Garden recalls the glory of her 
singing career. 

'There's hardly anyone we haven't 
lad," says Stella Karn. 

A frequent guest before he had his 
>wn program was New York's former 
layor, the late Fiorello H. LaGuardia. 
lis appearances {Continued on page 85) 




Studio audiences 
are always welcomed by 
Mary Margaret. The 
ladies were 
especially delighted 
when guest General 
Bradley received, too. 

Smart in their minks, 
Mary Margaret and 
Stella Karn greeted 
each other after 
Stella's return from 
covering the first 
U. N. Conference. 







I I 



J 



.t\ 




Phil's family 

Sons, daughters, grandchildren— the Regans 
have every good reason to believe 

that more is very much the merrier 



J 



1. Putting Dad to work, the 
girls think, is always a good idea, 
especially at dishwashing time. 

2. But when it comes to tinkering 
with the car, Phil puts the boys to 
work, under his direction, of course! 

3. The Regans: hack row, Joseph, 
wife JoAnn, Phil, Jr., wife 
Loanne; front row Joan, Phil, 
baby Johanna, Mrs. Regan, Mike, 
Bridgid and Marilyn. 

4. Phil was a grandfather at thirty- 
seven. Here he is with Joe's chil- 
dren, Bridgid, 3, and Michael, 7. 



BY FREDDA BALLING 

THE home of Phil and Josephine 
("Jo") Regan is situated on a quiet, 
secluded street in Pasadena, the city 
which is, you will remember, the home 
of the Tournament of Roses and the 
New Year's Day Rose Bowl game. 

Geographically, Pasadena is some 
twenty odd miles from Hollywood via 
the Arroyo Seco Freeway, but emotion- 
ally the cities are poles apart. Hollywood 
is glamour, hotcha, roaring talent, over- 
night success and overnight heartbreak: 
it is the Broadway, plus Coney Island, 
plus Tenth Avenue of the west. 

Pasadena is the Civic Auditorium, the 
Huntington Memorial Library, Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology, tradition, 
pomp, and circumstance. In the jewelry 
trade diamond choker necklaces are 
called "Pasadena dog collars." Pasadena 
is also Going to Church, Maintaining 
Tradition, Clinging to Modesty and 
Sensible Behavior, Revering the Family. 
It is Southampton and Bar Harbor — 
with palm trees. 

The Regan house is — like the ma- 
jority of Pasadena houses- — old, vine- 
grown, shrub-surrounded, and dreaming 
in the sunlight. It rambles. Its 'dobe- 
colored stucco walls are cool in the heat 
of the day and warm in the moonlight. 

Its original (Continued on page 68) 

The Servicemen's Own Show, with Phil 
Regan, is heard Sundays at 5:30 P.M., EDT 
on CBS stations. Sponsored by Pepsi-Cola. 



33 



■ ' 






•-- r 



»»M 







How much 

faith should a woman 

have in her husband ? 



Once a man has made a mistake is he 
forever after unworthy of trust? As Bill leaves, 
Rosemary searches her heart for trie answer 



Heard Monday through 
Friday at 11:45 A.M., 
EDT, CBS network 
stations, Rosemary is 
sponsored by P&G's 
Ivory Snow and Prell. 



"Dill Dawson left Springdale some 
J-* time ago in search of an adver- 
tising career in New York. He soon 
became involved in an affair with 
Blanche Weatherby, daughter of his 
boss. Although Rosemary knew what 
was going on, she kept her knowledge 
to herself for a while. Finally, however, 
the problem was brought out in the 
open between Bill and Rosemary. Bill, 
very much upset, went out for a walk 
in an attempt to get things clear in his 
mind, and was hit by a truck. He was 
badly hurt. It was when he was on the 
road to recovery that he realized that 
he loved Rosemary and must forget 
Blanche. 

Rosemary and Bill returned to 
Springdale and for a while all was well 
with them. But a short time ago Bill, 
quit his job and told Rosemary he was 
going back to New York to make an- 
other attempt to find his life work 
there. He would send for her when he 
had found a job and a place for them 
to live. It was then that the question 
began to torture Rosemary — how far 



could she trust Bill, how much faith 
could she have in him? He had made 
one mistake — would he make another? 
Was it unfair of her to suspect his 
motives. 

From your own experience, from 
that of your friends and family, what 
is your opinion? How much faith 
should a woman have in her husband? 



Radio Television Mirror wilt purchase read- 
ers' answers to the question, "How Much 
Faith Should A Woman Have In Her Hus- 
band?" Writer oj the best answer, in the 
opinion of the editors, will be paid S25.00 : to 
writers of five next-best answers will go 
S5.00 each. 

What is your answer to this problem? Statp 
your views in a letter of no more than one 
hundred words. Address it to Rosemary, c/o 
Radio Television Mirror. 205 East 42nd 
Street, New York 17, N. Y. The editors will 
choose the best letter, basing choice on 
originality and understanding of the prob- 
lem, and will purchase it for $25.00. They 
will purchase five next-best letters at $5.00 
each. No letters will be returned : editors * 
cannot enter into correspondence about them. 
Opinion of the editors will be final. Letters 
should be postmarked no later than August 
1. 1951. and should have this notice attached. 






35 






-^mm. 





"&> 



Heard Monday through 
Friday at 11:45 A.M.. 
EDT, CBS network 
Nations, Rosemary is 
sponsored by P&G's 
Ivory Snoiv and Prell. 



How much 

faith should a woman 

have in her husband ? 



Once a man has made a mistake is he 
forever after unworthy of trust? As Bill leaves, 



Rosemary searches her heart for the answer 



"Dill Dawson left Springdale some 
-L' time ago in search of an adver- 
tising career in New York. He soon 
became involved in an affair with 
Blanche Weatherby, daughter of his 
boss. Although Rosemary knew what 
was going on, she kept her knowledge 
to herself for a while. Finally, however, 
the problem was brought out in the 
open between Bill and Rosemary. Bill, 
very much upset, went out for a walk 
in an attempt to get things clear in hi- 
mind, and was hit by a truck. He was 
badly hurt. It was when he was on the 
road to recovery that he realized that 
he loved Rosemary and must forget 
Blanche. 

Rosemary and Bill returned to 
Springdale and for a while all was well 
with them. But a short time ago Bill, 
quit his job and told Rosemary he wa- 
ging back to New York to make an 
other attempt to find his life work 
there. He would send for her when he 
had found a job and a place for them 
to live. It was then that the question 
began to torture Rosemary— how far 



could she trust Rill, how much fuith 
could she have in him? He had made 
one mistake would he make anothei ? 
Was it unfair of her to BUipecl his 
motives. 

From your own experience, from 
that of your friends and family, whal 
is your opinion? How much faith 
should a woman have in her husband? 



Radio Television MiBRORun'U purchase read 
eri answers to the question "Haw Much 
Faith Should A Woman Have In Hri litis 
band?" Writer of the best answer, in the 
opinion of the editors, will be /<««/ $25.00 to 
writers oj five next-best answers will go 
\;,.nn ,■<„ I, 

What is your answei to tins problem? Stati 
your views in a lettei of no more than oni 
hundred words. Address it to Rosemary, c/o 

Radio Television M on, 205 East 42nd 

Street, New Yorh 17, N, > . The editors will 
choo e the besi letter, basing choice on 

„ri,/ln.ilin ami iirioVi slaniline ol the proli 

lem, ami will purchase it for $25.00 Thej 
will purchase five next-best letters at $5.00 _ 
earh. No letters will !»■ returned; editoi 
cannot entei into correspondence about them, 
Opinion of the editors will be final. Letter* 
should In- postmarked no later than August 
I. 1951, and ibould have this notice attached, 



35 



Does a secretary's viewpoint 

differ from everyone else's? Not in 
this case! Gordie's Girl Friday knows he's as 

terrific as others can only think he is JLWAjr IU^WSiSi 




36 



"The whole MacRae family is in the terrific 
class anyway," says Betty Cooley, meaning Sheila, 

Meredith Lynn, Heather Allison, Gar — and Gordon, of course 



M 










\ 






BY BETTY COOLEY 

A SECRETARY looking at her boss — any secretary, 
that is, not just me looking at. Gordon MacRae 
— gets a pretty good, honest picture of the man 
she works for. A better all-around picture than, say, 
his wife — who's pretty much predisposed to see only 
the good in him or she wouldn't have fallen in love 
and married him. Better than his mother, who per- 
haps still thinks of him as her little boy. Better than 
the one-sided picture you get from friends who see 
him only at his best. 

With a calm, dispassionate eye a secretary can view 
her boss, assess his faults and his virtues. Being 
handy with a typewriter, she can put them all down 
on paper. And there, if you want a really well- 
rounded picture of the man, you have it. A well- 



rounded picture but a pleasant one — atter all, if she 
didn't like the guy she'd go off and get herself another 
job, wouldn't she? 

Since October of 1948, when The Railroad Hour 
first went on the air and I first began to work with 
Gordon MacRae, I haven't had the slightest desire to 
go off and get myself another job. So I'm in a pretty 
good position to give you that well-rounded picture 
of a guy who's a very good guy. 

Sometimes your first impressions don't hold up on 
longer acquaintance. My first impressions of Gordie 
were that he was completely down-to-earth, unaffected 
and good-natured. (And awfully handsome, of 
course, but who doesn't (Continued on page 79) 

The Railroad Hour, with Gordon MacRae, is heard Mon., 8 
P.M. EDT, NBC. Sponsor: Association of American Railroads. 







L 









Does a secretary's viewpoint 

differ from everyone else's? Not in 
this case! Gordie's Girl Friday knows he's as 

terrific as others can only think he is JLWljr lUOSSi 





\ W 



"The whole MacRae family is in the terrific 
class anyway," says Betty Cooley, meaning Sheila, 

Meredith Lynn, Heather Allison, Gar—and Gordon, of course 



36 





/ 



MacRae 



BY BETTY COOLEY 

A SECRETARY looking at her boss — any secretary, 
that is, not just me looking at. Gordon MacRae 
—gets a pretty good, honest picture of the man 
she works for. A better all-around picture than, say, 
his wife — who's pretty much predisposed to see only 
the good in him or she wouldn't have fallen in love 
and married him. Better than his mother, who per- 
haps still thinks of him as her little boy. Better than 
the one-sided picture you get from friends who see 
him only at his best. 

With a calm, dispassionate eye a secretary can view 
her boss, assess his faults and his virtues. Being 
handy with a typewriter, she can put them all down 
on paper. And there, if you want a really well- 
rounded picture of the man, you have it. A well- 



rounded picture but a pleasant one — after all, if she 
didn't like the guy she'd go off and get herself another 
job, wouldn't she? 

Since October of 1948, when The Railroad Hour 
first went on the air and I first began to work with 
Gordon MacRae, I haven't had the slightest desire to 
go off and get myself another job. So I'm in a pretty 
good position to give you that well-rounded picture 
of a guy who's a very good guy. 

Sometimes your first impressions don't hold up on 
longer acquaintance. My first impressions of Gordie 
were that he was completely down-to-earth, unaffected 
and good-natured. (And awfully handsome, of 
course, but who doesn't (Continued on page 79) 

The Railroad Hour, wilh Gordon MacRae, is heard Mon., 8 
P.M. EDT, NBC. Sponsor: Association of American Railroads. 





Dick was extremely hand- 
some, dated so much, 
Betty didn't consider him 
good husband -material. 
She relented when he as- 
sured her he'd only been 
shopping for the right 
girl — and the moment he 
saw her he knew that his 
shopping days were over! 



On their wedding day 
Dick and Betty had tea 
with Bride and Groom's 
John Nelson. Now there 
are twosome meals three 
times a day for Betty and 
her husband. Betty's a 
good cook, Dick says. 
She adds, "Maybe he's a 
little bit prejudiced?" 




38 




Wmrit it 
a lovely 
wedding ? 



By BETTY BAKER 



If you watch Bride and Groom, you'll remember the 
day that "Mrs" was added to Betty's name 




Golf, Dick's favorite sport, 
is now Betty's. Dick and 
Betty were married on 
Bride and Groom, seen 
3:15 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV, 
Tu. & Th. Sponsor Th.: 
Hudson Pulp and Paper. 



Isn't that a pretty name . . . Betty Baker? Mrs. Betty Baker, if you 
please. I'm so proud of it. 

Of course, I haven't been Betty Baker very long; only since last March 
20th. Before that I was Betty Mitchell. Miss Betty Mitchell. I acquired 
the Baker name along with Dick, my wonderful husband. Lots of you 
know how handsome he is, too, because- you saw him at our wedding. 
Bemember? It was on the Bride and Groom television program. And 
wasn't it a lovely wedding? 

I know you'll forgive me if I dwell on how handsome Dick is. Actually, 
it was his good looks that almost kept me from becoming his wife. I 
thought he was conceited when I first met him — which h« wasn't — and 
I also thought he was a playboy — which he was. It seemed as though 
he never dated the same girl twice. Dick says that's because he always 
felt that when the right girl came along he'd know her immediately, and 
he was always looking for that girl. 

The very first time I met him, Dick said to me: "Betty, I've always 
known that when I met the girl I was going to marry I'd recognize her. 
And you're the girl." Of course, I thought that was just a "line"; I 
had figured him as a wolf! 

Ours was a stormy romance at first, but once I discovered how wrong 
my appraisal of Dick was, the thunderclouds disappeared and every- 
thing has gone smoothly and happily ever since. 

"We're very lucky in having had the chance to be married on Bride 
and Groom. So many people who attended our wedding through the 
magic of television have written to us, telling us little things that have 
made their own marriages happy and successful over many long years, 
and others have told us about their own romances, which started off 
as stormy as ours and developed into lifelong wedded bliss. Through 
these letters from Bride and Groom viewers (Continued on page 82) 





39 



"I "■ 'l ~l • "IT"' r 



^ 




being a 
person 




THE top interest in my life is the Giants — 
the Giants baseball team. I have a hus- 
band who manages it, a son who sleeps and 
breathes it, a daughter who loves the excitement 
of it, and a television show built around it! 

Come to think of it, perhaps right there I 
have my first tip on developing a personality 
— but I'm getting ahead of myself, for you 
can't very well develop one unless you decide 
first just what the word means. You're not 
born with personality — like Topsy, it just 
grows. It's called by various names, such as 
charm, poise, self-confidence, and it all boils 
down to one fundamental trait: you like peo- 
ple, and people like you. At least, you do and 
they do if you have an interesting, attractive 
personality. 

We all think we like people. But is that 
strictly true? The girl who acts superior to her 
gang at school (that was I to a T) or Mrs. No- 
One-Likes on your block, are cut from the same 
cloth. They say they like people but they don't 
like them well enough to give them a chance to 
be friendly. I know because, very frankly, I've 
been that way myself. I wish I'd been smart 
enough in school to realize that I was only 
cheating myself — only hurting myself. Deep 
down I wanted to be every bit as popular as 
the girl who got asked out every night and I'm 
sure Mrs. No-One-Likes envies Mrs. Popular 
because she's in the thick of her P.T:A. work 
and gets invited to more kaffee-klatsches than 
any woman in the neighborhood. Everyone 
pities Miss Superior in high school and Mrs. 
No-One-Likes, yes, but (Continued on page 84) 

Laraine Day can be seen and heard on The Laraine 
Day Show, 1 P.M. EDT, Saturdays, sponsored by 
Odorono and Cutex, and Daydreaming With Laraine, 
7:15 P.M. Thursdays. Both programs, ABC-TV. 






Most charming 
guest on Laraine' s 
TV program — Dr. 
Mary Sloop, who 
was voted Mother 
Of The Year. 

When she's not 
being Laraine Day 
on TV, she's Mrs. 
Leo Duroeher of 
Park Avenue — and 
the Polo Grounds! 

At the ball , 
park: Michele 
likes crowds and 
excitement, 
Chris just plain 
loves baseball! 

Laraine in her 
Giant-fan role 
tells Monte Irvin, 
Hank Thompson, 
how many hits she 
expects today. 




m 



*%n 






mh- 






i r 




715 PARK AV 





S^rfl^^ 



4 




What 
rhymes 
with 

Tames? 



If there's a man with more mothers than Dennis James, let him 
come forth and make his claim. But Dennis' activities aren't 
all on the distaff side — the ladies' husbands know him for his ringsic 
announcing of the prizefights and the wrestling bouts. 




V 



IF YOU have watched Okay Mother, 
a DuMont daily television pro- 
gram, or listened to the many 
Dennis James television and radio 
assignments, you know what Dennis 
means when he tells you, "My moth- 
er says I was vaccinated with a vic- 
trola needle." He can talk, either in 
prose or poetry, as fast as any record 
can play it. His rhymes are always 
spontaneous, and always fun, espe- 
cially when he plays the Line and 
Rhyme game on Okay Mother. "You 
supply the line and I'll supply the 
rhyme," he announces to the studio 
audience, and they're off. 

Now we are turning the tables 
and asking Dennis to supply the lines 
and let our readers supply the 
rhymes, for prizes of course. (See 
Dennis' lines and details of the con- 
test on the next page.) 



Dennis himself has rhymed as 
many as twenty-five lines on one 
program. People sometimes throw 
him curves, like the word anti- 
disestablishmentarianism, which so 
caught him by surprise at first that 
even he was silent. Then he gave it 
a little thought, came up with the 
rhyme, "prism." A pretty young 
matron recently insisted, "A word 
that sticks me quite a bit is the one 
called hospital," but Dennis was 
equal to that too. "I had a bite but 
it wasn't from a wasp at all," he 
assured her neatly. 

Dennis has talked in spurts of 
verse since he was in grammar 
school. His public rhyming started 
one night when he was announcing 
a wrestling match and there was an 
interlude to be filled with talk. Re- 
ferring to a fighter, Dennis sud- 



Dennis does a turnabout: he supplies the line, you 



42 




Dennis' forays into the audience are ritual on 
Okay Mother, and none would be complete 
without his singling out some mothers for kissing. Hand- 
some Dennis never encounters any objections. 



denly said, "He's out of the ring, but 
he'll be back, and when he does, two 
heads will crack." The crowd 
cheered, and that was all the en- 
couragement he needed. He T s been 
rhyming ever since. 

Here are the six lines for which 
you'll supply rhyming last lines. The 
last word in your line must rhyme 
with the last word in the given line. 
Here's an example: 

My mother tells me to stick to 
my studies, 

But I'd rather play baseball 
with my gang of buddies. 

eeping this in mind, supply a last 
e for each of these six lines: 



Ke 



1. A fancy name for TV is video, 



2. My favorite pastime is the cross- 

word puzzle, 

3. I come from the banks of the 

Mississippi, 

4. Our American rights tvill be in- 

alienable forever, 

5. Wrestling has always been a big 

hit on TV, 

6. A lot of guys on TV are mighty 

suave, 



Youll find a list of prizes in the 
column at the right. And be sure to 
read the rules before sending in your 
entry. 



Rhyme 
Contest 
Rules 

Here are the prizes in the Radio Tele- 
vision Mirror- Dennis James Rhyme 
Contest: 

1st Prize: Tula, famous for its "at 
home" wear, has made a pure silk 
organza peignoir, rainbow-hued and 
a perfect hostess gown for the femi- 
nine woman. (Value: $35.00) 
2nd Prize: A Revlon gift package 
that will take care of your glamour 
from lip to fingertip. Includes Dream 
Eye Make-up Kit, lipsticks, nail pol- 
ish, hand lotion, etc. (Value: $35.00) 

3rd Prize: $15.00 

4th Prize: $10.00 

5th Prizes: $5.00 each to five 5th 

place winners 

Write your rhyme lines on a separate 
piece of paper ; attach to it the coupon 
below, properly filled out, and address 
to Dennis James Rhyme Contest, 
Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 
42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
Entries must be postmarked no later 
than August 1, 1951. Dennis James 
and the editors of Radio Television 
VIirror will be the judges; all de- 
cisions are final. Entries become the 
property of Radio Television Mirror 
and none can be returned. The editors 
cannot enter into correspondence con- 
cerning any entry. Be sure to fill out 
the coupon below. 

Okay Mother with Dennis James, is tele- 
cast M-F, 1 P.M. EDT, DuMont Network. 
Dennis announces the Monday evening 
wrestling houts and the Thursday evening 
boxing for DuMont; also the major prize- 
fights on CBS-TV; The Original Amateur 
Hour, NBC-TV; and Stop the Music. 
ABC-TV. 



YOUR NAME.. 



STREET ADDRESS or P.O. BOX. 



supply the rhyme — and try for an exciting prize! 



CITY STATE 

(We need the following information in case 
you should win 1st or 2nd Prizes: Be sure 
to fill in these blanks) 

Dress size : 

('heck one: 

My coloring is blonde brunette 

auburn 



43 



Bailey's 
barbecue 




44 



1. First — the cos- 
tume: What's a chef 
without an apron? 
Besides, his wife 
gave it to him so he 
had better ivear it! 



2. To build the fire: 
Douse kindling well 
with gasoline, throw 
in a match, and pray 
that the party does 
not end right there. 



3. Breathes there a 
man with soul so 
dead who doesn't 
try to carry all the 
equipment in one 
unmanageable load? 



4. Time out while 
the chef checks the 
cook book. Jack 
never can remember 
-^does salt keep the 
flavor in or let itout? 



Jack Bailey is heard on Queen for a Day, M-F, 11:30 A.M. EDT, MBS, sponsored 
by Old Gold and Kraft Foods; on Comedy of Errors, Sat., 7:30 P.M. EDT, MBS. 



A lesson in the fine 
art of the barbecue by 
Jack Bailey, your 
Queen for a Day emcee 





5. Like a finicky 
old maid trying to 
put a worm on a fish 
hook, the master 
attempts to make the 
spit and steak meet. 



6. Somehow wife, 
Carol, remains un- 
impressed with 
Jack's lecture. Dem- 
onstration ends with 
slightly burnt finger. 



<r 



7. Lovingly, chef 
Bailey prepares to 
carve. Hmm — must 
be a dull knife. 
Doesn't anybody 
sharpenthesethings ? 



-7* 

8. A little well done, 
but wonderful fla- 
vor. Ooops! Oh well 
— the dentist said I 
should have had that 
toothpulled anyhow. 



9. Certainly it's not 
tough. You simply 
can't get into the 
spirit of things if 
you use a knife and 
fork on a good steak. 



10. What a feast! 
Just can't eat anoth- 
er mouthful. Come 
here Chi-Chi! Leave 
it to a dog to know 
a fine piece of meat. 




BY FRANCES KISH 




each 
day 



Sometimes a real life story parallels the most 
exciting fiction on television or radio, and 
in many ways exceeds it in drama, sentiment, 
courage and humor. Such is the story of Susan 
Peters, young motion picture actress who was 
paralyzed from the waist down as the result of 
a hunting accident in January 1945, and who is 
now giving a glowing performance five times a 
week in the daytime serial drama, Miss Susan. 
In a Philadelphia television studio the real life 
Susan sits in a wheelchair and portrays the fic- 
tional Miss Susan Martin, a youthful lawyer who 
had been crippled seven years before in an auto- 
mobile accident in which her parents were killed. 

That much of the script, of course, had to be 
planned. It was obvious that the girl Susan Peters 
played would have to be in a wheelchair, because 
Susan is. But the show's writer had no idea when 
it was decided to make Susan Martin a lawyer 
that the real Susan was planning to take a law 
course. Planning it so definitely that "I'm saving 
my money like mad so I can go to school and 
I'm already studying by myself," she tells you. 

Her interest in law began when she helped 
another paraplegic prepare for his legal examina- 
tions and then took an aptitude test herself. "I 
got a rating of 97, and was told by the examiner, 
'You're in the wrong business. You have the 
mind of a lawyer and business woman.' I hope 
some day to be both," she adds. 

Successfully playing Miss Susan would appear 
to be the right business for Susan Peters right 
now if the fan mail is any indication. And 
"right now" is the only time that mat- 
ters, in her philosophy. "I live 
each day as it comes," she 
says, and as her gray 
eyes look straight 
into yours 
you know 
these aren't 
empty words. 
"I think I al- 
ways did, even 
before my ac- 
cident. I learned 
that from my 
grandmother, a 
Frenchwoman of 
such strength of 
character and orig- 
inality of mind that 
( Cont'd on page 70 



Miss Susan, 

with Susan 
Peters, is telecast 
M-F, 3 P.M. 
EDT, NBC-TV. 
Sponsor: Col- 
gate-Palmolive- 
Peet Company. 



46 




I 



How to be a hostess 




When someone compliments you, 
don't apologize," says Doro- 
thy. "Yon insult your guest's 
taste when you point out something 
that's wrong in face of a sincere com- 
pliment." Dorothy's work on the loom 
is toward a huge hook rug. 



M" 



rs. roosevelt was Dorothy's 
idea of a perfect guest. "She 
found each person she talked 
to stimulating. She was poised before 
the cameras, and she didn't feel that 
she had to arrive fashionably late — in 
fact, she was a half hour early!" 




• Little more than three years ago I found myself in front of a television camera for the first 

time, introducing Joan Blondell to an audience of hundreds of you critical viewers. 

Suddenly my knees turned to jelly, as I thought, "Dorothy, your manners are showing." Hardly 

had the camera been capped on that initial program than the telephone rang and a polite 

but puzzled woman was proving my worst fears were justified. 

"Why didn't you show your guest to the door when you said goodbye?" she inquired. Ashamed 
of the fact that in working out the program I hadn't thought about the rudeness of such an omission, I 
stuttered through an excuse, mentally making a note that this would never again 
happen on my program. 

The next day, I followed my listener's advice and the results were {Continued on page 74) 



48 



r 



Vanity Fair's Dorothy Doan 
finds that being a good and 
gracious hostess is easily 
accomplished. Her four rules can add 
up to happy guests for anyone 



Dorothy doan daily invites from 
two to five famous persons into 
her living room, located at CBS 
where Vanity Fair is telecast Mon., 
Wed. and Fri. at 2:45 P.M. EDT. 
Dorothy's own graciousness is more 
than enough endorsement for her advice. 





BY DOROTHY DOAN 



When your husband's boss comes 
to dinner," says Dorothy, "do 
invite people whom you know 
he'll find interesting." Dorothy finds 
the rules she follows on TV are equally' 
applicable to home. Husband Richard 
is a TV executive. 




Sally victor, above left, brought 
along some of her millinery cre- 
ations to be modeled on the day 
that she was a guest on Vanity Fair. 
Dorothy's variety in guests is infinites- 
she's had everyone from Dali to Dewey 
appearing on her program. 




GILBERT PHILLIPS, left, 
manager of the AAAV 
New York Travel De- 
partment, gave tips on vacation 
auto travel, outlining routes 
and giving sound advice for 
comfortable and scenic trips. 



X - 






* 



49 



Ellen's love and courage 

are sorely tested in 

this episode from the life of 




Brown 



NOT long ago, at a time when 
Ellen Brown's engagement to 
Dr. Anthony Loring had been broken 
as the result of a misunderstanding, 
Horace Steele, a wealthy widower, 
came to Simpsonville to live. With 
him he brought his daughter Jac- 
queline. And with him, too, he 
brought trouble and anguish for 
Ellen and Anthony. The pictures on 
these pages tell the story of that 
episode in the life of Young Widder 
Brown. 

In these pictures, as on the air, 
the cast of Young Widder Brown: 
Ellen Brown ... Florence Freeman 

Anthony Loring Ned Wever 

Horace Steele Horace Braham 

Jacqueline Steele Elaine Rost 

Lita Haddon Sarah Burton 

Ralph Jordan Lauren Gilbert 



Conceived and produced by Frank and 
Anne Hummert, Young Widder Brown is 
heard Mon.-Fri. at 4:30 P.M. EDT 
over NBC stations; sponsored by Bayer 
Aspirin and Phillips' Milk of Magnesia. 



50 





* 






A 



\~J 



/ 



/ 



New York socialite Lita Haddon calls 
on Ellen, warns that she is going to marry 
Steele — Ellen's friendship with 
him must stop or there'll be trouble! 



M 

Liter's jealousy prompting him, Horace 
comes to ask EUen to marry him. 
Anthony, sensing the reason for the 
visit, leaves with a heavy heart. 



<tw 



PTV£ 



A little later Anthony is called 
to Steele's home — and finds him dead! 
Lita Haddon accuses Anthony of 
murdering Steele in a jealous rage. 



Ellen comforts Steele's daughter but her 
thoughts are with Anthony, who has 
been arrested and faces trial for murder. 
Ellen loves him, will stand by him. 



Talking to D.A. Ralph Jordan they 
know that together they can brave this 
test of courage, confident that 
at the end Anthony will be cleared! 



m 



51 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR'S 



daytime fashions for you 






Paris at a price — isn't that every woman's dream? And isn't it wonderful 
to find that dreams can, do, come true? The designer of the smart cottons seen here went 
to Paris, saw the collections of the great designers, brought home to you 
styles she felt would be wearable, fashion-wise additions to young-American-housewife 
wardrobes. Here are' two of these Paris inspirations, adapted from famous-name designers. 
Biggest, most important news of all, the budget-in-mind 

price tags ! So — the line forms on the left for mid-summer cottons to wear now 
and into fall, dark calico prints equally smart in town or country, 

doubly smart because they have that extra Paris something! In the color picture Elaine Rost, who's heard" 
on Aunt Jenny, models a Dior adaptation. It's a one-piece dress with a 
flattering U-neckline, chicken-leg sleeve, and double-breasted 
with large, important bone buttons. The skirt, softly full; the hip 
pockets, smartly cuffed. There's a self belt but we — and 
you could, too — have added a black patent one. Color combinations are 
black with blue, red or green print. Sizes : 10-18. 
And price? A mere $12.95! On this page Elaine models a Balenciaga 
adaptation. There's up-to-the-minute news in its brief 
jacket with all the flattery of a cape and the practicality of 
a tiny wrap. Under it, a wonderfully draped bodice — strapless, boned at 
the sides — is truly figure flattering, and the skirt is so 
gracefully full! In black, green or brown print, sizes 10-18, priced 
at $14.95. Both dresses by Gracette, at stores on page 83. 
Pretty complements for either dress i complexion-flattering pearls by 
Richelieu, brief gloves, black or white as you choose, by Grandoe. 

Aunt Jenny is heard Monday through Friday, 12:15 P.M. EDT, over CBS stations, sponsored by Lever Bros.' Spry. 





BY NANCY CRAIG 

Radio Television Mirror 
Food Counselor. 
Heard 4 P.M. EDT, 
Mon.-Fri. on WJZ-TV. 



WE ALWAYS serve cream with peaches. Heavy, 
cold and rich. It can be whipped, frozen 
or just plain. But the fruity, sharp-sweet flavor 
of peaches needs this rich touch. My family is 
particularly pleased when I whip cream just thick 
enough so that it pours slowly from the pitcher. 
Try this on a bowl of peaches, sliced and 
sweetened, and garnish with blueberries. 

MOCK PEACH MELBA 
(Makes 6 servings) 
3 fresh peaches % cup heavy cream, 

y<L cup lemon juice chilled 

1 cup water 2 tablespoons confec- 

y% cup sugar doners' sugar 

6 slices plain cake 

Peel peaches, cut in half; remove pits and turn 
in lemon juice to prevent darkening. Combine 
water and sugar. Stir over low heat until sugar 
is dissolved. Bring to a boil. Add peaches, cover 
and simmer only until peaches are tender. Re- 
move peaches from syrup. Allow to cool. Com- 
bine chilled heavy cream with confectioners' 
sugar. Beat until stiff enough to hold its shape. 
Use a pastry tube with a rosette tip to make 
mounds of whipped cream, or shape with two 
teaspoons. Drop onto freezing tray. Place tray 
in freezing compartment of refrigerator. Chill 
until firm. Cut cake slices into 2^2 inch rounds. 
Place in serving dish. Rest a peach half on each 
piece of cake. Just before serving place a 
whipped cream mound in the center of each 
peach. Pour on raspberry melba sauce. 

RASPBERRY MELBA SAUCE 
(Makes 1 cup sauce) 
1 teaspoon cornstarch rant jelly 

1/3 cup sugar % cup fresh raspber- 

3 tablespoons cur- ries, sieved 

Combine cornstarch, sugar, jelly and raspberries 
in saucepan; mix. Cook, stirring constantly, over 
low heat until mixture is thick, about 5 minutes. 
Pour through sieve to remove seeds. Cool. 



. PEACH BETTY 
(Makes 6 servings) 



x /% CU P brown sugar 
% teaspoon salt 
^8 teaspoon nutmeg 

1 tbs. lemon juice 
y± cup water 



3 tablespoons butter, 
melted 
1^2 cups fine bread 
crumbs or graham 
cracker crumbs 



4 fresh peaches, peeled and sliced 

Combine sugar, salt, nutmeg, lemon juice and 
water. Mix butter with crumbs. Grease 6 cus- 
tard cups lightly with butter. Fill with alternate 
layers of crumbs, peaches and sugar mixture. Top 
with crumbs. Bake in 375°F. oven 25 minutes. 

DEEP DISH PEACH PIE 

(Makes about 6 servings) 

% cup sugar 6-8 fresh peaches, peeled 

3 tablespoons flour and sliced 

V4. teaspoon cinnamon 2 tablespoons butter 

2 teaspoons lemon juice 

Combine sugar, flour, cinnamon and lemon juice. 
Sprinkle half of mixture into shallow baking 
dish. Add sliced peaches. Sprinkle remaining 
flour mixture over peaches. Dot top with butter. 
Cover dish with baking sheet. Bake in a hot oven 
(400°F.) 25 minutes. Cool before serving, cover 
with baked pastry wedges. 

(Continued on page 83) 



Veiy 



peachy! 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR XOR BETTER LIVING 



Fo 



55 



A date with Judy 



Pretty Pat Crowley finds 
that playing teen-aged Judy is not 

really acting at all — she just has to 
be herself for Saturday's 

date with the TV camera 





Flopit, who brings acting Crowleys up to 
three, likes to be in on things, especially Pat's phone 
calls. He's his fluffy Maltese self in "Seventeen," 
the B'way musical in which Pat's sister Ann stars. 




Pat memorizes scripts rapidly and works right up to 
bedtime. She loves to tease her sister by reading Ann's scripts 
aloud in a phony British accent. Ann doesn't always think 
it's funny, but then what can you do with a kid sister? 



56 



. 







Pa€s early love was ballet 
and she still practices it about 
the house. Bric-a-brac damage, 
say the Crowleys, is slight. 



ANY similarity between A Date With 
Judy and a day with winsome Pat 
Crowley is purely possible inasmuch as 
this pert just-seventeen brunette lives at 
a lively pace parallel to the impish teen- 
ager she portrays on television. Over a 
double-scooped chocolate chip ice cream 
Pat will tell you breathlessly — and Judy- 
ishly — about her home town of Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, ballet, white rain slickers, 
Earl Wrightson's songs, cashmeres, and 
the works of Thomas Hardy. Another 
scoop and she'll continue on her two 
favorite topics, the success of her older 
sister Ann, and her unbounded delight in 
winning this starring role in ABC-TV's 
sprightly dramatic series. 

Actually, it was sister Ann who led the 
Crowley caravan to New York and thus 
made Pat's career possible. Ann, at 
fifteen, nabbed the ingenue lead in "Okla- 
homa ! " Mrs. Crowley followed to be with 
her and brought along eleven-year-old Pat 
who found the big city quite unappealing 
until she began juvenile modeling and 
was enrolled in Professional Children's 
School. She idolized her sister's stage 
work, and her greatest pleasure was her 
walk-on part in the musical "Carousel" in 
which Ann was featured. 

Producers took notice and soon were 
making calls to the Crowley home for 
both Ann and Pat. Gaining dramatic ex- 
perience touring in "Philadelphia Story," 
Pat returned to play on 
Broadway and now TV. 



A Date With Judy is tele- 
cast Saturdays, 11:30 A.M. 
EDT on ABC-TV. Sponsored 
by McKesson & Robbins, Inc. 




Pat considers blue jeans the 
ivorld's greatest garment, but she's 
not averse to the pretty 
clothes Mrs. Crowley turns out. 





Piano practice for Ann must end when 
Kukla, Fran and Ollie begin, but she's 
enough of a TV fan not to mind. Ann's 
career inspired Pat's; both are viewed with 
quiet pride by Mr. and Mrs. Crowley. 
Left, Pat stops at the hansom 
line-up on the Plaza near Central Park to 
chat with favorite horse, Lucky. 



57 



/ cover 

Times 
Square 



BY JOHNNY WARREN 

played by Harold Huber 

Times Square, New York, N. Y 
. . . the cock-eyed carnival . . 
. . .the million dollar midway . . 
the concrete crater of pandemonia 
Times Square, where something is al 
ways happening, and when it does, I'm 
the boy who's got to know it first . . . 
because when I know it, you know it 
. . . you read my column . . . you see 
it on your ABC-TV screen. You'll find 
action is my by-line . . . such as the 
saga of Big Joe, the man who came 
back. 

I Cover Times Square: Alternate Sat., 12:30 
P.M. EDT, ABC-TV; sponsored by Air- Wick. 





1. Tips move fast along the Main Stem, 
and when Big Joe got out of jail sooner 
than anyone' expected and immediately 
visited the artillery department of a pawn- 
shop, I had it in the 'column but quick. 




2. At the swank Satyr Club manager Mike 
Dato clutched the column ivith a chewed 
manicure. Mike had put the finger on Big 
Joe, then taken over Joe's rackets, I advised 
him not to start any continued stories. 




3. Before the trigger work started, I 
needed Big Joe's story. His daughter 
turned on the tears and refused to believe 
Joe was in danger from his old friend Mike. 
That left just one source of information. 



58 



• '•**^j^ -~M| 


s*s^ 


"^"^ tfife 9k 


p Y il "** tw y~*'- 








Ij-jHi^' 



4. Union Square specializes in free speech, but 
Times Square talk comes just in shades of green. 
A ten spot eased the tonsils of Mousie to confirm 
Mike's boys were looking for Big Joe. Mousie 
spilled they also knew where Joe's daughter was. 




5. When the Pulitzer committee makes an award 
for the hundred yard dash, I'll dust off the mantel. 
I skidded back to the girl's apartment just in time 
to shove her out onto the window ledge before some 
of Mike's hoods broke in to grab her for live bait. 




6. 1 got her in a cab then zoomed back to the Satyr 
in time to see Big Joe saunter right into Dato's 
office to brand him a double-crosser in front of his 
trigger men. He added "Gutless heel" and spun 
contemptuously away. Dato gunned him in the back.. 




7. / caught Joe as he fell. Mike sent his boys for 
the car. Joe slipped his gun to me. Flashing it, / 
backed Dato to the wall and dialed homicide. I told 
Big Joe, dying, that this murder rap on Dato 
squared his old frame-up, but it was the hard way. 




8. Joe's last words were ''Not so hard, Johnny. 
1'see, I got my parole because my heart went bad. 
I only had a month to live." Big Joe paid off in 
spades — with a heart. A big story. They're all big 
stories on my beat because . . . I Cover Times Square. 



59 



Two girls named 



They're also named the "Sleepies," 
for noontime viewing for you means 

the dawns early light for them 






Two girls named Peggy are the two girls named Smith: Peggy 
French of Broadway, and Peggy Ann Garner, 'a Hollytvood 
actress since she was four. Assembled Smith cast, left: George 
Petrie, Reedy Talton, Peggy F., Peggy Ann, Richard Hayes. 




IJps and downs of big city living for small town girls make 
up the antics on Smith. Joseph Buloff, here with Peggy 
Ann and Richard, plays neighbor Mr. Basmany, the jovial 
mountebank whose well-meaning advice often backfires. 



60 



Smith 







Burning magnums of midnight 
oil, the stagehands have to 
dismantle Playhouse sets before 
building ones for Smith. 



PRODUCING a major dramatic show at 
midday is a new and successful con- 
cept in TV, but it involves a pace that 
would stop a clock. The after-hours 
marathon for Two Girls Named Smith 
is just beginning at the time most TView- 
ers are tucking their picture tube to bed. 
On Friday evening at 10:30 the stage 
hand squad descends upon Studio #4 
to strike the set from the preceding 
Pulitzer Prize Playhouse. By midnight 
the stage is bare, and they start setting 
scenery for "Smith." Apdy enough, the 
streets are still dark at 3 A.M. when Dave 
Adler, the lighting man cometh, and 
it's still blackout when the camera crew 
yawn in. The sound technicians arrive 
even before the first milk bottle clinks 
outside on 66th Street. Director Charles 
Dubin checks in at 4:10 when his fellow 
directors are just leaving Lindy's for bed. 
Working regulations are scrupulously 
observed, and at 6:30 the technicians 
knock off for, you should pardon the in- 
digestion, lunch. The cast, with lines 
memorized during the week, are in place 
by 7:30, and before you have sipped 
your second cup of breakfast coffee, final 
rehearsals are in full swing. And the 
"Sleepies" do a wide-awake job. 

These are hours to paralyze seasoned 
troupers, but staff and stars Peggy Ann 
Garner and Peggy French take it right 
in stride, aided and 
abetted by untold gal- 
lons of coffee. 




The couch on stage proves 
irresistible to the horizontal Hayes, 
but Peggy Ann restores order, 
and rehearsal continues. 



Two Gills Named Smith: 
Sat.. 12 Noon EDT, ABC- 
TV. Sponsor: Babbitt. Inc. 





The Sleepies arrive. Peggy Ann has one 
advantage over Peggy F. — husband Richard 
Hayes has to share the same hours. He's 
cast, fittingly enough, as her boy friend. Left, 
Director Dubin calls for a coffee confab 
and script review. Despite gruelling hours 
of preparation, the cast always manages 
a spirited and fresh performance by noon. 



61 




62 



Faith 
Baldwins 

— theatre of 
romance 




Attractive leads on an early 
T of R story were Bill Eythe and Betsy 
Von Furstenburg. Authoress 
Baldwin gives prologue and epilogue 
on each presentation. 



Until they read this, the cast of a 
recent drama on The Faith Baldwin 
Theatre of Romance won't know that their 
script girl was a Radio Television Mirror 
writer getting first-hand knowledge of how 
this polished half-hour dramatic program 
gets on TV every other Saturday. Actual 
camera rehearsals begin on a Friday after- 
noon but by Thursday, the cast is supposed 
to be letter-perfect in their lines. This is 
the day the script girl does her hardest 
work. Actors, concentrating on the role 
itself and deprived of script, frequently 
blow their lines, and it becomes the script 
girl's job to decide whether to sing out the 
forgotten words or to hold her tongue and 
let the actor reach for them. Maybe he 
hasn't forgotten but is timing his speech 
to the emotion he is trying to put across, 
or maybe he prefers to remember by him- 
self and thus impress the elusive line on his 
consciousness. Before the day was over, the 
script girl had developed a kind of sixth 
sense about these things. On Saturday 
morning, telecast day, the script girl calls 
the star and makes certain he'll be on the 
set by 8:30 A.M. He answers sleepily at 
7 and is in the studio by 8:15, fortifying 
himself with black coffee. Costumes and 
accessories have to be checked, too. A 
fabulous fur cape arrives for one of the 
girls to wear in a restaurant scene. A neg- 
ligee has to be hurried to the cleaner be- 
cause there's A spot on it the camera might 
pick up. The sound effects man makes 
ready such details as the chimes of a clock 
or the sound of a popping champagne cork. 
In the last flurry of directions, a voice 
comes over the loudspeaker, calling "two 
minutes," then "one," then "thirty seconds." 

The real star of the 
show, the woman 
whose stories are dram- 
atized bi-weekly, sits at 
a desk and introduces 
her characters to the 
TV audience. Her 
name, of course, is 
Faith Baldwin, well 
known to readers of light romance as the 
author of fifty-five novels and innumerable 
short stories. Miss Baldwin, the mother of 
four children, including twenty-three-year- 
old twins, lives in an enormous Connecticut 
farmhouse whose name derives from her 
own career — Fable Farm. 

Theatre of Romance: alternate Sat., 12:30 P.M. 
EDT, ABC-TV. Sponsor: Maiden Form Brassieres. 



63 



t J& \ 





izardry 
in Sound 

By "Mr. Wizard" 



make a saxophone 
easy, and it'll only 



• How would you like to 
out of a soda straw? It's 
take a couple of minutes. But first let me tell 
you what makes it work. Every sound you hear 
comes from something vibrating — that is, mov- 
ing rapidly back and forth. For instance, when 
you hear the buzzing of a bee you're actually 
hearing the vibrations that are made in the air 
when the bee flaps his wings. You might won- 
der why you can't make a sound the same way, 
simply by flapping your arms up and down. 
The only reason you can't is because you can't 
flap your arms fast enough. You'd have to beat 
your arms up and down about fifty times a 
second before you could make a sound. And 
a bee's wings move much faster than that. To 
take another example,, middle "C" on the piano 
is the sound made by the vibration of a string 
inside the piano. It's been tightened so it vi- 
brates exactly 256 times a second when it's 
struck by the hammer attached to the key. If 
the string were tightened more, so it vibrated- 
faster, the note would be higher. 

All other musical instruments — or any other 
sounds you hear — work the same way. Take 
a saxophone. You blow on the reed which is 
fastened to a mouthpiece on the saxophone. 
This reed starts the air in the saxophone vibra- 
ting and you make different notes by pressing 



tie 



I 



I 

I 



_ 






I I 



I 






re 

"g 
so 

w 

.It 

1- 







Mary Dell Martin's engagement to 
William E. Gill (now in the Army) 
is exciting news to her many friends 
in Michigan and Florida. A beautiful 
diamond shines on Mary's finger — 
stars shine in her eyes. At her wed- 
ding in Grace Episcopal Church, four 
bridesmaids will walk down the aisle 
with Mary — a gloriously happy bride. 




Mary's sunny hair falls in soft waves 
to her shoulders. Her wonderful 
complexion has a satin smoothness. 
A charming smile twinkles in her 
eyes, about her lips. Her face gives 
out a bright picture of her captivat- 
ing Inner Self. You see Mary and you 
know you will like her very much. 




'^ tfa^ tifocji 



A. wonderfully sure, con- 
fident feeling comes to 
you when you know you 
are looking your sweetest 
and prettiest. 
Mary thinks every girl's most important 

beauty asset is sparkling-clean, soft skin. 

"I wouldn't miss my nightly cream-cleans- 

ings with Pond's Cold Cream," she says. 

"It's simply tops for keeping my skin 

smooth and soft." 

Cream-cleansing with Pond's can help 

your skin, too — it's beautifully thorough 

and never drying. Every night (and for day 




Mary Dell Martin — her complexion is 
lovely. "I always use Pond's," she says. 






Mary's Ring 



cleansings) cream your face with Pond's as 
Mary does. This is the way: 
Hot Stimulation — a good hot water splashing. 
Cream Cleanse — swirl Pond's Cold Cream over 

face and throat to soften dirt and make-up, sweep 

them from pore openings. Tissue off. 
Cream Rinse — more Pond's to rinse off last 

traces of dirt, leave skin immaculate. Tissue off. 
Cold Stimulation — a tonic cold water splash. 

Now — doesn't your mirror say happy 
things about your face? It's so alive, rosy ! 
It's not vanity to help your face look 
lovely. When you look your nicest, a 
bright confidence flashes out from the real 
you within — wins others to you on sight! 




GET A BIG JAR 
OF POND'S TODAYI 



Start now to help your face show a lovelier You! 



R 



67 



PHIL'S FAMILY 



(Continued from page 34) exterior archi- 
tecture is Mediterranean; there are grilled 
iron doors opening from the formal entry 
onto a tiled corridor which, dividing like 
a cool, dark stream, flows both to the north 
entrance of the house, and to the drawing 
room (it used to be; it's now a chummy 
living room) at the extreme south end of 
the house. 

Once the visitor has entered the home, 
it is obvious to even the most untrained eye 
that the interior decorating scheme adopted 
by The Regans is pure Happy Family. 

Every room is filled with family memen- 
tos; every room is brightened by objects 
about which there is family history. 

Take the den, for instance — the room 
into which you would be ushered by Phil 
the moment you arrived. 

Probably Phil would be wearing his 
favorite leisure output: a pair of 
brown loafers, a pair of brown gabardine 
slacks, and a bright red shirt. "How about 
this shirt!" he would observe, laughing. "If 
anybody had asked me about my willing- 
ness to wear a red shirt, I would have said, 
'Not unless I was out of my head.' How- 
ever, Jo bought this for me in Palm Springs 
and I certainly enjoy it. Gives me a big lift." 

The den is compact, probably the small- 
est room in the house, but it is obviously 
used, lived in, enjoyed. There is a fireplace 
in which a fire crackles every morning and 
evening, and above the mantel are two 
large framed pictures. One contains Phil's 
engraved invitation to attend the inaugura- 
tion of President Roosevelt in 1937, and it 
is flanked by portraits of Mr. Roosevelt and 
Mr. Garner; the second contains Phil's 
invitation to the 1945 inauguration, flanked 
by portraits of Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. 
Truman. 

To the left of the fireplace is Phil's gun 
collection. Because Phil served with New 
York's police force, he is much interested 
in firearms, particularly any weapon hav- 
ing a history. He likes to tell the story of 
the most interesting guns. For instance, 
there is a specimen with wooden stock and 
short barrel which was manufactured by a 
criminal who ingeniously sawed a .22 rifle 
down to revolver size. Purpose: to make 
use of a loophole in New York law about 
what constituted a murder weapon. The 
result was that the criminal was brought 
to justice and the leaky law mended. 

In this trophy case of the Regans there 
is also a derringer, probably carried by a 
Mississippi River-boat gambler. There 
are pistols from France and Italy. There is 
a lethal fountain pen which seems entirely 
innocent when worn conventionally in a 
gentleman's coat pocket. It fires a .22 slug 
and is final at close quarters. 

Also occupying a conspicuous position in 
the case with the gun collection is a Pepsi- 
cola bottle, half-filled with a dark and evil- 
looking fluid. The appearance is deceptive. 
The bottle contains crude oil, that lovely 
stuff which makes Texas the home of the 
billionaire. Several years ago, a friend of 
Phil's asked him if he would care to invest 
some of his hard-earned show business 
R salary in oil. Being an Irishman, Phil kissed 
M a shamrock and signed a check. 

As a direct result of this action, a series 

of wells were spudded in and Phil became 
68 



one of the stockholders in a highly profit- 
able oil development. Phil regards this with 
the same gratitude he brings to all the good 
things in his life. He says quite simply, 
"God has been very good to us." And so, 
every time a member of the family happens 
to glance into the gun cabinet, he or she 
is reminded of the bounty of earth and the 
goodness of God. 

On the east wall of the den there are 
three large autographed pictures of three 
beautiful women: Joan Crawford, Irene 
Dunne, and Ruby Keeler. The pictures are 
at least ten, perhaps fifteen, years old. 

Phil made a picture with each of the 
actresses and cherishes each as a friend. 

The west wall of the den is as crowded 
with pictures as the walls of the Hollywood 
Brown Derby are. There is a 1938 shot of 
Phil with two senators: Truman of Mis- 
souri and Barkley of Kentucky. Beside it 
is another candid, taken in 1948, showing 
Phil standing between President Truman 
and Vice President Barkley. 

There is a picture of Phil greeting Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Roosevelt on the occasion 
of the 1933 inauguration; one of Phil at 
a table with Edgar Bergen and Jimmie 
Stewart before Bergen became a father and 
Jimmie met Harvey; one of Phil, Mayor 
Kelly of Chicago and other friends; a 
number of pictures taken at different times 
of Phil with one-time Mayor, now Ambassa- 
dor O'Dwyer. 

The dominant picture, the great far- 
reaching picture, shows Phil on the review- 
ing stand in Washington during the 1949 
inauguration, singing "The Star-Spangled 
Banner" while half a million people 
crowded frosty Pennsylvania Avenue and 
listened in patriotic awe. 

In the northeast corner of the den there 
is a small desk at which Josephine Regan 
does her writing and keeps her accounts. 
One of Jo's notable accomplishments is a 
slender volume entitled "A Child's Magic 
Key to Heaven" and is a child's version of 
the ten commandments. 

Originally, Jo formulated this guide for 
her own four children: Phil Regan, Jr. 
(called "Bud" in the family) , Joseph, Mari- 
lyn, and Joan. All four are now grown. Joe 
is married and has three youngsters. 
This array of grandchildren made Phil 
Regan a grandfather at the sprightly age 
of thirty-seven. 

Bud and his wife, Loanne, were married 
on February 13, 1951, in Palm Springs. 
Joan and Marilyn live at home, of 
course; Joe and his family have a house 
only a short distance from the family home ; 
Bud and Loanne are living nearby. 

The result of this integrated family 
situation is that the parental door 
bangs all day and half the night with the 
goings and comings of the clan. Jo never 
knows whether luncheon will be served for 
two or twelve. 

Naturally, this sort of thing takes plan- 
ning. Jo bakes a ham once a week, then 
puts it in the deep freeze. Often she also 
roasts a leg of lamb and a rolled roast of 
beef. For luncheon, these can be sliced in 
amount extensive enough to serve all guests, 
no matter how unexpected. For dinner, 
they can be heated and served as neces- 
sary. At all times, Jo likes to serve a salad 



such as shredded cabbage, apples, an 
pineapple (all ingredients which can be 
kept on hand ready to stretch a menu) and 
she keeps ready-to-bake rolls in the re- 
frigerator, and corn bread mix in the cup- 
board. For dessert, she likes to serve a 
fruit compote or strawberry shortcake. 

All of Jo's planning is done at the desk 
in the den, where she also keeps her house- 
hold accounts, and does her creative writ- 
ing. The desk is also famous for the fact 
that it was here where one of the great 
decisions of the Regan family was made. 

When Phil was invited to leave New York, 
where he had been highly successful in 
show business, and try his luck via screen 
test in Hollywood, he and Jo discussed the 
move far, far into the night. First, they 
analyzed the family bank account: four 
hundred dollars. Then they discussed Phil's 
need (as he had been warned) for an ex- 
tensive wardrobe. He would have to buy 
white tie and tails, black tie and dinner 
jacket; riding clothes, tennis flannels, sev- 
eral standard business suits. 

Jo made a neat list. She arrived at an 
estimated total. She and Phil agreed on a 
plan: they would borrow enough to buy 
the essential wardrobe, and they would 
split the bank account. Phil would take 
two hundred dollars and assault Holly- 
wood. Jo would keep two hundred dollars 
and maintain the family in good condition 
until Phil could send for them. 



As everyone knows, Phil was an 
immediate click. He puts it this 
way, "All I can say is that God was very 
good to us." 

There is one amusing highlight on those 
Hollywood days. When Phil signed his con- 
tract, he did so knowing that there was a 
clause in it which forbade him to marry. 
He appended his signature with a clear 
conscience. He had no intention of marry- 
ing; he was already set for all time and 
eternity. He was already the father of four 
children. 

Studio press agents felt it would be wise 
to conceal this fact, but Phil made no real 
secret of it and all of his friends knew the 
truth. Gradually word leaked out, so one 
enterprising newspaper man approached 
Phil: "I hear that you're married and 
have five children. How about it?" 

"It isn't true," explained Phil. "I have 
only four." 

The newspaper man laughed, fully satis- 
fied with this denial. "Isn't it a kick — the 
way rumors get started?" he observed. He 
printed a denial of Phil's marriage and 
fatherhood, missing. the honesty of Phil's 
statement entirely. 

In addition to the den, the lower floor of 
the Regan house consists of a comfortable 
living room (in which choice specimens of 
Phil's Toby Mug collection are displayed) , 
an airy solarium, a banquet hall of a dining 
room, the usual butler's pantry and farm- 
house kitchen. Also, off the main corridor, 
there is a tiny chapel. 

In this chapel there is room for only a 
small bookcase, an old, well-worn but total- 
ly comfortable armchair, and a prayer 
bench. Around the walls are the fourteen 
stations of the cross, and against the east 
side of the room there is a modest altar. 
Jo spends many hours in this restful sanc- 
tuary, reading, sewing, and meditating. 

Next to the den in usefulness, the most 
lived-in room is the solarium with its split 






bamboo chairs, lounges, and chaises 
longue, with its reed screens, and its bam- 
boo milk bar. Phil and the boys built the 
bar and their stories of its construction are 
hilarious. As you may not know, bamboo 
must be worked while wet. However, it dries 
rapidly with the result that the deliberate 
workman finds himself half-done and sty- 
mied by a length of dry timber. 

Phil soaked the bamboo in the bathtub 
in the service porch bathroom, then trailed 
it through the kitchen, and dining-room be- 
fore using it in the sun porch. Placing the 
bamboo footrail was the final, trickiest 
stunt; just as Phil had it fitted into three 
of the rests extending from the semi-circu- 
lar face of the bar, the bamboo rebelled, 
tossing Phil as if he had been riding a 
broncho. The boys laughed until they cried, 
and Phil hasn't yet lived down his rough- 
riding carpentry. 

There is a great deal of laughter in the 
Regan house, a great deal of conversation, 
and much high planning. There is that rare 
and wonderful thing, a sense of dedication. 
Nowadays, no one can talk to Phil for long 
without getting onto the subject of his radio 
program and what he hopes to accomplish. 

He was semi-retired until last spring 
when Mr. Alfred Steele, president of the 
Pepsi-cola Company and a long-time friend 
of Phil's, accompanied Phil to an Army 
base where Phil had agreed to sing. This 
trip persuaded both men that, once again, 
this country is in a shooting war of des- 
perate proportions. The lethargy of the 
country has astonished Phil. Millions of 
Americans seem oblivious to the fact that 
there are many government hospitals to 
which men are brought direct from Korea, 
blood still fresh on their bandages. 

Phil worked with Roy Topper, a gifted 
writer and ex-newspaperman whose beat 
was Chicago, to perfect a format for the 
show. Roughly it is this: in advance of 
Phil's scheduled show, the men at the base 
to be visited select a man to star on Phil's 
program. This man is given one hundred 
dollars in cash, plus a five hundred dollar 
war bond. In some cases, this recognition 
will eventually pave the way to a career. 

Phil has been astonished at the swift 
appreciation of the program evinced from 
bases throughout America. After hearing 
the first few shows, boosters began to send 
telegrams. A group in one camp wired, "If 
you think that man on your Sunday show 
was a singer, just come up here and listen 
to our boy." An Air Force base announced, 
"No Marine ever sang as good, as high, or 
as loud as a mechanic we have; he's prac- 
ticed against a B-29 warming up." 

After Phil has completed his show 
at a base, he goes to the nearest 
hospital and walks through the wards, 
chatting with the men. In many cases he 
is the first American civilian with whom 
they have come in contact since being 
shipped overseas; Phil tries to bring them 
word of the appreciation extended by all 
freedom-loving people. 

And so that is how the Regans will be 
living when you read this: they will be trav- 
eling by plane, train, and car over fifty 
thousand miles and forty-eight states. When 
that mission is accomplished they will re- 
turn to Pasadena to plan other helpful 
excursions for groups of people in need. 

Because the Regans are grateful to God, 
and they intend to show that gratitude. 








69 



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70 



(Continued from page 46) I have never 
met quite her equal. Ma Mere, as we 
called her, never postponed anything 
pleasant or anything difficult. If the 
day was bright and sunny she would put 
everything aside to take me on some 
jaunt she suddenly decided would please 
me. If she had something hard to face 
she never put it off in the hope it would 
get any easier. When she didn't like the 
way things were, she did her best to 
change them, and refused to worry. 'To- 
morrow,' she would say, 'will take care of 
itself.' " 

There's another parallel in the story of 
Susan Peters and Susan Martin besides 
their interest in law. On television, Susan 
is extremely fond of her brother Sam's 
young stepson, who is played by nine-year- 
old Ralph Robertson. In real life, Susan 
adores five-year-old Timothy Richard 
whom she and her ex-husband Richard 
Quine adopted a year after she was hurt. 
Timmy was ten days old at the time. 

With Timmy, it was quite a household 
that Susan transferred to Philadelphia 
from her pretty house in the San Fernan- 
do Valley section of Hollywood. It includes 
her nurse, Mrs. Stean, who has been with 
her since she got Timmy, and the couple 
who act as her chauffeur and cook. They 
all live in a rented furnished house that 
makes them more than a little homesick 
for their own well-equipped place in Cali- 
fornia. Susan had been offered a choice 
of doing her show from Chicago or Phila- 
delphia and she chose Philadelphia be- 
cause of its nearness to New York and the 
fact that friends could occasionally come 
down for a weekend. Little did she know 
then what a fifteen-minute five-day-a-week 
drama would mean in time and energy 
consumed, and that friends would have to 
be gently asked to "hit the road," as she 
puts it, before too late on Sundays, so that 
their hostess could memorize next day's 
script. 

Susan is up and dressed at 8:30 to have 
breakfast with Timmy before he goes off 
to the Oak Lane Country Day School. By 
10:30 she's on the set, going through the 
first run-through of that day's episode in 
the life of Miss Susan Martin. There's a 
break during the morning for the com- 
mercial run-through, but Susan stays on 



the set and watches everything. She will 
move her chair off to one corner and read 
dialogue with Natalie Priest, who plays 
her companion and confidante, Daisy; or 
with Don Hanmer, who plays her brother 
Sam. She's a perfectionist, and wherever 
there's a bit of dialogue or business that 
needs some extra work she's eager to keep 
at it. She's vitally interested in every- 
body's share in this miracle of getting a 
television show on the air. 

At noon the run-throughs commence 
again, continuing with brief rest periods 
until 2:00 when every line has been pol- 
ished and every scene timed. Dress re- 
hearsal is from 2:05 to 2:20. Then make- 
up. At 3:00 Miss Susan goes on the air, 
at 3:15 the day's story is finished — and at 
4:00 rehearsals for the next day begin. 

At 6:00 Susan gets a thirty-five minute 
cooling drive home through beautiful Fair- 
mount Park, along the quiet Schuylkill 
River (twenty-five minutes, if Susan her- 
self takes the wheel, because she likes to 
move along at the full legal rate of speed, 
and she handles her manually operated 
car with precision and assurance). 

Timmy is waiting for her at home, eager 
to have her share his favorite Western on 
television. Sometimes he lures her out in 
the yard for a fast game of ball — the 
wheelchair doesn't keep Susan from being 
a first-class catcher— before she even has 
time to take off her make-up. After din- 
ner the inevitable script comes out, to be 
memorized for next day's rehearsals. 

Saturday is Timmy's own day. They go 
fishing. They go to the circus or a carni- 
val. They play baseball. Sometimes the 
gang from the studio asks Susan to um- 
pire their games and Timmy helps along. 
They're trying to get permission to use the 
Police Gun Range so Susan can get in 
some target practice, for in spite of the 
fact that she shot herself accidentally 
while out hunting, Susan has no complex 
about guns or shooting and no one has to 
be careful about mentioning either in her 
presence. Quite the contrary — she still 
thinks it's great sport. 

Keeping up with Timmy is an important 
part of Susan's job, because of his alert 
inquiring mind and his capacity for get- 
ting into mischief. 

The gang at the studio hands Susan its 



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highest accolade when they tell you she's 
"a good egg," "a real person," "a girl with 
guts and a fine actress." 

"We • were told she would be close- 
lipped until she got to know us, and that's 
true," one of them told me, "But very 
soon there wasn't a guy in the place who 
wouldn't do anything for her." 

Susan admits she has a temper that she 
has tried very hard to overcome, and she 
must have succeeded because no co-work- 
er mentions it. All they say is that she 
works harder than anyone else and is more 
demanding of herself than she is of others. 

She gets her scripts about two weeks 
ahead, so she knows the story line in ad- 
vance. But she finds television very dif- 
ferent from motion picture routine and a 
great deal more taxing. "On a television 
set you work constantly, whereas on a 
movie set you always have some free time 
between takes. Here I have to be on hand 
all the time the cameramen are working, 
while lights are being adjusted, while 
technical problems of space and move- 
ment are being worked out. In a motion 
picture studio stand-ins do this." 

Susan neither wants nor gets any special 
consideration on the set. Producer-direc- 
tor Ken Buckridge may instruct her, "Re- 
position yourself, Susan, about three steps 
forward," and Susan will touch the wheels 
of her chair and roll it slightly forward. 
When she still doesn't seem to be in quite 
the right spot, no one comes to help her. 
"You'll have to lean back a little, Susan, 
if you stay there," Ken cautions matter-of- 
factly, and Susan decides to lean. 

Susan's ex-husband, Dick Quine, is now 
directing for Columbia Pictures in Holly- 



wood and Susan considers him one of the 
best out there. She and Dick are still very 
good friends, although she divorced him in 
September 1948, after five years of mar- 
riage. Close friends say the divorce was 
entirely her idea and they praise him high- 
ly for his devotion and loyalty. Susan 
doesn't discuss the divorce, but she talks 
about Dick freely, and they have long 
conversations over the long distance tele- 
phone. When she toured as the invalid 
Elizabeth Barrett in "The Barretts of Wim- 
pole Street," Dick rehearsed her before 
she would take it on the road, even though 
it was after the divorce. "I'd rather not 
do anything of any importance without 
Dick's suggestions," she says. 

Movie-goers first took notice of Susan 
when she played in "Random Harvest," 
with Greer Garson and Ronald Colman, 
and was nominated for an Academy 
Award. Her only motion picture since the 
accident was "The Sign of the Ram," in 
which she played a demanding invalid. 

Susan's independence of character is 
no doubt inborn, but certainly was fos- 
tered by that indomitable grandmother 
of hers. For instance, the fact that Susan 
drives so fearlessly now, even though she 
controls the car completely with her two 
hands, probably stems from the time Ma 
Mere taught her to take hold and drive, 
when she was twelve. Ma Mere was almost 
blind at that time but she decided one day 
they would go for a ride, even though the 
chauffeur was off and everyone else was 
away from home. "I'll show you how," 
she told Susan. "There is nothing to be 
afraid of." Carefully she explained which 
pedal to press, which lever to pull, how to 



brake and steer. Somehow they got out 
on the road and went for a short ride and 
got back without incident. 

No car ever held any terrors for Susan 
after that. Her present car has the latest 
improved equipment with automatic drive, 
a hand lever that pushes up for the air- 
brake, down for gas, and flips back and 
forth for dimming and signalling. 

When you ask Susan now, in the light 
of her new experience as a television star, 
what advice she would give to young ac- 
tresses she grows very practical. "I would 
tell them," she says, "that acting requires 
a considerable amount of talent, especially 
for television, and a great deal of work. 
But they should always have some other 
work, too, that they can fall back on if 
success comes too slowly or doesn't last. 
That's why I want to study law and work 
toward a business career. I'm planning to 
adopt a little girl next year so Timmy 
won't grow up an only child, and as time 
goes on there will be so much I want to do 
for my children. 

"Another thing I would like to tell every 
actress, and every young girl for that mat- 
ter, is to develop your capacities and for- 
get your deficiencies. Everyone has some 
handicap, seen or unseen, recognized or 
unrecognized. Never underestimate your- 
self and never underestimate others. We 
can all do more than we dream of. 

"The character I play on television, Miss 
Susan Martin, is warm, sympathetic and 
understanding. I think I'm beginning to 
get inside of her. To make her live, and to 
bring those qualities to the television 
screen, is reward enough. Especially with 
Timmy waiting for me at home." 



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71 




Solve-It- Yourself 

with Charlie Wild. 

Guest Detective 




Charlie Wild was dictating a lit- 
tle essay on murder the day 
Police Sergeant Keough came 
into his office saying he'd been 
suspended from duty on a frame- 
up. Keough claimed he'd caught 
the assailant of a lady in distress 
only to find him badly beaten and 
without the purse the lady said 
he'd stolen. She disappeared, and 
at headquarters, Matejka, the as- 
sailant, charged Keough beat him. 



Keough insists he doesn't know 
Matejka, and Charlie agrees to 
help him. Meanwhile, in another 
part of town, Matejka's name 
means trouble to Jean Bannion 
and disbarred lawyer Andrew 
Voelker whose behind-the-scenes 
help Jean is counting on to free 
her husband, Carl, from a murder 
charge. Matejka demands more 
money for his part in the Keough 
"frame-up," but Voelker balks. 



On her own, Jean decides to see 
Matejka and come to an agree- 
ment. Charlie, there for reasons 
of his own, meets a shaken Jean 
coming out of Matejka's room. 
Charlie finds him dead. The po- 
lice suspect Keough, knowing he 
had it in for Matejka. And Char- 
lie knows it was he who arrested 
Jean's husband in the payroll- 
robbery murder — and that the 
$40,000 payroll was never found. 



R 
M 



72 




Keough visits Charlie again, 
hears the inspector wants to see 
him. "Let him come and get me," 
says Keough, who admits that he 
knows the payroll was never 
found. Later, Charlie waits out- 
side Voelker's apartment for 
Jean. Voelker knows Charlie saw 
Jean leaving Matejka's room, 
warns her Charlie will want 
money for keeping quiet. "Pay off 
Wild and let me take care of you." 



Jean, fearful that Charlie will 
tell, agrees to give him the money 
which, at her husband's advice, 
she had hidden in an accordion 
and put in a pawnshop after the 
robbery. The night before, Keough 
had suddenly warned Charlie to 
drop the case. Disregarding him, 
Charlie meets Jean in the pawn- 
shop. As they are about to retrieve 
the money-stuffed accordion, an 
armed man enters the shop. 



In the struggle that follows, Char- 
lie wrestles with the gunman, a 
person known to both him and 
Jean. Is it Voelker who was mere- 
ly stringing Jean along until she 
revealed the hiding place of the 
money? Or is it Keough who was 
playing a waiting game until the 
Majetka "frame-up" spoiled his 
plans? Solve it yourself, then 
turn to page 96 for an explana- 
tion of "The Air-Tight Frame-up." 









A LETTER FROM BILL LAWRENCE 



(Continued from page 27) the Army 
where you find very few gripes. 

But the crazy part of it all is that I've 
got nothing to talk about but Army hos- 
pitals. I don't even know what branch I'll 
be in. Or even, if I have any more 
hard luck, whether I'll be in the Army by 
the time you read this. But now I'm Pri- 
vate Bill Lawrence, all right. And frankly, 
it was a relief to find out the old Army 
joke about a private having no privacy 
was true. Without the constant companion- 
ship of my Army friends, I'd be feeling 
pretty low. Even in the ward, reveille is 
at seven and lights out at ten. It wouldn't 
be much fun if you had to spend those 
fifteen hours alone. 

Most of the boys I've met are regular. 
Naturally, the most popular GIs are the 
men who are cheerful. I think first of a 
buddy, Joe Jura of Pennsylvania, who once 
was in a sick bed next to me and even now 
comes back to give the boys some laughs. 
Of course, we make our own occasionally. 
If you hear a shriek from the showers, 
you can bet someone has hidden the man's 
clothes. But we spend most of the day 
trying to sleep away the germs and fill 
in odd hours with cards, reading, listening 
to the radio and watching television in our 
ward. Then, of course, there are gab 
sessions. And what do men talk about? 
You guessed it — women! 

Surprisingly, they don't talk about the 
glamour-lovelies. The boys talk about 
their girls back home and, believe me, 
they are really proud of them. Lana 



Turner and Betty Grable may be nice to 
watch on a screen, but when it comes to 
serious interest it's the homespun girl 
who heads the list. And this is where I'm 
going to offer some advice. 

Most of the boys like to hear from home 
about two or three times a week. When 
they don't hear that often, they begin to 
feel a lot more sick than any germ could 
make them. If you could see a soldier drop 
everything when he gets a letter from 
home, reread it a couple of times, you'd 
understand why a letter is so important. 

A cheerful letter really lifts up a GI's 
spirits. After all, the Army isn't exactly 
a picnic and whimpering about civilian 
hardships doesn't set right. Not that a man 
doesn't want to share the responsibility of 
any bad news. It makes him feel good to 
be asked to help with decisions and give 
some advice. So don't get me wrong 
when I say letters should be just cheerful. 
There's a lot of difference between com- 
plaining about the price of sirloin and 
working out a real problem. 

What can you write about? It's simple. 
Just talk about the ordinary, every-day 
things. He wants to know what his friends 
are doing, even if it's the same old thing. 
If they lay some new bricks on Main Street 
or put a fresh coat of paint on the fire- 
house, that's news. He wants to know about 
the books you read and your favorite TV 
and radio programs for chances are he's 
seen them, too, and it gives you something 
in common. If you put a new picture on 
the wall or buy a new dress, describe it. 



Tell him where you got it, why you got 
it. Send him a picture. He'll relish it all, 
but more than that he'll feel that he is 
still part of your personal life. Actually, a 
man's world is very small and his strong- 
est emotions are tied to home and people 
he loves. And when you keep him in- 
formed, you're telling him that he hasn't 
really left so far as you're concerned. 

In my letters from mother and friends, 
they tell me about each other. Just simple 
things. Janette Davis writes about all my 
old co-workers on the Arthur Godfrey 
show: Godfrey says, "I'll bet Bill is Cap- 
tain of the Head," and I write naval offi- 
cer Arthur, "In the Army, we call it a 
latrine." 

Letters are the next best thing to a 
personal visit. Fort Dix is about three 
hours from Manhattan, so my mother gets 
down to visit me only on Sundays. But in 
between I have two letters from her and 
the usual packages. If you're ever doubt- 
ful about what to send your soldier, just 
think of something he can't get in the 
Army. For example, home-made cookies or 
candy. Or maybe he goes for something 
special like toasted almonds or olives or 
sardines. But you can bet it's not fried 
chicken he misses most. 

In my case, I miss my mother and the 
card games we had in our apartment with 
my friends. I miss singing on the show 
with Arthur and his "big family." I miss a 
good show and a big mattress and the free- 
dom to go wherever and whenever I choose. 
And your soldier misses these things, too, 
but they aren't really the most important. 

What he misses most is you. And that 
goes for Bill Lawrence, too! 



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73 



EXCLUSIVE! 

1 KNOW THE TRUTH ABOUT IT! 

LIZ TAYLOR, BACHELOR GIRL 

by Hedda Hopper 

in AUGUST 
PHOTOPLAY 

Liz knew a month after marriage she'd made 
a dreadful mistake. And because of what 
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74 




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HOW TO BE A HOSTESS 



JL 



(Continued from page 49) devastating. 
The camera followed the guest and me 
to the door for nearly one minute of 
aimless chatter that slowed up the show 
and probably made viewers whirl their 
dials to something more interesting. Right 
then and there I decided it is better to for- 
get the rules than to make a guest un- 
comfortable — and, in the case of TV, lose 
the audience. 

My definition of a hostess is very simple. 
She's a woman who puts the same careful 
care into planning a party as she would 
into planning a new garment for her ward- 
robe. Her first duty is to furnish a com- 
fortable setting for her guests. Her second 
duty is to invite the right people so that 
guests will find each other entertaining. 



A little bitterly I recall one small 
party given in my honor during a 
convention a couple of years ago. Eight of 
us were comfortably settled in the living 
room after a very nice dinner. The talk 
was stimulating and informative. Then the 
hostess announced that since I was new in 
town and she wanted me to have a really 
wonderful memory of my visit there — we 
would all sit down to an old-fashioned 
poker session. I protested that I didn't play 
cards, but because she thought I was just 
being modest she went right head and set 
up the table. I don't know a spade from a 
heart and after the first round of cards she 
was relieved when I suggested that I sit 
out the next few hands. My evening was 
spent emptying ashtrays and filling 
glasses. I carried away a memory but 
not the kind my hostess would relish. The 
hostess hadn't bothered to know her guests. 
So rule number two, in my book, is: al- 
ways plan for your guest's pleasure and 
forget what you, as the hostess, would pre- 
fer to do. 

There is one quality which all of us 
who want to be good hostesses can ac- 
quire — the quality of self-confidence, 
which in my dictionary is almost the same 
as unselfishness. I think this quality comes 
from a woman's being a genuine success 
— in what she does, whether it's in the 
field of world affairs or in running a good 
household. And that means being consid- 
erate, too. As a hostess don't you just hate 
late guests for ruining your dinner? I 
know I do for lateness is just as ruinous to 
my television show. Mrs. Roosevelt, an 
ideal guest, if there ever was one, was 
half an hour early the day she appeared on 
Vanity Fair. 

She didn't interrupt or demand special 
attention. Mrs. Roosevelt found each per- 
son she talked to stimulating and interest- 
ing. She asked questions and listened to 
the answers. Before the cameras, when 
broadcast time came, Mrs. Roosevelt was 
poised and assured. If each of us is to be 
a good hostess, I think we can learn from 
this example of a successful guest. 

Rule number three: If you plan ahead 
so that your house is neat and clean, your 
dinner or supper is well prepared, you can 
then relax in the knowledge that you are 
an assured human being — and let your 
guests take the spotlight. 

I think the perfect example of what 
thought and planning will do for a party 
was shown me not so long ago by a woman 



who has a small one-room apartment here 
in New York. After a lively hour of getting 
each guest introduced and comfortable 
with the others, dinner was served. There 
was no dining room, so a table had been 
set at one end of the living room. From the 
tiny kitchenette the hostess brought out 
a casserole of curry and placed this on a 
small table to her right. Then she put 
the women to work filling the water glasses 
and placing the hot food around the table. 
She occupied the men by having them hol- 
low out and shred a cocoanut. Everyone 
was finished with the chores at the same 
time and that awkward half hour of serv- 
ing time was turned into fun. 

In direct contrast to this I remember 
another party I attended when I was work- 
ing on a Pasadena, California, newspaper. 
The hostess began the afternoon by apolo- 
gizing for not having a bigger house. 
Among her guests were some women who 
had very amusing and interesting stories 
to tell but — as the afternoon wore on, I 
noticed that not once was any guest al- 
lowed to finish a story without the hostess 
interrupting to press a sandwich upon her 
... or empty an ashtray ... or kill a point 
with a spot of house-cleaning (she even 
got down on her hands and knees and 
cleaned some crumbs off the floor) . I re- 
solved then and there that the guest's con- 
versation is more important than her com- 
fort. It taught me that the over-solicitous 
hostess can be a bloody bore. Rule number 
four is: allow your guests to feel at home. 

There are few other specifics that I've 
learned over the years. Too much drink- 
ing makes for dullness. Introductions are 
another bothersome social formality which 
can be handled with grace instead of mak- 
ing everyone feel uncomfortable. The best 
rule is to fit an introduction in as you 
would any other part of your party. We 
allow our guests to catch their breath by 
letting them get their hats and coats de- 
posited and by letting the women freshen 
their make-up. Then instead of introducing 
the guests around the room during a large 
party, we introduce them to the group 
nearest the entrance. As they move along 
we see that they meet members of the next 
group and so on around the room. 



I do not approve of "business parties" 
as such but if your husband wants to 
invite his boss to dinner, by all means en- 
tertain him. But, do invite people whom 
you know he'll find interesting. Don't think 
it is necessary to invite the whole office 
force. Quite the contrary is true, for nine 
times out of ten the boss wants to come to 
your home because he's enjoyed your hus- 
band's company at the office and thinks it 
would be fun to relax with him. With the 
rest of the office present, he'll have to be 
on his best behaviour and so will the other 
guests and the results will be painful. 

One last bit of advice: let parties fall in 
the relative scheme of things. Elsa Max- 
well, probably the most famous party-giver 
of all, said she would come on my program 
— providing she didn't have to talk about 
giving parties. "After all," she told me, 
"all our famous hostesses today have much 
more important things to concern them- 
selves with — life is filled with so much 
more than just mere parties." 




Program 

highlights 

in television 

viewing 



New York City and Suburbs July 11 - August 10 
Baseball. Schedule for Television Viewing 



DATE 


TIME 


GAME CHANNEL 


Thursday, July 12 


1:30 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. D'gers 


9 


Friday, July 13 


1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. D'gers 


9 




8:30 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. Giants 


11 


Saturday, July 14 


1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. D'gers 


9 




1:30 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. Giants 


11 




9:00 P.M. 


Queens of Amer.* * 


7 


Sunday, July 15 


2:00 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. D'gers* 


9 




2:00 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants* 


11 


Monday, July 16 


1:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. D'gers 


9 




1:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 


Tuesday, July 17 


1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Dodgers 


9 


Wed.-Thurs., 


1:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Dodgers 


9 


July 18-19 


1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Giants 


11 


Friday, July 20 


8:30 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 




8:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. Giants 


11 


Saturday, July 21 


1:30 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 




1:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. Giants 


11 




9:00 P.M. 


Queens of Amer.* * 


7 


Sunday, July 22 


2:00 P.M. 


S. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 




2:00 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. Giants* 


11 


Tues.-Thurs., 


2:30 P.M. 


C'land vs. Yank. 


5 & 11 


July 24-26 








Friday, July 27 


8:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yank. 


11 


Saturday, July 28 


2:00 P.M. 


Chi' go vs. Yank.* 


5 & 11 


Sunday, July 29 


2:05 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Yank. 


5 & 11 


Monday, July 30 


8:30 P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yank. 


11 


Wed.-Thurs., 


2:30 P.M. 


Detroit vs. Yank. 


5 & 11 


August 1-2 








Fri.-Sat., 


2:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Yank. 


5 & 11 


August 3-4 








Sunday, August 5 


2:00 P.M. 


S.Louis vs. Yank.* 


5 & 11 


Monday, August 6 


8:30 P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yank. 


11 


Tuesday, August 7 


8:30 P.M. 


Giants vs. D'gers 


9 


Wed.-Thurs., 


1:30 P.M. 


Giants vs. D'gers 


9 


August 8-9 


2:30 P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yank. 


5 & 11 


Friday, August 10 


1:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


Boston vs. D'gers 


9 



*Doubleheader 

** Chicago home games from the National Women's Profes- 
sional Baseball League 




Monday 



1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 

Baltimore-born Garry, who once collaborated on 
a play with F. Scott Fitzgerald, in variety. 

2:30 P.M. First Hundred Years • 2 

Daytime comedy serial of young married life, 
starring Olive Stacey and Jimmy Lydon. 

3:00 P.M. Miss Susan • 4 

Screen star Susan Peters as Miss Susan Martin, a 
successful lawyer, confined to a wheelchair. 

3:30 P.M. Remember This Dale • 4 

Bill Stern, award winning sportscaster. with an 
audience participation quiz and merchandise 
prizes (Tuesday & Thursday). 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6,200 • 4 

Over 30 actors a week contribute to the warmth 
and humor of the people in this typical American 
town, Philip Lord in the role of Judge Sharp. 

5:00 P.M. Mary Hartline's Show • 7 

The pretty blonde who captivates youngsters and 
adults alike with music and games from Chicago. 

5:30 P.M. Howdy Uoody • 4 

Bob Smith and his delightful puppets. 

7:00 P.M. Captain Video • 5 

Science adventure featuring Al Hodges in the 
title role of the interplanetary hero. Don Hastings 
plays his juvenile sidekick, the Video Ranger. 

7:00 P.M. Time for Ernie • 4 

From Philadelphia, the city of peace, the riotous, 
zany burlesquing of Ernie Kovacs. 

7:45 P.M. Mel Tonne • 2 (M, W & F) 

Perry Como takes a vacation and the "velvet fog" 
blows in assisted by sweet-singing Mindy Carson. 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 

John Cameron Swayze, winner of twenty awards 
for newscasting, with the day's events. 




tAo« 



7:30 P.M. Hollywood Screen Test • 7 

Two Hollywood aspirants compete for film con- 
tract aided by a guest star and emcee, Neil Hamil- 
ton. 

0:00 P.M. Pantomime Quiz Time • 2 

The TV Academy Award winner featuring Holly- 
wood stars in charades. Mike Stokey, emcee. 

0:00 P.M. Cameo Theater • 4 

Albert McCleery directs, using arena theater 
technique, special music and lighting. 

0:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Hoosier comedian, Herb Shriner, spells Arthur 
Godfrey beginning July 30, as talented newcom- 
ers bid for stardom. 

8:30 P.M. Voice of Firestone • 4 

Howard Barlow conducts the orchestra and 
chorus with concerts by distinguished musical 
artists. 

9:00 P.M. Lights Out • 4 

Tales of the supernatural. Frank Gallop, "the 
face," is hollow-voiced narrator. 

9:30 P.M. Who's Who • 2 

Phil Baker takes over for the Goldbergs with a 
new quiz-identification game. 

9:30 P.M. Somerset Maugham Theater • 4 

Full hour dramas adapted from the novels of the 
celebrated author. Biweekly: July 9 & 23. 

10:00 P.M. Westinghouse Summer Theater • 2 

Hostess Betty Furness, with reruns of TV dramas. 



75 



•Tuesday 



H 
M 

76 



7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

The merry mix-ups in the Henderson family 
always involving playful housekeeper, Beulah, 
played by Hattie McDaniel. Others: Butterfly 
McQueen, William Post, Jr., Ginger Jones. 

8:00 P.M. Pinky Lee Show • 4 

Taking part of Uncle Miltie's time, Pinky Lee, 
Puck-like, lisping comedian, who started as a 
youngster with Gus Edwards and is widely re- 
membered for appearances with Rudy Vallee. 



8:00 P.M. Court ot Current Issues • 5 

In a typical courtroom setting, the judge puts 
on trial the most dramatic questions of the day. 
Outstanding personalities appear as witnesses 
with Irvin Sulds, creator, serving as "clerk." 



8:30 P.M. Johns Hopkins Science Review • 5 

The recent Peabody Award Winner program 
takes you behind the scenes in experimental 
work and discards professional terminology for 
layman's explanations. Lynn Poole, creator and 
producer, is your host. 



8:30 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 

Fun with children, Jack Barry moderating. His 
secret of success is to treat children with the 
same individual respect you would give adults. 



9:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Bands • 5 

Buddy Rogers, who now makes his home in Man- 
hattan with wife Mary Pickford and their chil- 
dren, is handsome host to big name bands. 



9:00 P.M. Q. E. D. • 7 

From the mystery file, emcee Fred Uttal, attempts 
to stump a board of experts with questions on 
crime. Panelists : Harold G. Hoffman, ex-governor 
of New Jersey; Hi Brown, producer of Inner 
Sanctum; witty actress, Nina Foch, and others. 

9:30 P.M. Life Beyins at Eiyhty • 7 

Octogenarians all but as bright and witty as any 
panel on TV. Youthful Jack Barry poses straight 
and funny questions to Georgianna Carhart, 85, 
former concert singer, John Dranuy, 89, former 
railroad engineer, Fred Stein, 82, realtor. 



9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 

Exciting, tense drama that will needle your spine 
for thirty full minutes. Robert Stevens directs. 



10:00 P.M. Danyer • 2 

Charles W. Russell, who has acted for radio and 
movies, produces chillers of ill-fated people. 

MO:00 P.M. Oriyinal Amateur Hour • 4 

The talent show so close to American hearts for 
17 years that it is almost an institution. Ted 
Mack, emcee, reveals that over 700,000 amateurs 
have been auditioned and 12,000 went on the air. 

10:00 P.M. Royal Crest Theater • 5 

A new series of feature films with actress Helen 
Twelvetrees as your hostess. 

1 1:00 P.M. Broadway Open House • 4 

The comedian who shakes like jelly, Jack E. 
Leonard, shares laughs with statuesque blonde, 
Dagmar, Ray Malone, Kirby Stone Quartet. 




7:30 P.M. Chance of a Lifetime • 7 

Jovial John Reed King with the famous audience 
participation quiz that pays off in handsome 
prizes and savings bonds worth a thousand dol- 
lars and more. Lovely Cindy Cameron assists 
John along with comedian Dick Collier, and 
song-dance team, Russell Arms and Liza Palmer, 
who fell in love and married after meeting on a 
Christmas eve TV show. 

8:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 

Arthur takes a well-earned vacation but the show 
goes on headlining vocalists Janette Davis, Hale- 
loke, Marion Marlowe and tenor Frank Parker, 
with Chordettes, Mariners and Archie Bleye,r. 

8:00 P.M. The Ruyyles • 7 

Family comedy filmed in Hollywood and starring 
the grand actor Charley Ruggles, 59-year-old 
comedian born in Los Angeles next door to the 
film industry that has made him so famous. 

9:00 P.M. Charlie Wild • 2 

The tough, slugging private eye who will tackle 
any crime is played by veteran performer, John 
McQuade, who began his career as a boy soprano. 

9:00 P.M. Kraft Theater • 4 

The fine dramatic show, now celebrating its fifth 
year on TV, with excellently produced and cast 
plays adapted from stage classics of all times. 

9:00 P.M. Down You Go: • 5 

Quiz show based on parlor game, "Hang the 
Butcher." Moderator is Dr. Bergen Evans. 
Panelists: Toni Gilman, stage star; Carmelita 
Pope, actress; Fran Coughlin, writer; Prof. 
Robert Breen of Northwestern University. 




9:30 P.M. The Web • 2 

Men trapped by fate with no escape but death is 
the theme of half-hour dramas culled from the 
pens of the Mystery Writers of America. Franklin 
Heller, director of What's My Line?, produces. 






9:30 P.M. Shadow of the Cloak • 5 

Counter-espionage series with Helmut Dantine 
investigating insidious operations. 

9:30 P.M. Wrestliny from Chieayo 

The grapplers grimace, grunt, growl and groan 
from Rainbow Arena as Wayne Griffin peeks 
from his foxhole where many times he has 
ducked a flying mare. 

10:00 P.M. international Boxiny Club • 2 

Dennis James, known for his wrestling commen- 
tary, is sportscaster on "Blue Ribbon" bouts 
originating from Chicago Stadium, Detroit Olym- 
pia, St. Louis Arena and St. Nicholas Arena. 

MO:00 P.M. Break the Bank • 4 

Bert Parks, who spent three weeks behind the 
Jap lines in World War II, asks ten questions 
worth ten to 500 dollars with a chance at the 
bank which has held over 9,000 dollars. Bud 
Collyer is your host with music by Peter Van 
Steeden's orchestra. 



:30 P.M. Stars Over Hollywood • 4 

Original comedies and light dramas, filmed in the 
motion picture capital, especially for video. Cast 
with Hollywood stars as well as newcomers. 






sdoy 






Thor 



7:30 P.M. The L.one Hanger • 7 

Cast to proportions of the courageous law-enforce- 
ment officers of the Old Wild West, the masked 
rider and Silver fearlessly combat crime. 

ttzOO P.M. Starlight Theater • 2 

Dramas featuring well-known stars in top ro- 
mantic roles, set in the contemporary scene. 
Biweekly: July 12 & 26, August 9. Alternating 
with — 

liurnn and Allen 
Along with popular comic-announcer Bill Good- 
win, Georgie and Gracie chase through hilarious 
madcaps for as Gracie notes she was born in San 
Francisco the year of the big earthquake. 

3:00 P.M. It Pan* to he Ignorant • 4 

Groucho rests and timeless comic Tom Howard 
takes over, jokingly assisted by George Shelton, 
Lulu McConnell and Harry McNaughton. 

B:00 P.M. Stop the Music • 7 

Zestful, indefatigable Bert Parks again with the 
TV edition of the show he made famous. Marion 
Morgan, Jimmy Blaine and Betty Ann Grove in 
cute musical sketches that furnish clues for those 
who stop the music for prizes worth up to $15,000. 

3:00 P.M. The Al Morgan Show • 5 

From Chicago, the very popular variety show 
featuring Al Morgan, singer and pianist. 

tt:30 P.M. Amos '»' Andg • 2 

The saga that has kept the nation chuckling for 
25 years with Amos played by Alvin Childress, 
Andy, Spencer Williams, Kingfish, Tim Moore. 

B:30 P.M. Treasury Men in Action • 4 

Stories from the closed files of the U. S. Treasury 
Department with exciting integrated film and 
live performances. Walter Greaza, with more than 
30 Broadway plays to his credit, as the "Chief." 

9:00 P.M. Ford Festival • 4 

Starring James Melton, who made his first ap- 
pearance in New York's Roxy Theater. Story 
lines that embrace all factors of show business 
with orchestra directed by David Broekman. 

9:00 P.M. Ellery Queen • 5 

The super-criminologist plays for keeps in this 
crime series loaded with startling situations. 
Ellery is portrayed by Lee Bowman with Florenz 
Ames as Inspector Queen, Ellery 's father. 

9:30 P.M. Big Town • 2 

Pat McVey, married to Milwaukee actress Cour- 
teen Landis, cast as Steve Wilson, earthy, hard- 
working reporter, in action-paced series of a 
crusading editor. Mary K. Wells as Lorelei. 

10:00 P.M. Freddg Martin Show • 4 

The popular maestro, raised in an orphanage, 
knows about humble beginnings and premieres a 
new show to help amateur musicians. Each week 
a musician is selected until a complete new band 
is formed. Merv Griffin is vocalist. 

10:30 P.M. Crime Photographer • 2 

Casey, click man, who strays into murders and 
excitement, assisted by Inspector Logan. 

10:30 P.M. if u ie li on the Draw • 4 

The cartoon-charade series featuring pretty 
Eloise McElhone as emcee. King Features car- 
toonist, Bob Durin draws charades while a guest 
panel tries questions submitted by TV audience. 

1 1 :00 P.M. Broadway Open Bouse • 4 

See Tuesday, 11:00 P.M., for description. 



fridoY 



tt:00 P.M. Quiz Kids • 4 

The winsome, Windy City youngsters whose 
amazing brilliance and wit make for thorough 
adult enjoyment. Joe Kelly poses ingenious visual 
quiz to Joel Kupperman, 14, Harvey Dytch, 7, 
and guests. 

tt:30 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

Ralph Bellamy plays he-man Mike Barnett, a 
shrewd, hard-hitting private detective. Bellamy, 
in his teens, had his sights set on the theater as 
president of his high school dramatic club. 

9:00 P.M. The Door with No Name • 4 

Replacing Big Story for the summer is this fast 
moving crime series of a government agent who 
probes murders no one else can solve. Grant 
Richards, Hollywood actor, in starring role. Mel 
Ruich plays the part of his agency chief. 

9:00 P.M. Hands ot Destiny • 5 

Original TV melodramas cast with Broadway 
veterans. Author Lawrence Menkin explains the 
title comes from the belief that all emotions 
funnel through the hands for it is the hands that 
perform the final act of violence. 

9:00 P.M. Pulitzer Prize Playhouse • 7 

Excellently produced dramas featuring docu- 
mentary treatment of Pulitzer Prize news stories 
as well as plays and novels from the pen of 
past Pulitzer winners. 

9:00 P.M. Film Firsts • 2 

Feature films never before seen on television. 
July 13th, "The Gay Intruder"; July 20, "Man In 
Black"; July 27, "Topper' Takes A Trip" with 
Constance Bennett, Cary Grant, Roland Young 
and Billie Burke; August 3, "Hell's Devils", 
starring Alan Ladd; Aug. 10, "The Man Who 
Lost Himself" wirth Brian Aherne and Kay 
Francis. 

9:30 P.M. Front Page Detective • 5 

Edmund Lowe, many years a star of stage and 
screen, stars in sleuthing that rocks the headlines 
of daily papers as he uncovers corruption. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade ot Sports • 4 

Jimmy Powers, as well known for his TV and 
radio commentary as his daily column, is sports- 
caster for boxing and other sports events. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 

Stellar name guests in company with comedian- 
emcee Jackie Gleason, once a daredevil driver in 
an auto circus. The June Taylor Dancers trip the 
light fantastic with music by Sammy Spear. 

MO:00 P.M. Star of the Family • 2 

You'll meet relatives of famous show people 
along with the stars themselves who perform 
their specialties. Program moves to 6:30 P.M. on 
Sundays, beginning July 29th, with Peter Lind 
Hayes and Mary Healy as your hosts. 

MO:00 P.M. Jerry Colonna • 7 

Fog-horned voice comic in new variety comedy. 

10:4.% P.M. Great Fights of the Century • 4 

History-making events from the ring on film : July 
13, Joe Louis vs. Tony Galento; July 20. Billy 
Conn vs. Melio Bettina; July 27, Mickey Walker 
vs. Max Schmeling; August 3, Jack Dempsey vs. 
Gene Tunney, Chicago; August 10, Joe Louis vs. 
Charley Retzlaff, Barney Ross vs. Ceferino 
Garcia. 



11:00 P.M. Broadway Open Bouse • 4 

See Tuesday, 11:00 P.M., for description. 



R 
IW 

77 




11:30 A.M. Date with Judy • 7 

Completely revamped for TV, the famous radio 
program with its family situations complicated 
by teen-age Judy. Producer is Aleen Leslie. 
12:00 Noon Big Top • 2 

Elephants, jugglers, acrobats along with others 
make up this full hour fun-fest with ringmaster 
Jack Sterling, clowns McMahon and Keegan. 
12:30 P.M. Faith Baldwin Theater • 7 

Stirring stories of romance from the pen of Faith 
Baldwin. Authoress Baldwin narrates the stories 
herself with stars cast in the leading roles. Bi- 
weekly: July 14 & 28. Alternating with — 

I Cover Times Square 
Ace newspaper columnist Johnny Warren, played 
by Harold Huber, covers Times Square to uncover 
the angles and angels that make it the heart of 
the city. Biweekly: July 21 and August 4. 

i:00 P.M. Laraine Day Show • 7 

One of the loveliest and most gracious ladies on 
TV, Laraine Day, actress and wife of Leo 
Durocher, weaves entertainment and interviews. 

6:00 P.M. Studs 9 Place • 7 

From Chicago, a genuine human show of every- 
day people who frequent a diner. Studs Terkel 
manages the eatery; Chet Roble is at the key- 
board and Beverly Younger is seen as Grace. 

7:30 P.M. Beat the Clock • 2 

Bud Collyer, one of TV's nicest people, with a 
clever audience stunt show. Contestants compete 
for prizes worth one to several hundred dollars. 

7:30 P.M. One Man's Family • 4 

Bert Lytell, who made his acting debut as Marie 
Dressler's nephew, plays Father Barbour in this 
well-loved series. Marjorie Gateson as Mother. 

7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin Show • 7 

Stu and June Collyer, who celebrate their 20th 
wedding anniversary this July 22, in bright com- 
edy about the hi-jinks of a school principal. 

0:00 P.M. TV Teen Club • 7 

61-year-old maestro Paul Whiteman with an 
elaborate summer show featuring pert Nancy 
Lewis, Junie Keegan and Sonny Graham. 

0:00 P.M. Feature Films • 2 & 4 

NBC and CBS come up with movies for times 
vacated by Jack Carter and Ken Murray. 

9:00 P.M. Summer Hayride • 4 

An hour barn dance from Cincinnati. Emcee 
Bill Thall with singers Judy Perkins and Lee 
Jones, plus Kentucky Briar Hoppers, the 
Rangers, Pine Mountain Boys and many others. 

9:00 P.M. Faye Emerson Show • 2 

Thirty minutes with the beguiling queen of TV. 
Faye admits she gets brickbats as well as bou- 
quets from fans but aims to continue covering a 
wide range of subjects in behind-the-scene visits. 

9:00 P.M. They Stand Accused • S 

Provocative marital questions that form the crux 
of difference between man and woman are sub- 
jects for this realistic courtroom drama. 

9:30 P.M. The Show Goes On • 2 

Robert Q. Lewis (the Q for quixotic, quick and 
qute) interviews prospective buyers of talent and 
auditions entertainers in hopes of a sale. 
I 0:00 P.M. Sing it Aguin • 2 

Comic Jan Murray, selected as TV's best-dressed 
man, selects jokes and contestants for the song 
quiz, offering savings bonds as prizes. Alan Dale 
and Judy Lynn add visual and vocal clues. 
10:00 P.M. Doodles Weaver Show • 4 

A half-hour "mad-house" of comedy featuring 
mad clown Doodles and a crazy trio of stooges. 
B 10:30 P.M. Assignment: Mun Hunt • 4 
M Subbing for Hit Parade, this semi-documentary 

thriller with detectives in pursuit of vicious 
killers. Dan Petrie is in charge. 
78 



Sonday 



5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 

A mammoth show in the best traditions of the big 
ring with Ringmaster Claude Kirchner, clowns 
Cliffy, Scampy, bandleader Mary Hartline. 

6:00 P.M. Hopalong Cassidy • 4 

Shoot 'em up Westerns, filmed in Hollywood for 
TV, starring Bill Boyd in title role. Latest enter- 
prise of Bill's is an 80-acre park for children in 
California, aptly called, "Hoppyland." 

6:00 P.M. Ted Much Family Hour • 7 

Ted, who makes his home along the Hudson's Rip 
Van Winkle country, presents professional enter- 
tainers in songs, music and dance in a format 
fashioned after the late Major Bowes' program. 

7:00 P.M. Gene Autry • 2 

America's favorite singing cowboy filmed in 
action packed Westerns. Horse-ridin' Gene also 
pilots his own plane whenever he takes long trips. 

7:00 P.M. Leave It to the Girls • 4 

Moderator Maggi McNellis may collect porcelain 
cupids but here she spurs on the girls in their 
unceasing warfare against the male sex. Panel- 
ists : Elorse McElhone, Dorothy Kilgallen, Harriet 
Van Home with one man as a sitting duck. 

7:00 P.M. Paul Whiteman Revue • 7 

A grand musicale with Pops' vocal and dance 
groups and featuring baritone Earl Wrightson 
and soprano Maureen Cannon, who made her 
debut at 12 in Chicago. 

7:30 P.M. Go Lucky • 2 

A brand-new quiz game patterned after the old 
parlor favorite, "Coffee Pot." Contestants, 
chosen from the audience, pair off to try their 
luck at prizes for "coffee-potting" celebrities. 

7:45 P.M. Theatre ot Movie Classics • 9 

Rudolph Valentino, Vilma Banky, Bebe Daniels, 
Doug Fairbanks, Sr., are just a few of yester- 
day's favorites seen in this series. 

0:00 P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 

Ed Sullivan will take a few weeks' vacation but 
cheer will continue with the usual great variety 
show plus Ray Bloch's band and the Toastettes. 

8:30 P.M. Concert Hull • 4 

Recitals by some of our finest artists. 

9:00 P.M. Guest House • 2 

A show-biz-quiz as top guest performers appear 
before a panel of experts to act, sing or dance 
out riddles. 

9:00 P.M. Philco Playhouse • 4 

Gordon Duff, once an economics teacher, directs 
this dramatic showpiece, presenting full hour TV 
plays adapted from best-selling books. 

9:00 P.M. Rocky King, Detective • 5 

Roscoe Karns, quizzical-faced Hollywood char- 
acter actor, in title role with who-dunits stressing 
believable police work rather than violence. 

9:30 P.M. The Plainclothesmun • 5 

Ken Lynch portrays the hard-working police lieu- 
tenant probing baffling murders while the camera 
functions as his eye and only his voice is heard. 
Jack Orrison is cast as his assistant, Sgt. Brady. 

10:00 P.M. Celebrity Time 

Conrad Nagel, born 1897 in Keokuk, Illinois, 
deftly directs the game and fun session between 
celebrities and 300-pound Yale coach Herman 
Hickman and musical star Mary McCarty. 

M0:30 P.M. What's My Line? • 2 

A challenging quiz show as the panel tries to 
determine the occupation of contestants. John 
Daly moderates the rotating experts: columnist 
Dorothy Kilgallen, poet Louis Untermeyer, com- 
edy writer Hal Block, and actress Arlene Francis. 



GORDON MACRAE 

(Continued from page 37) know that!) 
Right now, after three years of working 
with him, those first impressions are 
still with me only more. so. What a 
wonderful person he is when the going 
gets hard, as it sometimes will on any 
show. Never any signs of stage fright. 
He's one of the most reliable performers 
I've ever come across in years of working 
with a great many of them. Not only does 
Gordie keep himself and his part well in 
hand, but he has a kindly eye out for 
everyone else on the program. If an actor 
drops a line, misses a cue, or suffers from 
momentary forgetfulness, there's Gordie, 
smoothing over the rough spot so beau- 
tifully that the audience never suspects. 



Gordie is really serious about his 
work. Not that he's a sourpuss — be- 
lieve me, there's no one quicker with a 
gag, no one more willing to kid. But never 
during working time. He's completely — 
and unaffectedly — sincere about every 
part he plays, every song he sings. And 
especially about The Railroad Hour. After 
all, he says, it's this show that's respon- 
sible in a large part for putting him in 
the enviable position he's enjoying today, 
and he never forgets that for a minute. 

The lack of temperamental displays on 
Gordie's part stems, I'm sure, from the 
fact that the high-strung, hurry-scurry- 
worry "artisticness" that so many perform- 
ers call temperament has no part in him. 
He is an artist, without any need for im- 
pressing the fact on doubters because 
there aren't any doubters. He's relaxed, 
sure of himself, Gordie is. If he makes a 
mistake while singing, he knows it and 
doesn't try to brush it off lightly or lay the 
blame on any convenient pair of shoulders. 
He's the first to admit it, because mistakes 
bo^er him a lot. 

So there's not a temperamental bone in 
his oooy. Nor a jealous bone, either — 
and that's pretty rare in this business, 
too. It's nice to hear the respect in Gordie's 
voice when he speaks of the work of 
others. If he thinks you're good, he's thor- 
oughly sold on you — and loyal. For in- 
stance, the MacRaes are a home-loving 
pair, not given to nightclubbing. But let 
a performer Gordie knows about, has faith 
in, open at a local spot and there are 
Gordon and his pretty Sheila on hand with 
applause and general moral support. 

There's such an abundance of energy 
wrapped up in Gordie! He's the first to 
start, the last to run down, during re- 
hearsal. He simply wouldn't understand 
what it would be to rest on his laurels. 
His excess energy he applies, when he's 
not actually working on rehearsal, to vocal- 
izing. You never lose Gordie — you can 
always tell, by the vocalizing, just where 
he is at any given moment. And his en- 
thusiasms are as many as his ability is 
great. There was the recent Railroad Hour 
performance of "Madame Butterfly" for 
instance. The lead, Lt. Pinkerton, is writ- 
ten for tenor — but baritone MacRae car- 
ried it off with great verve all the same, 
and it was terrific! 

For my money, the whole MacRae fam- 
ily comes right up in the terrific class, 
anyway. Sheila, a tearing beauty even in 




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The TRUTH about 

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R 
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80 




this town where beauty comes by the 
bushel, is also a wonderful person. It 
won't be long before Sheila and Gordon 
celebrate their tenth wedding anniversary, 
and celebrating with them will be their 
three delightful children, Meredith Lynn, 
who's seven, Heather Allison, five and two- 
year-old William Gordon, called Gar. 

Sheila and Gordon met when the Mill- 
pond Stock Company, of which Sheila was 
a member, held tryouts for new actors. 
Privately surveying the field that was wait- 
ing to audition, Sheila spotted Gordon 
and, she tells me, didn't think much of 
him. There he was, filling in the waiting 
time humming and trying out a soft-shoe 
routine. Obviously he didn't have his mind 
— as Sheila most emphatically did at the 
moment — on Higher Things. He didn't 
take his Art seriously. He was, Sheila de- 
cided, a low-brow, and as such he didn't 
make much headway when he began trying 
to date her. 



"T meant to be a great star," Sheila 
J. says. "All I thought about was the 
theatre, except," she confesses, "when I 
thought about myself. and how terribly tal- 
ented I was! As a matter of fact, I first 
dated Gordon because he seemed like a 
good person to fritter away my time while 
I was trying to recover from the loss of 
the Great Love of my Life." 

Fortunately, Sheila's parents, when she 
brought Gordie home to meet them, took 
to him at once. For a while Sheila con- 
vinced herself that she only tolerated 
Gordie for her parents' sake, but pretty 
soon she forgot all that nonsense and 
decided that her own sake was a better 
— and more honest — reason for liking to 
have Gordie around. 

Probably you know the story of Gordie's 
big break — it's the one they tell of a lot 
of stars, but in his case it's really true. 
When the Millpond Stock Company broke 
up at the end of the summer season, 
Gordie got a job as an NBC page boy in 
New York. He was happy and he sang 
as he bustled around Radio City. And yes, 
you guessed it — a big-timer heard him, 
liked his voice, asked him if he wouldn't 
like to stop paging and take a job with 
his band. In this case the big-timer was 
representing Horace Heidt, and, as in any 
other cases of the sort on record, the page 
boy said a big and firm "Yes!" Why, the 
salary was the stratospheric sum of fifty 
dollars a week — even though Gordie hadn't 
thought much about singing profession- 
ally, who wouldn't jump at such an offer? 

It was that very night, after the historic 
Heidt meeting, that Gordie proposed to 
Sheila. She met him at Radio City so they 
could go to dinner together and he could 
tell her his wonderful news. But when 
they met he led the way, instead of to a 
restaurant, to a little jewelry shop. There 
Gordie bought a diamond and put it on 
Sheila's finger. "The smallest one in the 
shop, and Gordie was months paying for 
it," Sheila tells you, "but it was, and still 
is, the most beautiful of jewels to me." 

Gordie went to Cleveland with the Heidt 
orchestra. They wrote every day, and 
Gordie telephoned long distance when- 
ever he could, but it wasn't enough. Gor- 
don, the cheery _ one, moped until the 
Heidts took pity on him — or, maybe, on 
the rest of the members of the company. 



Anyway, Mrs. Heidt telephoned Sheila's 
mother, begged her to allow Sheila to 
visit with them, promised a careful chap- 
eronage for still-teen-aged Sheila. That 
was in the spring, and everyone knows 
what spring does to young love. Sheila 
and Gordie were no different from any 
other in-love youngsters. It wasn't long 
before they were hunting a minister. 

I like the story Sheila tells about their 
wedding. Although they were in a strange 
city, so of course the minister they found 
was a stranger, he wasn't the kind who 
marries a pair of young people unless 
he's sure they know what they're doing, 
sure that they are really in love. 

"He told me," Sheila says, "that no 
couple he'd married had ever been di- 
vorced. And he wanted to know if I 
realized how important a step this was. 
I told him how very much in love I was, 
which seemed to me a complete answer 
to the question. But it wasn't, and I've 
never forgotten what he told me then. You 
have to be more than in love, he told me. 
You have to be willing to give up every 
other thing that's important to you, if 
necessary, to make your marriage succeed. 
You have to make up your mind that your 
husband will come first in your thoughts, 
that you're prepared to serve and cherish 
him all your life." 

Sheila must have convinced the wise 
and kindly old man that this was what 
marriage meant to her, because Sheila 
and Gordie were married that day. Nowa- 
days, no one who knows the MacRaes 
could help but be convinced that this is 
exactly what marriage still means to 
Sheila. And to Gordon, too. With them, 
their marriage comes first. 

Sheila is a better rememberer of spe- 
cific appointments than Gordon is, but 
he's one of those rare and wonderful men 
who never forgets an anniversary or a 
special occasion. He remembers all the 
little days, the small remember-when occa- 
sions, as well as the more obvious birth- 
days and holidays. 

The best important-occasion celebration 
from the MacRae children's point of view 
is the one they're allowed at such times 
as birthdays. Then they attend the Rail- 
road Hour show, and how they love it! 
And how I enjoy seeing Meredith and 
Heather, sitting in ladylike decorum in 
the client's booth, watching Daddy with 
wide eyes and undisguised admiration! 



BY now you'll have realized that my 
own admiration for Gordon MacRae 
is in the undisguised class. My work con- 
sists of seeing him at Friday rehearsals, at 
an occasional Sunday rehearsal, and of 
course all day Monday, which is show day. 
But this is only a part of my work in con- 
nection with the Railroad Hour. You see, 
preparation for each program begins at 
least two weeks before the date it's to go 
on the air. There's a lot of routine. Clear- . 
ing music rights, sending scripts to be 
mimeographed, notifying cast, sometimes J 
helping to cast acting roles, arranging 
for studio and rehearsal time at NBC | 
— all these chores I must be in on, and 
all must be done before the initial re- 
hearsal of the show. 

Friday is the first get-together — what's 
called a rough dress with piano accom- 
paniment — and then comes the cutting and 



re-writing of the script. On Monday comes 
complete rehearsal, full cast and full or- 
chestra, as long as necessary to get the 
program in shape. Show time itself is 
never nerve-wracking. With Gordon on 
hand there's a lack of tension, and it's 
tension that wracks nerves. 

Gordie's always considerate of the peo- 
ple who work for and with him. The team 
that puts on the Railroad Hour is just 
that — a team. Conductor-arranger Carmen 
Dragon has a great deal of respect for 
Gordie, and that respect is mutual. This 
admiration is shared by Norman Luboff, 
who's choir director. 

Gordie shows the same earnestness 
toward his fans that he does concerning 
his work. They're very important people, 
those fans, and he never loses track of the 
fact — as some performers do, once they've 
reached the top — that if it weren't for the 
fans who love him he wouldn't have got 
up the long, hard ladder. And if they 
lon't continue to love him he won't stay 
there. And so, he loves them in return. He 
never brushes aside the crowd outside 
the back door — the artists' entrance, it's 
called — at NBC. He stops to talk, to give 
autographs, to make the youngsters know 
he's their friend. 

In case you've decided by now that 
Gordon MacRae is just about perfect, let 
me hasten to correct this. He's not — that 
would be awfully dull. He has faults, sure, 
like any normal human being. For in- 
stance, there's that forgetfulness of his I 
mentioned before. I have to keep extra- 
good track of appointments, because 
Gordie doesn't. He has to be reminded. 
Sometimes he's late for rehearsals on 
account of he's got himself involved in an 
exciting golf game. But he's never late 
for a show, and has never missed a show. 

I have a special reason of my own for 
thinking of Gordie — and of Sbeila, too, 
for that matter — as a really kind and 
thoughtful person. A little while back I 
was rushed to the hospital with an attack 
of appendicitis. That was the afternoon 
of the show, the last one to be recorded 
before Gordie left for a trip to New York. 
then I swam out of the ether, minus my 
appendix, next morning, there was a 
phone call from Gordie and Sheila, who 
absolutely refused to leave town until 
they were sure I was out of danger! 

I don't think you'll find it hard to un- 
derstand why, when people ask me, "Bet, 
don't you want to quit your job and be 
a housewife?" I shake my head and 
answer a most positive, "Not for me!" 
sure, I'm happily married— but my hus- 
band, Howard Cooley, doesn't stay home 
to be a housewife, either, and the only 
reason I can see for staying home would 
be to be with him. Howard does his job 
is an NBC engineer — and I'll keep right 
on doing mine as Railroad Hour secre- 
tary, thanks! What could I find to do at 
lome that would be half so much fun? 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

When changing your address please promptly 
advise your postmaster and Macfadden Publi- 
cations, Inc., six weeks in advance, furnishing 
both your old address (printed label) and your 
new address, in order that copies of RADIO 
MIRROR may continue to reach you without 
delay. Such notification may be by letter or on 
post office card Forms 22 and 22-S , respec- 
tively, which your postmaster will supply on 
request 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS, INC. 
205 E. 42nd Street New York 17, N. Y. 



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WASN'T IT A LOVELY WEDDING? 



(Continued from page 39) we've made 
many wonderful friends with whom we 
still correspond, although we haven't even 
met most of them. 

I suppose every girl dreams of a big, 
big wedding, with literally thousands of 
people on hand. I'm one of the fortunate 
few who has been able to share the happi- 
ness of my life's biggest moment with 
so many. And it was such a beautiful wed- 
ding. The quiet dignity of the wedding 
chapel which the Bride and Groom pro- 
ducers have built as a setting for the pro- 
gram; the warm, pleasant friendliness of 
John Nelson, the master of ceremonies; 
and the cordial, sincere attitude of the 
Rev. Harold J. Quigley, who officiated, all 
combined to make my wedding a memory 
which Dick and I shall cherish always. 

I think there's something appropriate in 
our being married on Bride and Groom, 
with people in many cities in many parts 
of the country among the viewers. You see, 
Dick and I come from widely-separated 
places, Vermont and Texas. 

I went to Wheaton and Simmons Col- 
leges, then came to Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology to work as a secretary. 
Dick came to M.I.T. to do graduate work. 
He's now working for the Air Force in 
electronics at M.I.T. 

We met at a party given for the M.I.T. 
laboratory where I work. There were many 
people there, but I noticed one particu- 
larly handsome man surrounded by a 
crowd of girls. I couldn't help noticing 
that he was making dates with many of 
the girls, and I made up my mind he was 
a wolf. 

A few minutes later, someone intro- 
duced Dick to me, and he immediately 
asked me for a date. I turned him down. 
Even the wolf in the fairy tale went after 
only one Little Red Riding-Hood. 

Oh, I admit that I felt a tingle of excite- 
ment when he called me — which he did 
every day during the following week. I 
found it harder and harder to refuse him 
a date, and was really happy when he 
finally suggested that I go with him and a 
group of four others to a hit play. 

Dick, much to my surprise, behaved like 
a perfect gentleman. I still didn't believe 
him when he repeated his earlier statement 
— that the moment he first met me he knew 
I was the girl for him and that I was go- 
ing to marry him. 

Every day after that, Dick phoned 
me and asked for another date, and I kept 
refusing. Finally, though, I gave in and 
went with him to a baseball game. 

On the way home, Dick asked me to 
marry him. I said no. I told him why, 
too. He was too good-looking, too con- 
ceited, too much of a playboy. Besides, I 
didn't love him. 

After that, I gave him an occasional 
date, and every time we went out he'd pro- 
posed to me. I kept finding it more and 
more difficult to turn him down. 

My situation was getting more and more 
confused, too. There was another boy in 
Minnesota of whom I was very fond, and 
he had been asking me to marry him. He 
was coming East for the holidays and I 
promised to give him my answer during his 
visit. I mentioned this to Dick, of course, 
and if you ever saw a man eaten up with 
jealousy, it was Dick from then on. He 



insisted that I couldn't have the other 
fellow come to Massachusetts to visit me. 

"He's coming and I'm going to give him 
my answer, and it will probably be 'yes,' " 
I announced firmly. The angrier Dick 
got, the more I became convinced that he 
did love me. And that I loved him. 

Finally Dick said, "All right, be stub- 
born and have your boy friend come out 
for Christmas — but marry me first." 

Being a woman, I suppose it's only nat- 
ural stubbornness that kept me from agree- 
ing to marry Dick when he wanted. But 
when he called me next day, and asked 
me again to marry him in December, I 
said I'd marry him in February. He said 
he'd accept the later date if I'd not let 
my boy friend from Minnesota come out. 

From then on, our romance progressed 
beautifully. 

Discussing our wedding plans, we de- 
cided it would be nice to have Dick's rela- 
tives in Texas and mine in Vermont pres- 
ent, but realized it would be difficult for 
many of them to make the trip. That's 
when we decided to apply to Bride and 
Groom, so our families could see our wed- 
ding through the miracle of television. 

We wrote for an application and held 
our breath while waiting for word. How 
thrilled we were when Harriett Snelling, 
hostess on the program, called long-dis- 
tance to tell us we had been chosen. 

The weeks that followed were hectic 
ones. Fortunately I was spared the added 
task of arranging details of the ceremony. 
The Bride and Groom people took care of 
all the arrangements, efficiently and with 
taste. 

Our wedding was beautiful and impres- 
sive. My gown was gorgeous antique ivory 
Skinner's satin in a semi-off-the-shoulder 
model, with antique lace bertha and a net 
yoke. My finger-tip veil fell from a 
Juliet cap trimmed with white forget-me- 
nots. Elbow-length gloves and a single- 
strand pearl necklace completed my 
ensemble. 

The gifts which the Bride and Groom 
producers showered on Dick and me were 
fabulous. For our honeymoon, Dick and I 
went to that dream place of all newlyweds, 
Niagara Falls. For a whole week we rev- 
elled in the luxurious accommodations, 

Now we've settled down in our little 
home in Brookline. For the time being 
I'm back at work as a secretary, but I still 
find time to keep house and cook. 

I don't believe I'll continue working too 
long, though. Dick and I both want to 
have a family — a big family. I'd like to 
have a couple of boys who look like Dick, 
and he says he wants a couple of girls 
who look like me. 

Meanwhile, though, I'm enjoying my 
busy career-gal-housewife routine. Each 
day Dick and I hurry home from work and 
fix dinner. I cook New England style, and 
Dick is trying to teach me to make some of 
his favorite Texas dishes . . . mostly steak! 
Dishwashing is a joint enterprise, too, and 
so is housework. 

Even shopping we do together, and the 
women still cast admiring glances at my 
handsome husband every time we enter 
the grocery store. But I'm not jealous, 
even when he smiles pleasantly at them. 
I know I'm the one he loves — I'm the one 
he married! 






i 









VERY PEACHY 

(Continued from page 55) 

PASTRY 

1 cup sifted flour 3 tablespoons cold 
% teaspoon salt water, about 

1/3 cup shortening 
Measure flour and salt into a bowl. Cut 
in shortening using a pastry blender or 
2 knives, until mixture resembles coarse 
cornmeal. Sprinkle cold water over mix- 
ture. Blend lightly with fork until pastry 
forms a ball, leaving sides of bowl clean. 
Roll into circle Vg inch thick on lightly 
floured board. Cut pastry into circle % 
inch less in diameter than baking dish 
used for peaches. Cut pastry into 5 wedge 
shaped pieces. Prick wedges with fork. 
Place wedges on baking sheet. Bake in 
hot oven (450°F.) about 10 minutes, or 
until lightly browned. Place pastry over 
baked peach filling before serving. Gar- 
nish with whipped cream and blueberries. 

PEACH BAVARIAN CREAM 

Makes about 6 servings 

1 tablespoon gelatine % cup sugar 

2 tablespoons cold % teaspoon salt 
water 1 cup heavy cream 

4 fresh peaches, 1 tablespoon 

peeled and chopped lemon juice 

Soften gelatine in cold water. Place over 
boiling water and stir until dissolved. Add 
chopped peaches, lemon juice, sugar and 
salt. Mix thoroughly. Chill. When almost 
set, fold in whipped cream; chill. Serve 
in sherbet glasses. Garnish with nuts. 



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ON BEING A PERSON 



(Continued from page 41) but we cer- 
tainly don't want to copy the poor dears! 
The first step to popularity then is liking 
people. And the perfect example of this 
is my husband. He likes people. He enjoys 
them. They can feel that he likes them. I 
remember walking with Leo on Park Ave- 
nue one day when a young man stopped 
Leo and introduced himself. He said that 
he didn't want to intrude on Leo's time, 
but if Leo could possibly stop by the hos- 
pital where the young man's father was 
seriously ill, the young man felt it would 
do his father a world of good. The next 
day Leo went in and talked to the boy's 
father. Leo genuinely liked him, too, and 
as a result when Leo needs friends he has 
them. 

Just learn to think more of other people 
than you do of yourself and you've tucked 
rule number one away. Right now is the 
time to explain to yourself that shyness 
is natural to everyone. But when shyness 
interferes with your making friends, it is 
a form of selfishness. You are using it as an 
excuse. Here are some practical hints that 
I can pass on to you. I've watched others 
use them. 

As an example we will use Gail Patrick 
Jackson. She was an actress and now runs 
a darling children's shop in Beverly Hills. 
She is married to a successful advertising 
executive and is one of the most charming 
hostesses in all of California. I know be- 
cause I've been her guest innumerable 
times. Whenever she enters a room full 
of people she greets those she knows and 
then plunges into the really difficult part 
— introduces herself to those she doesn't 
know. You can do it, too, once you see how 
successful you can be. Who knows, perhaps 
you'll meet the dreamboat of all times just 
by extending your hand in friendly greet- 
ing. 

Don't hesitate to ask help when you 
need it from those you trust. When I was 
approached to do a TV show, I was frankly 
frightened of the idea. I'd never appeared 
in public as Laraine Day. Always I was an 
actress playing a part. So I started my 
first shows with people I knew very well. 
They helped me get over my first hurdle, 
and gave me the chance to achieve success 
and self-confidence. Then I found myself 
able to cope with strangers. 

At first I was timid about asking di- 



rectly what a stranger did or was interested 
in. But I found it was really easy. Remem- 
ber that the other fellow wants to make a 
good impression on you, and usually the 
things nearest and dearest to his heart 
make the easiest conversational pegs. I 
found that nearly everyone was interested 
in baseball so I had a conversational handle 
and once I grabbed that, I was in. 

This goes hand in hand with listening 
intelligently. The perfect example of that 
is the motion picture actor. The first thing 
you learn in dramatics is how to listen 
because your reaction to the other actor's 
lines is what counts in dramatics. It takes 
time for you to give up the habit of con- 
sidering yourself first and your partner 
in conversation second, but once this is 
reversed, you've won. Your confidence in 
the person speaking makes him think he's 
great and isn't that what we're after? 

Don't be afraid to express an honest 
opinion — but do be tolerant of the other 
person, too. Remember we live with all 
sorts of people. For instance, in our house- 
hold our daughter, Michele, isn't interested 
in baseball. She prefers concerts, chil- 
dren's plays, her ballet lessons, music. On 
the other hand, Chris, our son, is not the 
least bit excited about anything except 
sports, and particularly baseball. He's in 
heaven when he gets into his uniform (a 
small-scale version of my husband's Giant 
uniform number 7) and sits on the Giants' 
bench. 

Here's one very nice thing about per- 
sonality — it has little to do with being 
beautiful. Some of the women to whom 
we'd never think of giving a beauty prize 
are the ones we admire most. But there's 
one thing they all have — -good grooming. 
And every woman can, with effort, have it. 

You'll find that life's fun, too, if you 
develop a variety of interests. For example 
if you can draw a little, show your talent 
to advantage by making gay party invita- 
tions or birthday greetings. Not long ago 
I took up weaving as a hobby, and I can't 
tell you what pleasure I get from making 
stoles, rugs, other gifts for my friends. 
After all, things like that are a little bit 
of you and your time that you're sharing 
with others. 

And that brings us right back to rule 
number one. So, be yourself — but your 
very best self, remember — and have fun! 



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HERE'S MARY 
MARGARET 



(Continued from page 31) were almost 
always at his own request. His secretary 
would call Mary Margaret: "The Little 
Flower has something to say on Tues- 
day? Can it be arranged?" 

Always with an urgent message for New 
Yorkers, the small and fiery mayor would 
arrive at the studio without having given 
Mary Margaret an inkling of what was on 
his mind. "Mary," he'd say when they 
went on the air — she was always Mary to 
him, never Mary Margaret, "I think the 
people of New York ought to know about 
this!" Then he'd launch an impassioned 
plea for attention to some civic problem. 
Once it was for a personal cause. 

"Mary, it's that house they've given me. 
It stinks!" 



During his second term in office, the 
City of New York had bought an 
historical mansion as official residence for 
its mayor. "Oh, you mean Gracie Man- 
sion?" Mary Margaret asked. 

"That's what they call it," he answered. 
"And they expect me to live in it. But I 
tell you, it stinks! The rugs haven't been 
cleaned. There's grease all over. My wife 
can't cook a meal, the kitchen's so filthy. 
It hasn't even been painted. Now, Mary, I 
don't think the people of New York want 
their mayor living in a place like that!" 

As a result of the broadcast, a group 
of women formed a citizens' committee 
for the purpose of renovating Gracie 
Mansion. What probably would have taken 
months of snail-like legislation was accom- 
plished in only two weeks. 

Much as it annoys Mary Margaret to be 
called a commentator, it annoys Stella 
Karn even more to hear Mary Margaret 
referred to as a phenomenon. 

"She has tremendous ability," says 
Stella, "and she's a hard worker. Where's 
the phenomenon? I've known Mary Mar- 
garet for thirty years and I always knew 
she was going far. There was never a time 
when I or anyone else thought differently. 
Even as a youngster, she had a respect 
for work. And she gets a great deal of 
pleasure out of it. What's more, I don't 
think she's changed much in the years 
I've known her. I always say to her, 'Mary 
Margaret, they can take you away from 
the country, but they can't take the coun- 
try away from you.' " 

Life for Mary Margaret began on a 
farm in Paris, Missouri, November 16, 
1899. Her father, Walker McBride, was 
of Irish descent and known as one of 
the best farmers and traders in Monroe 
County. Her mother, Elizabeth Craig, 
whose Scotch ancestors had been in 
America since the Revolutionary War, 
was the typical, tireless farm woman of 
that era. For her, the word leisure had no 
meaning. The rooster's crow at four was 
her alarm clock and her day began with 
the building of the fire, the feeding of the 
chickens and the preparation of enor- 
mous breakfasts for her husband, children 
— Tommy. Mary Margaret and later, 
Buford, Milton and Boone. Sweeping, 
churning, bathing the babies, preserving, 
baking, sewing, gardening — this was her 






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routine. It never varied the seven days of 
the week except for Sunday church-going. 

Religion was important to the McBrides. 
Grandpa Craig, Mary Margaret's beloved 
"Pa," was a Baptist preacher who served 
the little prairie churches without regard 
for personal reward. Sometimes he took 
his granddaughter on his rounds. Memories 
of sitting with Pa in the rickety carriage 
behind the mare, Bess, are precious to 
Mary Margaret. Pa was her confidant, her 
inspiration and the first to recognize that 
the bright-eyed little girl was destined for 
a life beyond the farm. 

"You'll be famous some day, Daught," 
he'd say. 

"Really famous?" she'd ask, wriggling 
with delight. 

"Yes, Daught, really famous." 

As difficult as life was for the wives 
and mothers of those days, it couldn't 
help but be a happy one for the young. 
Mary Margaret and Tommy, close in age 
and allies in mischief, knew every honest 
excitement that farm life affords. Under 
the great oak was the swing whose swift 
flights revealed vistas of golden fields. 
There were the journeys with Papa to the 
sheep in the salt pasture. There was the 
smelly, ill-tempered goat, Oscar, that Mary 
Margaret and Tommy nevertheless adored. 
There were popcorn parties around a great 
fire. Best of all, there were the splendid 
tables set by Mama. 

"When I first came to New York," says 
Mary Margaret, "I hated the food. It's a 
wonder I didn't turn thin! The chicken 
wasn't fit to eat and the mashed potatoes 
were full of lumps. How I used to long 
for my mother's meals. She and my aunts 
were the best cooks in Monroe County." 

The produce of that fertile county over- 
flowed on the McBrides' table: thick 
slices of fried ham with rich, red gravy; 
enormous Ponderosa tomatoes; crisp 
brown baby chicken; hand-beaten mashed 
potatoes which Mary Margaret describes 
as "fluffy as a cloud;" potato soup heavy 
with cream and onions; cabbage pudding; 
fresh country sausage; and the magnifi- 
cent creations from Mama's oven — bis- 
cuits, rolls, Southern corn bread, choc- 
olate blanc mange, thick pies oozing 
golden juices. Little wonder that Mary 
Margaret's New York diet seemed pallid! 



All through Mary Margaret's girl- 
hood, New York and the dream of 
becoming a great writer were part of her 
conscious desires. A reading child, she ab- 
sorbed all the primers in the one-room 
schoolhouse before most of her contempo- 
raries could even decipher the printed 
word, raced through the juvenile classics, 
and sat for many happy hours thumbing 
through piles of old magazines in her 
aunt's attic. 

At eleven, Mary Margaret went away 
to the boarding school which had been 
founded by her uncle and which to this 
day bears his name, the William Woods 
College. It was her aunt's fondest hope 
that Mary Margaret would someday as- 
sume the role of "lady principal" in this 
school. To this end, the wealthy Mrs. 
Woods was willing to train her niece. She 
was even willing to pay Mary Margaret's 
expenses at the University of Missouri. 
But at the end of her first year at the 
University, Mary Margaret, clinging to 
her original aspiration, shocked her aunt 



by telling her that she had no intention 
of becoming the "lady principal" of 
William Woods College. 

"If you don't do what I tell you," 
stormed Mrs. Woods, "I won't give you 
anything!" 

The threat did not daunt Mary Mar- 
garet. She worked for a year on the 
Mexico, Missouri, Ledger — "I did every- 
thing on that paper except set the type" 
— and then went back to Columbia for 
another year-and-a-half at the University. 
She took as many courses as possible a 
term and attended summer sessions, thus 
getting her journalism degree in a total 
of two-and-a-half years. Such a schedule 
may have been possible for any brilliant 
girl, but, cut off from her aunt's support, 
Mary Margaret had to earn her own way. 
She solved this by doing part-time 
work for the Columbia Times. Often 
she worked nights. If she was paid, she 
ate. And getting paid depended on the 
amount of copy she supplied. A big 
source of her copy was a little delicates- 
sen store run by a German woman. There 
the ladies of Columbia ordered their 
luncheon rolls or party ice cream or 
company salads. By finding out who had 
ordered what, Mary Margaret was able 
to get leads on social functions for the 
paper. 



The little woman who owned the 
store played another important role. 
Sensing that Mary Margaret wasn't get- 
ting enough to eat, she'd say, "Mary Mar- 
garet, here's some chicken salad that was 
never picked up. If you don't take it, it'll 
go to waste." There was always an excuse 
to press Mary Margaret with food and the 
way the woman did it never offended Mary 
Margaret's youthful pride. 

In 1940, when the University gave Mary 
Margaret its annual award for achieve- 
ment in journalism, the delicatessen 
owner was present in the scholarly hall. 
She remembered Mary Margaret and 
asked to be there for the presentation. 
Unable to leave New York, Mary Mar- 
garet accepted the award over a special 
hook-up with the University, and paid 
special tribute to the proud little woman 
who helped her to get through college. 

After graduation, Mary Margaret had 
no difficulty at all in achieving her imme- 
diate goal. Every year, the editor of the 
Cleveland Press picked the prize graduate 
from the Missouri journalism school for 
a cub reporter's job on his paper. Mary 
Margaret was it. 

As is standard newspaper procedure, 
Cub Reporter McBride was allowed to 
cover only those beats which more ex- 
perienced reporters hate to be bothered 
with. But when Mary Margaret turned in 
a lengthy, enthusiastic, and finely detailed 
story of what under any other cub's cov- 
erage would have been a brief notice of a 
Baptist Church convention, the editor rec- 
ognized its merits and printed it in full. 
Nor was he the only one impressed by it. 
No less a personage than John D. Rocke- 
feller, Sr., indisputably the world's richest 
Baptist, read the story and brought it to 
the attention of the Interchurch World 
Movement in New York. 

"Who's the lady who wrote such a fine 
story on the convention?" he wanted to 
know. Officers of the Movement were 
quick to find out. They offered the lady a 



job writing publicity at the New York 
office. Mary Margaret, her dream realized 
sooner than she'd expected, didn't have 
to be asked twice. She arrived in New 
York in 1924. 

The Interchurch World Movement was 
not destined to last long. But its impor- 
tance in the life of Mary Margaret Mc- 
Bride was great. There at the Movement 
she met Estella Karn. 

Stella, who'd come from the South, was 
young, eager and ambitious, and she, too, 
was determined to conquer the big city. 
It was natural that she and the new copy- 
writer should become friends. 

"She was sitting in the press room," 
says Stella, remembering her first sight 
of Mary Margaret. "And press rooms — 
'even religious press rooms — can be pretty 
dingy places. It was noisy and dirty and 
cloudy with cigarette smoke, but Mary 
Margaret sat at her typewriter, pounding 
away, ignoring everything except the 
paper in her machine. I thought to myself, 
My God, there's a studious gal." 

In those days, Stella teased Mary Mar- 
garet by calling her a white ribboner 
because she was strong for temperance. 

"She still is," says Stella. "She won't 
accept liquor or cigarette ads on her show. 
But she's gotten over some of her early 
extremes. Three of us had an apartment 
in the Village and I came home once to 
find her shaking some peaches over the 
drain. They were brandied peaches which 
I'd bought to impress the boys who were 
coming. She certainly spoiled that idea." 

Greenwich Village in the Twenties was, 
as Mary Margaret puts it, "like a nice 
little country town where you were trusted 
at the corner grocer and where the iceman 
would take the mice out of the traps." 
Young people could live cheaply while 
trying to launch their careers, and it 
was exciting, too, for you never knew 
when you were going to catch a glimpse 
of one of your idols in the streets. To 
read an Edna St. Vincent Millay sonnet 
one day and to encounter her in the 
oakery shop the next was a great event 
to impressionable, literary-minded young- 
sters. 



And impressionable Mary Margaret 
certainly was. New York, for her, 
even exceeded expectations, and being poor 
didn't stand in the way of having fun. 
She and Stella and their roommate, Hor- 
tense, were much too bright and resource- 
ful to let the lack of money limit them. 
Food, the ever-present problem, was par- 
tially solved by the creation of a dish 
which they called "Chaos." 

"Chaos," Mary Margaret recalls, "us- 
ually had a corn or tamale base which 
we'd flavor with tomato sauce. Then we'd 
add to it whatever we had around. It 
rarely tasted the same twice! We'd make 
it in individual casseroles and — " 

"We never owned any casseroles," Stella 
is quick to remind her. 

"Well, it was the same thing. Any odd 
dish that could go into the oven was used. 
There was one for everybody." 

"Sometimes there wasn't," says Stella. 
"One evening two cousins of Hortense 
came unexpectedly. We'd already invited 
other guests so I said, 'Mary Margaret, 
you'll have to go to bed. There simply 
isn't enough Chaos.' She was furious! 
Hortense and I told everybody that she 



was ill, and there we sat commiserating 
on poor Mary Margaret at the very mo- 
ment she came bumping up the steps, 
rustling a paper bag full of food she'd 
gone out to buy. From where we sat we 
could hear her steps from the stairway 
to the bedroom, and they certainly didn't 
sound like those of the deathly ill girl 
we'd pictured to our guests." 

Inventive as they were, the girls, espe- 
cially Stella, now and then succumbed 
to store delicacies that wreaked havoc 
with the budget. Hortense would come 
to Mary Margaret and say, "Look at 
my shoes. How am I going to get money 
for new ones if Stella spends it all on 
pate de foi gras and peaches in glass?" 

Hortense once had an even more valid 
complaint against her roommates. 

"We desperately needed an icebox," 
Mary Margaret recalls, "and when Hor- 
tense's suitor asked us what she wanted 
for her birthday, Stella and I said, 'An 
icebox! She wants an icebox more than 
anything!' You should have seen Hortense 
when the icebox arrived. She'd been hint- 
ing for a jade necklace." 



When the Interchurch World Move- 
ment disbanded, Mary Margaret 
heard that the New York Evening Mail 
wanted a girl who could cover fires dra- 
matically. She flew down to the city room, 
got the job, but never expected she'd have 
a chance to cover a fire, however dramat- 
ically. But, sure enough, the next week 
there was a fine fire in the Bronx. 

"I tried my best to be dramatic," says 
Mary Margaret, "but I didn't think my 
story would get much space in the paper. 
I remember stopping with Stella at a 
newsstand on the corner of Sixth Avenue 
and Forty-Second Street. We looked all 
through the Evening Mail. No story. Then 
we spotted it on the front page. And there 
was my big, black by-line. I didn't come 
down to earth for days after that." 

Writing for the newspapers was not 
Mary Margaret's ultimate aim. One day 
while she was sitting at her desk grinding 
out a feature story, the awful possibility 
that she was never going to become a 
great writer occurred to her. 

"I nearly had a nervous breakdown on 
the spot," she says. 

Stella found her crying in front of a 
Western Union office on Seventh Avenue 
that very evening. 

"What's the matter with you?" she de- 
manded. 

"I'm going back to Paris, Missouri," 
she sobbed. "I'm sending my mother a 
telegram." 

"Now, look . . ." said Stella. She led 
Mary Margaret into the nearest Schrafft's, 
ordered something smothered with 
whipped cream, nuts and chocolate fudge, 
and convinced her that she should stay on. 

Sometime later the same feeling of 
desolation came over her. She fainted at 
the newspaper office. 

"That must have been the time I really 
knew I'd never become a great writer," 
says Mary Margaret. "Anyway, they got 
me home and the doctor who was called 
in recommended a sea voyage. Now, a sea 
voyage was as far out of my reach as the 
next month's rent. But Stella and Hor- 
tense decided that my health must be 
restored. They took me on a voyage all 
right — on the Sandy Hook day boat!" 



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"The sea's the sea, isn't it?" asks 
Stella. 

Later, there was a period of Europe 
every year. But she'd yet to come into that 
kind of money. Hortense left to be mar- 
ried, and Mary Margaret and Stella moved 
to a smaller walk-up in the Village. 

"We counted pennies and sometimes we 
didn't even have those," says Mary Mar- 
garet. "There was a time when we were 
so broke that it was a major tragedy when 
cookie tins didn't have the number in 
we'd counted on. Cocoanut Dainties were 
especially irregular, I remember. But there 
was always Chaos. And we usually man- 
aged to have hearts of lettuce. Often we 
budgeted meals down to twenty cents." 

Mary Margaret read as much as she 
could in her spare time and worked hard 
on the job. She knew her career was 
progressing nicely when the Evening Mail 
put her under contract. She became its 
chief feature writer, doing a page three 
story every day. But when the Mail was 
sold to the Globe, with most of the women 
writers dismissed and Mary Margaret's 
being offered the chance to do religious 
features only, she told the editor she 
didn't want the job. 

"I want to write," she announced. 

"Why don't you?" he asked, not un- 
kindly. 

Then Stella, who was managing Paul 
Whiteman, persuaded Mary Margaret to 
write a book with Paul on the music which 
gave its name to that era. "Jazz, The Story 
of Paul Whiteman," was bought by the 
Saturday Evening Post. 

"To me, that seemed like the most 
magical thing in the world," says Mary 
Margaret. "The Post ranked with the 
Bible and the Sears, Roebuck catalogue 
where I came from. To have my first 
stuff in it was like a dream." 

Next she discovered the women's maga- 
zines. It was a lucrative discovery. Until 
the early 1930's, the name Mary Margaret 
McBride appeared over stories in almost 
every important publication. She became 
the highest paid woman magazine writer 
in the country. And in collaboration with 
Helen Josephy, she wrote a series of best- 
selling travel books. 



There was money for everything then. 
Mary Margaret fulfilled a long- 
standing ambition by taking her mother on 
a tour of Europe. Stella, by some judicious 
speculating in the stock market, managed 
to make two years' rent in two days' time. 
This was used to get the luxurious apart- 
ment they'd been coveting. 

"If ever I had a period of going out a 
lot, that was it," says Mary Margaret. 

"But an awful lot of the nice men I met 
were married. Besides, I was still career- 
bound and fiercely ambitious." 

When Mary Margaret was in college, 
there was a young man, a medical stu- 
dent. They were very much in love. One 
soft spring evening after the Easter holi- 
days, he'd proposed. 

"As much as I loved him," Mary Mar- 
garet says, "I can remember thinking to 
myself, 'I'll never marry you. I'm going 
to New York and become a great writer.' 
Once, after I'd been in New York, I did 
go back to see him. We met in Kansas 
City but it just wouldn't work out." 

Other men sought pretty young Mary 
Margaret McBride, but she was never able 



to relinquish the idea of a career. 

"Edna Ferber and I talked about that 
once when she was on my program," 
says Mary Margaret. "She said people 
always asked her why she had never 
married. She doesn't regret it. She feels 
she was kind of born for work and that 
work had been enough. My dream of 
writing was like that. I always wanted 
scoops. I always wanted my by-lines to be 
in the biggest, boldest, blackest type pos- 
sible. I'd actually suffer if someone did a 
story I thought / should have thought of. 

"I'd call that having too much ambition. 
And that can be deadly. Ambition should 
be tempered with reason. Then you have 
more self-assurance and a defense against 
your sufferings. But I suppose I'll always 
be a sufferer." 



Mary Margaret McBride as a suf- 
ferer is a possibility that probably 
has never occurred to those who think of 
her as a warm, winning woman whose very 
appearance of serenity can invest others 
with that quality. But Mary Margaret, 
as every other mortal, is not entirely 
free from fears and insecurities. 

"If I have a good show, I'm walking on 
air," she says. "But let me hear it on 
record and all the glow is gone. My rea- 
soning tells me that I could not have 
remained on the air for seventeen years 
without being good, but I really cannot 
believe it. I don't feel that I ever measure 
up to the standards I set. I fear people 
will find out that I'm not really as good as 
they think I am. That's why hearing those 
records nearly makes me lose my mind." 

Poisen pen letters have the same effect. 
Mary Margaret claims she can repeat 
verbatim every one she's received, and 
that one bad letter can wipe out the satis- 
faction of a thousand good ones. 

The good letters, however, helped 
Mary Margaret achieve the kind of radio 
program she thought the women of Amer- 
ica would like. By 1934 the high-paying 
magazine market had vanished. Mary Mar- 
garet still received assignments, but the 
checks were slim for one who'd collected 
some of the fattest in the field. When 
Station WOR auditioned people for a new 
woman's program, Mary Margaret was 
invited to try out. 

"I think she got the job because she 
didn't mention money," says Stella. 

The broadcasting company barely men- 
tioned it, either. Mary Margaret McBride, 
radio novice, received twenty-five dollars 
per week for six hours of programs. 

What the station had in mind was a 
half-hour of household hints with a little 
grandmotherly advice thrown in between 
information on how to make last year's 
draperies into this year's dress. Mary Mar- 
garet, as Martha Deane, cheerfully in- 
vented a family for herself, played the 
role of grandma with great gusto — and 
tired of it within a few weeks. 

"Listen," she told her audience, "I am 
now going to kill off my family. Radio 
is fun but all this stuff they ask me to 
say is a lot of rot. I'm a reporter and I 
think you'd like to hear about things that 
actually happen." 

She then described a flea circus she'd 
seen the night before and on successive 
programs talked about everything she'd 
seen, done, or eaten. Listeners were de- 
lighted. They wrote letters to the station. 



Needless to say, Mary Margaret's fake 
family was never resurrected. 

Mary Margaret, by giving her listen- 
ers intimate conversations with all kinds 
of "doing" people, helps broaden their 
horizons and gives them a more vivid sense 
of participation in the world. 

Authors are by far Mary Margaret's 
favorite guests and she reads over five 
hundred of their output every year in pur- 
suit of material for her program. Books 
line almost every wall of her Central 
Park duplex. They overflow into the foyers 
and pile up in Stella's 45th Street office. 
They are the only significant possessions 
of a woman who detests possessions. 

"I don't own a house or jewelry or a 
car," she explains. "I just can't be both- 
ered owning things." 

She does have that one symbol of suc- 
cess — the mink coat. 

"Stella made me buy it," she says. "We 
were going out to Missouri for Mary Mar- 
garet McBride Day in 1940. Stella had a 
mink of her own and she said to me, 'Look, 
you'd better get yourself one or people 
will think I take all your money.' " 

Stella, who gets a third of Mary Mar- 
garet's income, has a brief definition for 
their success. "It's based on Mary Mar- 
garet's ability and my bad disposition," 
she says, referring to the Karn talent for 
saying "no" at the right time. "But," she'll 
add, "ability is ability and you can't take 
that away from her." 

Stella occasionally has to restrain Mary 
Margaret's estimates of her own abilities. 
In 1944, at the Madison Square Garden 
celebration of her tenth anniversary on 
the air, Mary Margaret decided she 
wanted to shake hands with each and 
every comer, just as she does at the 
studio. Stella was appalled. The Garden 
was filled to capacity. Thousands had 
been turned away. 

"You'll wear yourself out," Stella 
warned. "Imagine wanting to shake hands 
with 20,000 women!" 

"But they're my friends," insisted Mary 
Margaret, "and they've come to see me." 

She soon realized the impossibility of 
her intention and gratefully allowed Stella 
to shoo her up to the platform, which was 
flanked by assorted dignitaries waiting to 
pay her tribute. 



T^rvE years later, for the celebration of 



JL' Mary Margaret's fifteenth year on 
the air, Stella made certain no such limita- 
tion as capacity would stand between Mary 
Margaret and her admirers. She hired 
Yankee Stadium with its 65,000 seats. No 
one bothered to count the empty ones, but 
it could have been done very easily — there 
were that few. The New York subway 
system ran special trains to the Stadium 
from Brooklyn and Queens. Some women, 
bound for shopping, found themselves 
caught up in the jam, but they stayed on. 
Bargains in Macy's could wait; it was 
more fun to help Mary Margaret celebrate. 
McBride admirers are all ages, possibly 
because there are qualities in Mary Mar- 
garet which seem to fit the needs of every 
age group. The younger woman sees her 
as the warm mother-confidant, tolerant, 
understanding, and brimming with life; 
to her contemporaries she is an extension 
of themselves, the woman who gets around 
and relates to them the things that chance 
confines their doing; to the older woman 



she is the good daughter, the one who has 
gone far in the world but who has never 
forgotten her own mother and the train- 
ing she received at home. 

These days Mary Margaret sees less 
of her fans than she'd like to. Most of her 
programs are broadcast from a pleasant, 
book-lined room overlooking Central Park. 
Busier than ever with her new network 
commitments, Mary Margaret finds she 
saves three hours a day by not going to 
the studio. ABC ■ sends a control man, 
and Vincent Connolly — who has been 
Mary Margaret's announcer from almost 
the beginning and to whom Mary Mar- 
garet is devoted— comes to do the hour- 
long show heard in New York. The pro- 
gram is revised for its a.m. transcription 
to Chicago, then condensed for its half- 
hour on the network. 

"Of course, my friends in the studio 
audience protest," she says, "but when I 
tell them I don't have to get into my 
corsets this way, they understand." 

Mary Margaret's corset was once 
the cause of considerable anguish 
not only to herself, but to those who were 
waiting for her to go on the air. When the 
scheduled hour came and Mary Margaret 
did not, Stella went on. 

"Probably a traffic jam," explained 
Stella to the waiting audience. 

It turned out to be more serious than 
that. The zipper on Mary Margaret's cor- 
set had jammed, catching her skin and re- 
fusing to budge. Mary Margaret's maid 
called a doctor, but his equipment was use- 
less against the stubborn zipper. 

"Call the janitor," he said to the maid, 
"and tell him to bring all his tools." 

Under pressure from various saws, files 
and pliers, the zipper gave. Mary Margaret 
forgot her pain, rushed to the studio, and 
took over for the rest of the broadcast. 

Mary Margaret's apartment is simple 
and comfortable. On the first floor is the 
studio-sitting room from which she broad- 
casts, and the kitchen — the domain of 
Myra, her maid. Upstairs is Mary Mar- 
garet's private sitting room with its plant- 
lined windows and books, books, books. 
Covering the walls of her bedroom is the 
collection of samplers which were made by 
listeners. Her favorite is the tiny square 
of linen with the dainty inscription: 
Two old friends 
And a cup of tea, 
One of them you 
And one of them me. 

Today, at fifty-one, plump and rosy, 
her unique, squared pompadour now white, 
Mary Margaret McBride begins her eight- 
eenth year of broadcasting with little more 
than fleeting regrets for not having become 
a twentieth-century Bronte. 

"It's been completely satisfying," she 
says about radio. "But I suppose TV has to 
come. Women write to me all the time 
wanting to know when I'm going on TV. 
But I don't want to be on display. I want 
to make faces and grotesque gestures when 
I feel like it. I just want to be myself." 

Mary Margaret had a brief, not en- 
tirely satisfying bout with television in 
1948. But she's game to try again. And, 
as always, she'll be giving whatever she 
attempts all her energy, enthusiasm, and 
famous capacity for hard work. 

"She'll just be Mary Margaret Mc- 
Bride," says Stella. 



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89 






Suzanne had every reason 
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BY NORA DRAKE 



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eighteen, she had seen enough suffering in 
Europe to understand that even a nurse, 
professionally trained to handle it, could 
sometimes find a routine hospital day al- 
most unendurable. She was a mature little 
person, sensitive and gentle, but there was 
power behind the gentleness which stunned 
you when it came out in the only outlet it 
had — her music. One of the best pianists 
in the world had said Suzanne had a 
talent, and had taken her for his pupil. 
They were all pleasant memories, when 
I thought about her music. But gradually 
unpleasant ones came crowding in. How 
endlessly and inextricably people are 
chained together — Suzanne to Tom Mor- 
ley, Tom to Charles Dobbs and me and 
through us to George Stewart and Dorothy, 
his wife . . . and over us all the menacing 
shadow of Big John Morley, Tom's father. 

The trouble began with Big John, 
too. When Charles, then a Special 
Prosecutor, began to compile the in- 
formation that would put Big John be- 
hind bars, he knew he was tracking down 
one of the most powerful sources of cor- 
ruption the city had ever known. We all 
knew — Charles and I and his other friends 
— that it was a dangerous assignment; no 
attempt to expose Big John had ever yet 
been carried through to a conclusion. But 
Charles had no doubt of his ultimate suc- 
cess — and unfortunately neither did Big 
John Morley. Perhaps he had decided his 
time had run out — perhaps it was the 
effect of having his son Tom out of col- 
lege, ready to make a beginning in the 
world. Morley must have thought a great 
deal about just what kind of a beginning 
Tom could make, with his father's record 
and name neatly fencing him off from re- 
spectable people. That he loved his son 
there was no doubt; in fact as Charles 
learned more of Morley's life and charac- 
ter he realized that between Big John and 
his son there was an unusually strong af- 
fection. Did Big John decide that if he 
were out of the way Tom would have a 
better chance? Was it an accident? No- 
body had the answers, except Tom Morley. 
When on the verge of his indictment Big 
John Morley went out in a boat and was 
drowned., Tom Morley accused Charles of 
having killed his father. 

He couldn't, naturally, make a formal 
accusation of murder. But, wild with grief 
and hysteria, Tom held Charles guilty of 
having unjustly persecuted Big John until 
death was the only way out. And because 
I was with Charles on that dreadful grey 
day when we tried to keep Morley from 
going out in the boat, Tom turned his 
hatred on me as well. That was how he 
and Suzanne met — when he came and told 
me that somehow, he didn't yet know how, 
he was going to make Charles and me pay 
for what he believed we had done to his 
father. For all the youthful melodrama of 
his threat, it was nonetheless ominous — 
partly because hatred was working down 
into Tom himself to twist a decent, pleas- 
ant boy into something not quite sane. 
Before I had rather liked Tom, but now 
he frightened me. I was- relieved when 
several months went by with no further 
contact between us. 

Suzanne asked about him once or twice, 
for he had frightened and intrigued her 
too. But in normal people hysteria doesn't 
last forever; I was sure that time and 



travel had softened the grief of losing his 
father, and that Tom was beginning the 
good life I suspected Big John had died 
to give him. So it was a shock when 
Charles told me bitterly that Tom was 
making good his threat. Working with a 
cold persistence, Tom had found the key 
with which he planned to unlock all sorts 
of trouble for Charles. He found it in his 
father's office safe — a check signed by 
George Stewart, Charles's brother, which 
Tom said that he could prove was a 
forgery. 

A Special Prosecutor cannot have a 
brother under suspicion of forgery. Tom's 
plan moved smoothly right from the start, 
for Charles felt he had to resign. He began 
at once to set up a defense for George, 
but I saw him growing more harassed as 
his hopes for a good case weakened. Tom 
held all the cards — the check, the proof, 
and worst of all George's past history, 
which had sometimes taken him close to 
the line between legal and illegal activi- 
ties. The fact that he had been working 
for Big John Morley was enough to damn 
him in the eyes of any intelligent jury. 

And the worst of it was that George 
wasn't really guilty of the forgery. Every- 
body knew it — the dreadful thing was that 
only Tom could prove it. In all our faces 
he flaunted his power, even going to the 
trouble of coming up to our apartment one 
night to make it perfectly plain that if he 
chose to he could save George. 

He came in and sat down as nonchalant- 
ly as though we were all good friends, he 
and Suzanne and I. "Dorothy Stewart is 
simply wild, you know," he said, looking 
pleasantly from me to Suzanne. "She knows 
my father tricked George into signing 
that check, and Dobbs knows it too — and 
they can't do a thing." 

With an effort I kept expression off my 
face, but Suzanne didn't even try. "You're 
unbelievable," she said. "You're the most 
contemptible creature I've ever known." 

Tom looked her up and down. "You're 
so young, Miss Turrie — you haven't really 
known so many people, now have you? 
You're really very naive. You must be, be- 
cause you've swallowed Miss Drake and 
Mr. Dobbs so thoroughly. They sound 
noble, therefore they must be noble. Such 
faith! And to think I have to come along 
and destroy it! Destroy it because it's 
built on a lie, because two people capable 
of hounding a man like my father to death 
mustn't be allowed to parade their hy- 
pocrisy around without some punishment!" 

Suzanne said fiercely, "It's you, you 
who are naive. Stupid and vicious! 
Why don't you face the fact that your 
father was a criminal?" 

"Suzanne," I intervened, "that's quite 
useless. Tom will have to arrive at the 
truth in his own time and manner." I was 
frankly a little frightened at the chalky 
fury that came into his face when she 
called his father a criminal. If there was 
any madness in Tom, that was its testing 
point — he had never been able to accept 
the truth about Big John Morley. 

Bitterly though they had fought, Tom 
seemed to find some stimulation in 
Suzanne's contempt that he couldn't re- 
sist. Perhaps it was the simple, spontane- 
ous unleashing of anger that he enjoyed 
parrying, for the rest of us had long ago 
given up all hope of making an impres' 



. 



sion on him by anger — or in fact in any 
other way. But Suzanne had lashed out at 
him, and Tom liked it so much he came 
back for more. She was more wary the sec- 
ond time, and I could Jell when he left that 
he was disappointed at not having pro- 
voked her to anger. She simply treated 
him like an unwelcome salesman, and after 
about ten minutes he couldn't stand it any 
more. I had been surprised at that second 
visit; but then, a week later, he suddenly 
rang the doorbell again. He seemed as 
surprised to find himself there as I was. 
Only Suzanne appeared undisturbed, and 
continued playing her Chopin prelude as 
though nobody had entered the room. 

Tom glanced at Suzanne, but spoke 
softly to me. "I hope you don't mind 
enough to throw me out," he said. "I 
thought I'd stop in and see how you 
were." 

"We're quite well." I spoke shortly and 
coldly, my hand still on the door. But 
when his eyes met mine, I let go the door- 
knob almost involuntarily. Once, long ago, 
Tom had come with his father to a hospital 
board meeting, and everyone had judged 
him to be a nice, eager, intelligent boy. 
Now for the first time in months I saw that 
boy again, his blue eyes troubled but free 
of malice, his face pale and strained, but 
showing no sneer. I was shaken, because 
you couldn't loathe this Tom Morley. You 
could only feel terribly sorry for him. I 
let him come into the room, where he sat 
quietly until Suzanne finished playing. 

When she took her hands from the key- 
board nobody spoke. Then Tom said, 
"That was tremendous. I didn't know you 
could play like that." 

Suzanne gave him a direct look. "Why 
should you know anything at all about 
me? I don't fit anywhere into your inter- 
esting schemes of trouble-making." 

"And you don't like me talking about 
your music, do you? I couldn't possibly 
know what I was talking about." 

I was rather proud of the almost amia- 
ble look Suzanne turned on him. She said, 
"I couldn't possibly care what you were 
talking about, Mr. Morley. I know as 
much about you as I care to when I know 
that Nora is unhappy because of you, that 
Charles's legal career may suffer a setback 
because of you, and that George Stewart 
may spend years in prison for a crime he 
didn't commit — because of you." 

As Tom Morley stood up, I saw Su- 



zanne's expression change. He looked at 
her for a minute, and then he said, "Will 
you come out for a walk with me?" 

"Yes," she said instantly. "I will." It 
was over in a second — the challenge given 
and received. I was baffled by the feeling 
that though I saw and heard everything, I 
didn't really know what was going on. 
They had met only a handful of times; it 
seemed to me that they couldn't know one 
another well enough for this emotion to 
have spun itself between them. It's very 
often that in the space between one 
breath and another two people can fall in 
love. 

But it was a long time before the truth 
got home to me. It seemed impossible — 
Suzanne and Tom Morley, who in just a 
few weeks was going to do his best to bring 
unhappiness into the lives of her best 
friends. I suppose it was a long time be- 
fore Suzanne herself admitted it. Suzanne 
didn't deliberately conceal anything, but 
I think she was so perplexed by it all — not 
only the situation between herself and 
Tom, but the incredible fact that there was 
any situation at all. She really feared him 
at first, as one fears anything unknow- 
able. But sometimes the mystery dissolved. 
She did begin to understand him. And 
after that she couldn't hate or fear him 
any more. 

I was rather dimly aware that something 
was going on. Suzanne never went out 
much, but after that walk with Tom there 
were suddenly dates during the week — just 
odd hours when she would disappear in her 
around-the-house clothes with a scarf to 
tie over her hair. I imagine they spent 
those hours walking around the city, but 
I don't really know. All I am sure of is 
that there was a definite line between the 
old Suzanne and the new. 

There was less music around the apart- 
ment, suddenly. She would begin to play, 
break off in the middle of a phrase and 
disappear into her room. One after- 
noon she returned in te_afs from a lesson 
with Durosha and I guess that his accurate 
ear had caught some fumbling in her play- 
ing. That would explain the tears, for Du- 
rosha was merciless in his anger when he 
thought a protege of his was doing less 
than his or her best. I thought surely 
Suzanne would break down and talk to me 
then, but she only stared at me, the tears 
sliding helplessly down, and then ran to 
her room. 



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There was more practicing after that, 
and almost a return to the old, quietly 
happy Suzanne. Except that she wasn't 
happy. When the phone rang she was al- 
ways right there, but she made no secret of 
the fact that when it was for her it was 
usually Tom. I think she wanted me to 
know. But by that time I was afraid of 
what she might tell me, so I waited. 

The date of George's trial came closer 
and closer, and Suzanne grew increasingly 
nervous. Then one Saturday morning, when 
neither of us had the excuse of work to 
take us away from the breakfast table, she 
looked at me with desperate determination 
in her eyes. "You must help me think, 
Nora," she said. "I'm in love with Tom 
Morley, you know. And yet I can't be in 
love with someone I can't respect." She 
laid it before me as though those few words 
had given me all the knewledge I needed 
to solve the problem! 

I asked, "Do you want to tell me about 
it? I know you've been seeing him." 

Suzanne frowned. "That's all of it. 
I can't believe how I came to let 
myself in for such a thing — with both of us 
really hating one another. We understood 
that it wasn't hate but something else. 
And now I don't know what to do with it. 
I can't stop seeing him. I've tried. He's 
already too important." 

"Then what's the problem, Suzanne? 
With most people it's the question Am I, 
or Am I Not, that causes the trouble. You 
seem to have worked out your answer. 

"What's the problem?" 

"Weren't you listening, Nora? How can 
I love him when he's still as insane as ever 
about you and Charles? He hasn't stopped 
praying that he'll find ways to make you 
suffer for his father's death. How can I 
love a man who has such a bitter loathing 
of the two people who are my dearest . . ." 
Her voice shook, and she stopped. I said 
nothing, appalled at the intensity of emo- 
tion she had carried around inside her for 
so many weeks. Appalled too at my own 
helplessness . . . for she asked a question I 
didn't dare to answer. To myself I said 
You can love a man you can't respect. Not 
forever, perhaps, but for long enough to 
learn just how much self-deception and 
shame you're capable of suffering. And 
it's a kind of love I pray you'll be spared. 

"It's his father," Suzanne was saying. 
"That's his dreadful blind spot. He can be 
so wonderful, Nora. If only there were 
some way to divorce him from the memory 
of that wicked man. Something he had to 
see, something he couldn't call a lie as he 
does everything you have told him . . ." 

Suddenly I remembered it — the brown 
manila envelope. The innocent-looking en- 
velope that held all the dynamite Charles 
would have needed to blow the kingdom of 
Big John Morley into a million bits and 
pieces. Where was it now — lying uselessly 
in Charles's safe, perhaps? Or no — he had 
given it to Dorothy long ago to see if she 
couldn't persuade Tom to read through 
what was in it. Long ago — before Suzanne 
was in the picture at all; and that was why 
I had forgotten it. When Dorothy failed, 
as Charles and I had failed, we put the 
envelope away and out of our minds. 

But Suzanne was in the picture now. 
I told her about the envelope, and what 
was in it — details, dates, names, places, 
proof beyond question that Big John Mor- 



. 



ley had stopped at nothing short of mur 
der in his greed for power and money 

"But that's it!" she said. "So far it's 
been words, all words! If this is what you 
say, Nora, he must admit it. He can't shrug 
away a fact by calling it a lie." 

"He can refuse to read it," I reminded 
her. "All of us tried once before to show it 
to him. But he wouldn't touch it." 

"I can," she said. "He'll read it if I take 
it to him. He knows I want nothing but 
what is right for him. . . Oh, he'll read it 
now, Nora. This is all we need!" 

On the verge of warning her that it 
might not be quite so simple, I held back. 
Stranger things had happened! The mere 
falling in love of Tom and Suzanne was 
strange enough. 

On the phone, I tracked the envelope 
down at Dorothy's apartment, and ar- 
ranged for Suzanne to pick it up on her 
way to her luncheon date with Tom. A 
radiance shone from Suzanne when she 
went dashing out shortly afterwards. I 
sped her with a silent hope that all would 
go well. Then I gave myself time off to 
go shopping. 

I wasn't gone very long, so I was startled 
when I came back to see Suzanne flying 
about her room, throwing clothes on the 
bed and opening drawers with rough 
urgency. 

"What in the world?" I asked faintly. 

"Never mind. Never mind!" She came 
out of her closet and tossed her overnight 
bag on the bed. "Don't ask questions. I'm 
too young, I'm a fool, I've made a mistake. 
I want to get far away from here." 

"Where are you going? What is this?" 

"Oh, don't worry," she said. She 
straightened up and gave me a thin smile. 
"I'm not doing anything desperate. Du- 
rosha asked me last week if I'd substitute 
for Carla Monteggio, the pianist — you re- 
member, she got appendicitis. I'm only 
going down to Baltimore for tomorrow." 
Without actually looking, I saw that she 
was taking more clothes than she would 
need for one day. She tucked them 
almost furtively into the bag. "I may stay a 
couple of days. I told Durosha last week I 
didn't want to go, but he made an issue 
of it so I thought I'd better — " Our 
eyes met and with appalling abruptness 
she collapsed on the bed. 

" %W 7"hat happened?" I asked gently. 
fY "Do you want to talk about it?" 

She nodded toward her desk, where I 
saw now that the brown manila envelope 
lay unopened as the last time I had seen 
it. Nothing had happened to it. . 

"He laughed in my face, Nora. He said 
— Oh, I don't want to remember. That I 
was one of you instead of being with him. 
How I'd been sly and sneaky, how I'd only 
pretended to be falling in love with him. 
If he knew! If he had the wit and sense to 
know how I'm feeling about him!" 

There was no comfort to offer. She 
wouldn't have heard words anyway. 

Suddenly she turned on me. "It's retri- 
bution! This is what we wanted to make 
him go through — Tom. Just as my belief 
in him is shattered, we were all trying to 
shatter his belief in his father! He was 
right to defend himself!" She stood up 
swiftly and walked away from me, as if she 
couldn't bear to be near. "If this is what 
you go through when you lose faith in 
someone you love, then Tom was right to 



say or do anything to keep his faith!" 

"That's not quite the whole story, Su- 
zanne. There's George — do you think Tom 
is justified in punishing George for some- 
thing he knows George didn't do? Have 
you decided that it's' right even to hurt 
others in order to protect yourself?" 

Suzanne stared at me from strained, 
tearless eyes. "Who can help me now? 
Who can make me feel better except my- 
self? In the last analysis everyone must 
look after himself — " 

"Oh, Suzanne — this from you? After — " 
"Yes, after everything!" She pressed 
her hands over her eyes fiercely. "After all 
this I can only help myself, I can't look to 
anyone else! That's why I'm going away. 
Nobody can give me back my faith or my 
love — nobody cares enough to bother. I 
can only make myself well again . . . I'll 
be sorry about all this one day, Nora — you 
know that, don't you? I'll want to apolo- 
gize, ask you to forgive me and forget all 
these mad things I'm saying. But you'll 
have to allow me to get it out of my sys- 
tem." 

The phone shrilled, galvanizing Su- 
zanne into action. She threw the rest 
of her things into the suitcase and looked 
wildly around for forgotten items. "Bag," 
she muttered. "Gloves? — wallet, here it is 
— Nora, if that's Durosha will you tell him 
I'm already gone, please?" 

Obediently, when Durosha's assertive 
voice rolled richly through the receiver, I 
told him Suzanne had already left. 

"Excellent, fine," he said. "We keep her 
moving, eh? Keep her so busy she drops 
from exhaustion. Many broken hearts I 
have cured this way." 

I spoke softly, so Suzanne couldn't hear. 
"I gather you know about her trouble?" 

"How avoid knowing? The little face is 
pale, the figure droops, the hands are un- 
certain — and between us, Miss Drake, my 
impulse is to apply the type punishment 
one would give to, say, a three-year-old." 
He chuckled. "A fine mess, is it not? But 
I will not have this, career ruined ! Not for 
a dozen young men with tempers — or what- 
ever is the trouble, I don't know. This love 
. . ." He made a peculiar sound half-way 
between a snort and a laugh. "And yet no 
artist can do without some. She has it now 
— the love, the soffering — so she gets over 
with it for the next five years." 

"I hope you're right," I said. 

"No, I'm not right." Durosha's voice be- 
came suddenly impatient. "With Suzanne 
is different. This is not to be got over in 
five years or ten. Tell me, Miss Drake — is 
it not possible to find this young man and 
perhaps beat him gently with a whip until 
he consents to make Suzanne happy? 
When she is unhappy she cannot play." 

"I wish it were possible. But it's — well, 
even more involved. It's not just Suzanne 
and To — and the boy." 

"Don't tell me," he pleaded. "Enough I 
have already watching after the music. Ah, 
these children!" Out of the corner of my 
eye I saw Suzanne hurry from the bed- 
room. "I'm off," she hissed. "Wish me 
luck." Then the door closed behind her. 

From the other end of the phone, which 
I had almost forgotten I was holding, came 
a rumbling, "So . . o . . o. She has left, has 
she. Miss Drake, they are corrupting you! 
Take shame!" 

Poor Suzanne, I was thinking as I 



cleared up the debris of her whirlwind de- 
parture. I felt too remote from whatever 
had been going on with her and Tom to 
have any notion that I could help. George's 
trial was coming up the very next week; 
Charles was so harassed he couldn't be 
spoken to; Tom had now made tragedy in- 
evitable by refusing to have anything to 
do with the proof of his father's wrong- 
doing. And he had ruined not only 
George, but Suzanne, by the refusal. 

I found myself almost hating him; there 
was no room left for open-minded sympa- 
thy. It was the worst possible time for 
Tom himself suddenly to materialize before 
me. Suzanne had been gone about an hour 
when he walked in. He still walked with 
arrogance, but his face didn't show it any 
more. I saw that he was almost as drawn, 
almost as tormented as Suzanne had been. 

"You might have rung or knocked," I 
said coldly. 

He didn't bother to answer. Striding 
through the room, he peered into the empty 
kitchen, and turned and saw the open bed- 
room doors. "Where is she?" he demanded. 

I said sharply, "Tom, please mind your 
manners. You have no rights here at all, 
you know, particularly after what you did 
to Suzanne today. I've never seen her so 
wretched before, if knowing you is going 
to do that to her, I'll use every influence 
I possess to cut this relationship short." 

"Knowing her?" Tom said. "Didn't she 
tell you I'm in love with her?" 

I wonder if Suzanne knows and believes 
it. For that she was in love with him I 
knew I had realized all along. 

"Perhaps she was ashamed to," I said. 

"You." Tom's voice shook with resent- 
ment. "Haven't you done enough to me 
already? I won't let you poison Suzanne 
the way you've poisoned everything else 
that meant anything to me. I love her. I 
didn't know it till she went out. Till she 
looked at me like that and just — went." 
He snapped his fingers. "That for you, 
Tom Morley. Do as we say, betray your 
father, dirty up his memory, or else I walk 
out. And when I wouldn't do it, out she 
went. But she'll be back — she's my kind, 
you hear me? You and your lying enve- 
lopes and faked lies — forged like that 
check of George Stewart's — " 

"Tom," I cut in sharply. "Have you 
forgotten how that check was forged — that 
your father engineered the whole thing? 
That George signed it in ignorance, think- 
ing it was a joke? You told Charles Dobbs 
that yourself." 

"What's the difference? It'll serve." 



B 



• eautifully," I agreed sarcastical- 
ly. "It will serve to put an innocent 
man in jail. It will serve very nicely to de- 
stroy Charles Dobbs' faith in himself. That's 
a very important point to you. Not to men- 
tion the brutal offense you've done to Su- 
zanne. She believed you were — something 
you're obviously not. Now that you've 
shown yourself otherwise, you've shattered 
her. But I suppose you know that." 

"I don't know that. I don't know 
anything about Suzanne except that I — 
that she's in my life now and I can't go on 
if she leaves it. And you know — " he 
frowned. "It seems so long ago, but it was 
barely a month, isn't that strange — you 
know I planned it all, don't you? You must 
know that, you always believe the worst of 
me and you've been so right. I planned 




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and worked to make her fall in love with 
me. Caught in my own trap, as they say." 

"Oh, stop thinking of yourself," I burst 
out. "You're young and healthy — at least 
physically healthy. If you go on this way 
you won't be mentally healthy for very 
much longer, you know. Face life like a 
man. Your father faced it. I didn't approve 
of him, as you know, but he was a strong, 
ambitious man. I wonder how he'd feel 
if he knew that all he had for his love and 
plans was a — a permanent infant!" 

With an effort, he finally spoke. "Is it a 
crime to love your father? Is it wrong to 
look up to him? Don't I have to fight for 
him if everyone else is against him?" His 
words hung almost pleadingly in the air. 

"Not wrong, Tom," I said gently. "Your 
love for your father is — or was — a private 
matter. Why should anyone try to take 
it from you? He loved you; he was good 
to you. But you must face the fact that 
to dozens of other people he was — 
cruel." The envelope. Now, I thought — 
now is the right time. He'll take it now. 

Still talking, not taking my eyes from 
Tom, like a hypnotist who keeps precari- 
ous control over his subject, I got somehow 
into Suzanne's bedroom and reached be- 
hind me for the envelope. I don't think he 
knew I had moved until I put it into his 
lap and closed his hand over it. He looked 
down at it then, and came to his feet. 
'Wo.'" he said. "I won't. Nobody in the 
world can make me do it ... I don't want 
to know. What will be left for me if I tear 
him down like this?" For a sick moment I 
was afraid he was going to rip the thing in 
two. I reached for it involuntarily, and he 
raised his eyes. He spoke more quietly. 
"Suzanne. There's Suzanne, isn't there? 
And she won't have a — a permanent in- 
fant. She's worth more than that. You don't 
have to say it. I wouldn't offer her that — " 

Almost dizzy with victory, I sensed 
rather than saw that Tom went out of the 
apartment. I went to the chair he'd been 
sitting in and looked at the table, thinking 
that after all he might have left the en- 
velope behind . . . but it was gone. It was 
gone! He would read it and he would 
know that he couldn't go through with 
this trumped-up case against George, and 



Suzanne would be happy at last. 

I suppose Suzanne knows what hap- 
pened when Tom read that file on his 
father. I don't — and I don't want to. 

So, though in a way I caused it, I'm glad 
I didn't have the task of ministering to 
Tom's pain when he read that file and 
felt the ripping away of all the false ideas 
about his father with which he had pro- 
tected himself from the truth. Nobody saw 
or heard anything of him in the three days. 
When he appeared in the courtroom 
haggard and hollow-eyed, he seemed to 
have aged ten years. 

But I had the happiness of seeing 
Charles's face as Tom, under oath, speak- 
ing with suppressed fierceness as though 
he were eager to get the words said and 
out of his mind, told the whole story of 
his father's plan to trap George Stewart 
with the forged check. He told it in such 
detail that there was no doubt left in 
anyone's mind as to George's having been 
not the criminal, but merely the dupe . . . 
and when I saw Charles realize his brother 
would go free, I didn't try to keep the 
tears from streaking down my cheeks. 

I suppose I would have cried at Su- 
zanne's wedding too, if I had gone. But 
those two did nothing in the routine way. 
Suzanne flew back when we phoned and 
told her what had happened, though she 
had already seen it in the headlines. We 
knew that this was all she had been wait- 
ing for, the proof of Tom's fundamental 
straightness and courage, and I suppose 
it served me right for waiting so com- 
placently for her to tell me when they 
were getting married. While I was wait- 
ing, they drove off one night and just did 
it — eloped. I think myself that they had 
had such a tremendous quarrel that they 
decided if they didn't get married at once 
they might never do it at all. 

I think Suzanne is happy, and I'm glad 
of her happiness; but sometimes I miss 
her a great deal. Like last night, with the 
music recalling her so vividly . . . But she 
plays for Tom now, and that's even better. 
As for me — I got up and put some records 
on the phonograph, and went to the kitch- 
en to see what there was for supper 
with a Mozart sonata singing around me. 



Mystery Mirror Solution 

While Charlie struggled to get possession of the gun, a third man entered the 
pawnshop. "Drop that, Voelker!" said Keough from behind a gun of his own. 
Voelker swung around but Keough's trigger work was quicker. "I told you to lay 
off," he added grimly to Charlie as Voelker fell to the floor. "There's thirty thou- 
sand from the payroll job in the accordion, sergeant," Charlie explained. "That's 
what Voelker was after. He conned Jean into offering me a payoff so she'd dig up 
the dough." And it was Voelker who killed Matejka for fear Matejka would 
frighten Jean into paying more money. By trying to get Keough suspended from 
the force on a frame-up, Jean had hoped his testimony against her husband would 
not hold up in court and, instead, would incriminate Keough since he'd been the 
policeman who'd arrested Jean's husband. Voelker encouraged Jean in this plot, 
hoping not for Carl's release but for the money Jean had hidden. Voelker died from 
the bullet wound, Sergeant Keough arrested Jean, and Charlie Wild quickly 
tried to forget the episode in his life that almost turned into a conclusion. 
Charlie Wild, Private Detective, is on Wed., 9 P.M., EDT, CBS-TV; Sun., 6 
P.M., EDT, CBS; sponsored by Wildroot. The kinescope pictures on page 72 
were taken from "The Case of the Airtight Frame-up," produced by Law- 
rence White, directed by Leonard Valenta. 

CAST 

Charlie Wild John McQuade 

Jean Peggy Wagner 

Keough Ed Peck 

Voelker Vinton Hayworth 



Daytime 
diary 




AUNT JENNY Every week or so Aunt 
Jenny begins a new story about life in 
Littleton. One of the most recent was the 
tale of a childless couple who wanted a 
child so desperately that they decided to 
adopt one. After a long search, they find 
the right little boy. What happens, how- 
ever, when they learn that he comes com- 
plete with a little sister from whom adop- 
tion officials feel that he must not be 
separated? 

M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WIFE On the verge of 
a serious misunderstanding with her hus- 
band, Larry Noble, Mary agrees to join 
a yachting party arranged by wealthy Ru- 
pert Barlow. But a telegram from Larry at 
the last moment calls her to the West 
Coast. Barlow, still determined to break up 
the Nobles' marriage, interests Harold 
Ramsey in reopening a play in which 
Larry had starred. If Larry returns East, 
will Barlow's plan be successful? 
M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

BIG SISTER Though the crisis between 
Neddie and his wife Hope has to some ex- 
tent exposed the villainy of Millard 
Parker, Ruth Wayne knows that her mar- 
riage hovers on a thread because of Park- 
er's influence over her husband, Dr. John 
Wayne. Will Parker be successful in 
convincing John that he has reason to be 
jealous of Dr. Reed Bannister? On the 
other hand, can Ruth truthfully tell John 
that Reed is not in love with her? 
M-F, 1 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BRIGHTER BAY Althea Dennis wants 
passionately to become a successful act- 
ress. She is ready to sacrifice her child 
to this ambition, feeling certain that the 
baby would be well cared for by her sister 
Elizabeth. But — is there a career for Al- 
thea? Is she the actress she believes she 
is — or just another beautiful girl? And 
who is Tony Race? What impact will he 
have on the town of Plymouth and the 
lives of the Dennis family? 

M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, CBS 



S't' 

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FRONT PAGE FARRELL Is it ever 
possible to retrieve lost youth and beauty? 
David Farrell, ace reporter would be in- 
clined to say no, for his involvement in 
"The Fountain of Youth Murder Case" 
led him to the tragic results of one such 
quest. A former beauty queen is killed 
while having a rejuvenation treatment. As 
David and his wife Sally aid in the police 
investigation, they uncover a story so 
fantastic it can hardly be believed. 
M-F, 5:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GVIBING EIGHT On the verge of a 
happy new life, Meta Bauer suddenly 
knows that her romance with reporter Joe 
Roberts is not, after all, to be completely 
free from trouble, for Joe's two children 
resent her so much that they may pose a 
permanent obstacle to marriage. Mean- 
while, the marriage of Meta's brother Bill 
to Bertha seems tottering on the edge of 
tragedy as Bill's relationship with the 
singer, Gloria, deepens. 

M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

HILLTOP HOUSE Shocked though she 
is at the sudden turn of affairs that leaves 
her cousin Nina married to Dr. Jeff Brown- 
ing, whom she herself expected to marry, 
Julie Paterno tries hard to adjust to the 
situation. Trouble immediately starts 
when Nina so badly mismanages little 
Bill, Jeff's son, that he runs off to Hilltop 
House and Julie, and eventually has to be 
sent by Jeff to spend the summer with 
Jeff's parents. 

M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

JUST PLAIN BILL Bill Davidson's 
sure understanding of human nature led 
him to the conclusion that Amelia Shep- 
herd was guilty of the murder of Paul 
Hewitt, in spite of the apparent evidence to 
the contrary. Bill's suspicions were proved 
to be absolutely correct by Vincent Blake, 
the young orderly who had supplied Amelia 
with the poison and who knew that the 
additional supply that she had requested 
would have been used to poison Bill. 
M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



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97 



Daytime 
diary 

Your guide to 
good listening on 
the daytime drama 
circuit — plot, 

character, time, 
station information 



KING'S ROW Through her friendship 
with psychiatrist, Dr. Parris Mitchell, red- 
headed Randy McHugh learns a good deal 
about the troubles between wealthy Ful- 
mer Green and his wife Hazel. Furious at 
Fulmer's cold persecution of the wife, 
and at his attempts to control their son 
Jeff. Randy determines to help Hazel no 
matter what that help involves. 

M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL In all the 

years since young Chichi Conrad first 
came into Papa David's lonely life, there 
have been many times when his wisdom 
has helped her to achieve a serenity 
which she might not have been equal to 
alone. Now Papa David has the hardest 
task of his life as he and Chichi face the 
knowledge she may never walk. 

M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

MA PERKINS Ma's daughter Fay is 
really engaged to Spencer Grayson, and 
making plans for the exciting life she will 
lead as wife of the successful advertising 
executive. Then why is she finding it so 
hard to forget writer Tom Wells? Is it be- 
cause of Tom himself — or because of the 
strange secret of Spencer's past to which 
Tom holds the key? 

M-F, 1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



OUR GAL SUNBAY The death of Keith 
Carlyle touches off a chain of horror. Only 
when it is shown that Keith was stabbed 
does Sunday get over her fear that her car 
might have killed Carlyle. But Alison 
Gray, the lawyer, believes Carlyle, who 
was involved in the death of her son, was 
killed by Lord Henry to keep him from 
talking. 

M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY Though 
Mrs. Young believes that Ivy Trent should 
pay for the suffering she caused she be- 
comes anxious about Ivy's hysterical men- 
tal state. Pepper, meanwhile, is disturbed 
about his wife Linda, who has had to give 
up taking care of baby Edith now that the 
child's parents have been reunited and 
can care for her. 

M-F, 3:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

PERRY MASON Perry Mason starts 
out looking for a missing woman — a wom- 
an who suddenly, for no reason, walked 
out on a happy home and a loving hus- 
band and vanished, taking her daughter 
with her. Perry knows that the most in- 
nocent law-abiding citizen may have 
some secret buried in his past. Is this 
the case with May Grant? 

M-F, 2:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

RIGBT TO HAPPINESS Under Car- 
olyn's loving care, Governor Miles Nelson 
stubbornly continues to discharge his 
duties, in spite of the bullet lodged near 
his heart which cannot be removed until 
his condition warrants. Carolyn becomes 
aware of the activities of Annette Thorpe 
and of Neil Prescott and wonders what 
they are planning for Miles. 

M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROAB OF LIFE As Dr. Jim Brent be- 
comes more closely involved with lovely 
Jocelyn McLeod, he becomes more irrev- 
ocably drawn into the mystery and in- 
trigue surrounding Jocelyn's family, the 
peculiar Overtons. What will happen when 
Augusta Creel who is virtually imprisoned 
in a sanitarium, remembers the secret 
about the Overtons, hidden in her dis- 
turbed memory? 

M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

Cynthia Swanson finally succeeds in get- 
ting Gil Whitney to marry her, and Helen 
Trent resolves to put him out of her mind 
forever. However, Betty Mallory tells Gil 
the whole story — how Cynthia engineered 
the fake marriage with Betty. Gil leaves 
Cynthia, but will this mend his romance 
with Helen? 

M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ROSEMARY While Rosemary in Spring- 
dale awaits the reunion with Bill, back in 
New York, Bill has become involved in a 
dramatic complication with Blanche 
Weatherby. Can he prove that the shot 
which wounded Blanche was not fired by 
him? How will Rosemary feel about this 
new evidence that Blanche intends to re- 
main in Bill's life? 

M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 



SECONB MRS. BURTON How much 
can one person affect events in a small 
town? Terry Burton wonders about this 
when beautiful Amy Westlake becomes 
manager of the Burtons' store in Dicks- 
ton. Though Terry tries hard to trust 
and like Amy, she is soon forced to 
admit to herself that she doesn't really 
like her at all. 

M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

STELLA BALLAS Mrs. Arnold, an old 
friend of Minnie Grady's, opens an an- 
tique shop right opposite Stella's sewing 
shop. One of her first assignments is at 
the home of Laurel Grosvenor, Stella's 
daughter. Thus Stella becames acquainted 
with Ben Jasper, Mrs. Arnold's assistant 
— a man so charming that Stella can't 
understand her own distrust of him. 
M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

THIS IS NORA BRAKE Not knowing 
the evidence Fred Spencer gave her is 
faked, Peg Martinson uses it to revenge 
herself upon Nora and Dr. Robert Ser- 
geant. She goes to Dr. Jensen, head of 
Page Memorial Hospital, with proof that 
they have been obtaining money under 
false pretenses. Can Dr. Jensen defend 
Nora against a woman as influential as 
Peg? 

M-F, 2:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

WENBY WARREN Is there some hope, 
after all, for Wendy's newly-realized love 
for Mark Douglas? Now back at the 
farm he loves, Mark seems to be ap- 
proaching a more normal emotional con-, 
dition. It seems likely, though, that until 
the whole truth about his past comes out, 
he will never be happy again. Can Wendy 
help him find himself again? 

M-F, 12 Noon EDT, CBS. 

WOM AN IN MY HOUSE Between 
James Carter and his children there has 
always existed strong affection. But lately 
James has begun to wonder whether one's 
grown children remain part of the family. 
What of Jeff, with a war behind him? And 
what of Virginia, whose decision to get a 
job was made without consulting him? 
M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOUNG BR. MALONE Driven by his 
feeling of guilt, Jerry Malone allows his 
life to become more closely involved with 
the Brownes, not realizing Mary Browne 
loves him. In Three Oaks, meanwhile, 
Jerry's wife Anne has agreed with Sam 
Williams to postpone any resolution of 
the problem of what is to happen to Anne's 
marriage and Sam's love for her. 
M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOUNG WIBBER BROWN Thanks 
to Ellen Brown's efforts. Dr. Anthony Lor- 
ing, the man she loves, is cleared of the 
murder of Horace Steele, and Lita Haddon 
is proved to have committed the crime. 
However, the trial stirred Simpsonville. 
Victoria Loring, Anthony's sister, holds 
Ellen responsible. How far will she go in 
her resentment? 

M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



98 



. 







odess 




^ 



After 



all the Mildness Tests 



CAMELS 



LEAD 



£&%$& 



latest 



Published Figu«s 



oiMq 



€^i^ ( 



***** 



*#■ 






\9\ 









\ifr- 



WITH CAMELS— 

EVERY PUFFfc A PLEASURE.' CAMELS 

HAVE A RICH FLAVOR THAT PLEASES 

MY TASTE— AND A MILDNESS THAT 

AGREES WITH MY THROAT.' 



JR. J. Reynolds Tob. Co., 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



T. 



1 he smokers of America have made many tests for 
cigarette mildness. The quick tests. The trick tests. 
And the thorough Camel 30-Day Test. After all the 
testing, Camel has its biggest lead in 25 years! 

Make your own 30-Day Camel Mildness Test. Prove 
to yourself, in your own "T-Zone", that Camels have 
a full, rich flavor— and a mildness that agrees with your 
throat. Through steady smoking, you'll discover why 
more people smoke Camels than any other cigarette! 



c/t/a/k four <Mi 30-T%t</ Came/ 




PAUL LUKAS has delighted millions on the stage ... in movies . . . 
on television. "There's no room for throat irritation in show busi- 
ness," says Mr. Lukas. "I smoke Camels— they agree with my throat!" 



Noted throat specialists report on 30-day Mildness Test: 

Not one single case 
of threat irritation 

Camels! 



Yes, these were the findings of noted throat specialists after a total of 
2,470 weekly examinations of the throats of hundreds of men and 
women who smoked Camels— and only Camels— for 30 consecutive days. 



RADIO 




l/W. 



CU 




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In color: 
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evasion 



r R 




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Dial Dave Garroway 
Pepper Young's Family 
Road of Life • Big Sister 

The Burns & Allen Story 
By JACK BENNY 



^V 




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9 



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Life itself sparkles for those with 
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Tfi&te/HylasF 




READER'S DIGEST 41 Reported The Same 

Research Which Proves That Brushing Teeth 

Right After Eating with 

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM 
STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST 

Reader's Digest recently reported the 
same research which proves the Colgate 
way of brushing teeth right after eating 
stops tooth decay best! The most thor- 
oughly proved and accepted home meth- 
od of oral hygiene known today! 

Yes, and 2 years' research showed the 
Colgate way stopped more decay for more 
people than ever before reported in denti- 
frice history! No other dentifrice, ammo- 
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..... 



. 



f COLGATES FIXED UP MY VACATION 

X SO NOW I'M SOLO ON THIS LOCATION. 1 





Use Colgate Dental Cream 
'• ' ' To Clean Your Breath 
/ While You Clean Your Teeth- 
,/ And Help Stop Tooth Decay! 



4 




*YOU SHOULD KNOW! While not mentioned by name. 
Colgate's was the only toothpaste used in the research 
on tooth decay recently reported in Reader's Digest. 



SEPTEMBER, 1951 RADIO TELLv^ 



MIRROR VOL. 3b, NO. 4 



Contents 

Keystone Edition 

Doris McFerran, Editor; Jack Zasonn, Art Director; Matt Basile, Art Editor; 

Marie Haller, Assistant Editor; Frances Kish, Television Assistant; 

Dorothy Brand, Editorial Assistant; Esther Foley, Home Service Director; 

Helen Cambria Bolstad, Chicago Editor; Lyle Rooks, Hollywood Editor; 

Frances Morrin, Hollywood Assistant Editor; fiymie Fink, Staff Photographer; 

Betty Jo Rice, Assistant Photographer 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



Should You Remarry Against Your Child's Wishes? 

Robert Murphy 

Madaline Belgard 

Knot Hole Gang 

Remember This Date ... by Bill Stern 

Big Sister Asks: Is It Wrong To Help Those Who -Will Not 

Help Themselves"!' 

Gracie Knows Best ... by Jack Benny 

Choose A Dreamy Guy ... by Eloise McElhone 

Through The Years With Pepper Young's Family 

Summer at the Swayzes' 

Dagmar's My Sister ... by Phyllis Jean Egnor 

Down At The Opry House 

Robert The Q 

Big Top 

Dave's Happy People 

I'm A Hickory Widow ... by Ramona Heifer 

Special Section: Summer Fun 
The 164 Question 
Twenty Questions 
Strike It Rich 
Break The Bank 
Ha-wkins Falls, Pop. 6200 
Junior Mirror 
Brave Voyage 
One Man's Faces 
RTVM Reader Bonus: Margaret's "Barbour Book" 

Family Counselor: Know Your- Legal Rights 

Fall Change-Over 

Art Linkletter's Nonsense and Some-Sense 

Poetry 

Fun oi the Month 

Daytime Fashions for You 

All Ways Delicious ... by Nancy Craig 

WNBC: The Old and the News 
WIP: Culinary Cut-Ups 
WNEW: "Longhair" with a Crew Cut 
LBS: Birth of a Network 

Coast- To-Coast 
Who's Who in TV 

Program Highlights in Television Viewing 
lniormation Booth 
00 Daytime Diary 

On the Cover. Burns and Allen, color portraits by Sterling Smith 
p. 54 — Wooden salad plates by Design for Living 





9 




17 




18 




20 




27 




20 




30 




32 




34 




to 




42 




44 


People 


4« 


on the 


49 


Air 


50 




50 




5H 




59 




00 




0J 




02 




04 




00 


■ m 


00 




00 




4 







For 


to 


Better 


19 


Living 


25 




52 




54 


Your 


9 
12 


E,oeal 


14 

24 


Stntion 




Hi 


inside 


22 


Kudio 


75 


and TV 


SO 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfadden Publications, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., average net paid circulation 470,024 for 6 
months ending June 30, 1950. 

EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 
205 East 42nd Street, New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. Harold A. Wise, Presi- 
dent; James L. Mitchell and Fred R. Sammis, Vice Presidents; 
Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treasurer. Advertising office* 
also in Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
sions, and Canada. $5.00 per year for all other countries. 
CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a recent 
Issue. Address changes can be made only if you send us your 

Member of The TRUE 



old as well as your new address. Write to Radio Tele- 
vision Mirror, 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 
MANUSCRIPTS, DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should be 
accompanied by addressed envelope and return postage and 
will be carefully considered, but publisher cannot oe re- 
sponsible for loss or injury. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter Feb. 13. 1951, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y.. under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P.O. Dept., Ottawa. 
Ont., Canada. Copyright 1951 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U.S. r " 
Color Printing Co. 
STORY Women's Grouo 











T f you ARE fond of someone who is fond 
lof you-keep it that way! Don t let hali- 
tosis (Unpleasant breath) take the bloom off 
that kiss . . or turn ardor into indifference. 
Unfortunately, you can offend this way 
without realizing it. That's the insidious 
thing about halitosis. But why risk offend- 
ing when Listerine Antiseptic is such a 
simple, delightful and extra-careful precau- 
tion against off-color breath? 

Long-lasting Effect 
Listerine Antiseptic is the extra-careful pre- 
caution against halitosis because it sweetens 



and freshens the breath . . . not for seconds 
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So when you want to be at your best, 
don t trust makeshifts. Trust Listerine Anti- 
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and between times before every date for 
that lasting protection. 

While some cases of halitosis are : of Wmic 

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Ed Hotchner discusses everyday legal problems with Terry and Stan Burton (standing). 



K 



now your 



legal rights 



By TERRY BURTON 



• If you have a legal problem, do you 
know what to do abbut it? Or if you 
have suffered loss, damage or hurt, do 
you know how to determine whether it's 
wise to take your troubles to the law — 
or wiser just to forget about it? 

Well, chances are that you don't know 
what to do. That's the reason I invited Mr. 
Ed Hotchner, well known lawyer and 
writer, to visit the Burtons as this month's 
Family Counselor, and give us some expert 
legal advice. 

Mr. Hotchner told us of a number of 
legal situations in which the average home- 
maker might find herself involved. For in- 
stance, if a woman is riding on a depart- 
ment store escalator that stops suddenly, 
causing her to fall down and break an 
ankle, she has a legitimate cause of action. 



The reason for this is that the store has 
been negligent in running its escalator. 

Or a woman might injure herself by 
tripping over a very small step at the door 
of a store — a step that because of its size 
is not easily seen. If that step is not clearly 
marked to differentiate it from the side- 
walk, for example, then the store is re- 
sponsible. On the other hand Mr. Hotch- 
ner told us if the woman trips going up a 
flight of stairs which are in perfectly good, 
condition and have no obstacles, then the 
store is not held liable. It is entirely the 
fault of the (Continued on page 13) 



Wednesday is Family Counselor Day on the 
Second Mrs. Burton heard M-F, 2 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. Sponsored by General Foods. 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR JfOR BETTER LIVING 



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slimness in new comfort! Just see how the Playtex 
Fab-Lined Girdle gives your figure a slim new 
future for fall. With a cloud-soft fabric fused to 
the smooth latex sheath without a seam, stitch or 
bone, it's invisible under clothes, allows com- 
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life. And it washes in seconds, dries in a flash. 



The 3 most popular girdles in the world 

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PLAYTEX LIVING® GIRDLE. With more figure control, greater 
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BEWARE THE RUGABOOJ 

HA! THE KIDS HAVE SPILLED CRACKER CRUMBS ! I'LL 
GRIND "EM INTO HER RUG BEFORE MOM VACUUMS ! 




FOILED AGAIN ! HERE COMES HER BISSELL 

CARPET SWEEPER TO RESCUE HER RUG 

FROM THAT MESSY CRACKER DUST! 




I DON'T NEED TO "BEAR DOWN"WITH A BISSELL? 
THE "BISCO-MATIC"* BRUSH ACTION ADJUSTS 
ITSELF TO ANY RUG TEXTURE-GETS THE DIRT 
QUICK, EVEN WITH THE HANDLE HELD LOW! 



PONT LET THE RUG-A-BOO SET YOU ! 

GET A "BISCO-MATIC" BISSELL 



Only $6.95 up 




Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company 
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Fall 



hem 



ge-over 





This autumn, say these 
three young Mutual misses, let 

your hair down — but — keep it neat 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR 



Well, seems it's time to start think- 
ing about damp, gusty days and 
autumn hair-do's. 

Long, loose hair is soon going to be in 
vogue again, and it is still the most femi- 
nine and becoming style of all. In fact, 
to Julie Bennett, Adrienne Bayan and 
Louise Snyder, three fetching misses we 
met at the Mutual studios the other day, it 
is a real necessity. These young actresses 
are all featured on radio and television 
and may be called upon at a moment's 
notice to play a certain role. This means 
a suitable attractive hair-do, which may 
have to be changed from full and glamor- 
ous, to high and chic, or smooth and prim. 
And don't have the mistaken idea that busy 
girls like this can always go running to a 
beauty salon. On the opposite page you 
can see their own Mutual beauty parlor in 
operation — combined with rehearsals for 
their Sunday shows. 

Julie Bennett (A), who appears on The 
Adventures of Nick Carter, is fortunate 
enough to have long red hair that is natu- 
rally wavy. Her only complaint is that the 
wet fall weather makes it curl too much. 
But when this happens she brushes it 
under to give a page-boy effect and holds 
it with hidden bobby-pins and lacquer, or 
else gathers it back with a fine net. 

Louise Snyder (B) has the opposite 
problem. Not enough wave! When we 
visited the Mutual lounge she was taking 
advantage of time between rehearsals of 
The Shadow to give herself a permanent 
to hold the curl in her hair when she wears 
it loose, and to make it easy to whisk into 
a pert up-sweep. 

Says Louise: "Some permanents are a 
good bet for almost everyone. You know 
your own hair and how you may want to 
wear it. But you must plan carefully the 
most useful basic style for you and decide 
how tight a curl to have. 

We asked Louise if she had any special 
home permanent hints. "Definitely," she 
said, "from long experience! Read the 
directions. Don't improvise as you go. 
The perm-ing is the result of a subtle 
chemical action and woe to the woman 
who interferes with it." 

But you may discover some helpful 
tricks for yourself apart from the process, 
itself, as did Adrienne Bayan. Adrienne 
(C) is featured on True Detective Mys- 
teries which is directed by her husband 
Murray Burnett, a gentleman who heartily 
dislikes artificial-looking coiffures. When 
Adrienne takes a permanent she trims her 
hair about an inch and a half. This takes 
off the tighter end curls which usually 
fluff up and out, and leaves the bigger base 
waves. But Adrienne does add this word 
of warning. "Before you run for the scis- 
sors and start hacking, make sure you cut 
just above a wave ridge so that the curls 
taper off in a curve and not a sharp hook." 

And remember — that boyish, outdoor 
look may go fine with a pair of dungarees, 
but in your new autumn black you want 
to look like the charming woman you are. 



P 



OR BETTER LIVING 



"I was shipwrecked 
5 times in one day ! 



// 



says EVELYN KEYES, co-starring with Jeff Chandler in "SMUGGLER'S ISLAND" a U-l release. Color by Technicolor 




"If sweeping floors is rough on your hands, imagine mine after retakes of this ship- 
wreck scene for 'SMUGGLER'S ISLAND.' The heavy oars made my hands sting. 



m M * 


f 




Learning the ropes on a sloop 
left my hands raw again . . . 



But between scenes, I used It kept my hands lovely for 
soothing Jergens Lotion . . . romantic closeups!" 




Being a liquid, Jergens is 
absorbed by thirsty skin. 



CAN YOOR LOTION OR HAND 
CREAM PASS THIS FILM TEST? 

To soften, a lotion or cream 
should be absorbed by upper 
layers of skin. Water won't 
"bead"on handsmoothedwith 
Jergens Lotion. It contains 
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heavy oils that merely coat 
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Prove it with this simple You'll see why Jergens 
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More women use Jergens Lotion than any other hand care in the world 

STILL lOc TO $I.OO (PLUS TAX) 



The old 

and 

th 

news 



Reporting an eclipse of the sun from 
the jungles of Brazil, giving listeners 
a tense description of the state-by- 
state returns during a hotly contested Pres- 
idential election, commentating with quiet 
dignity on the next selection of the NBC 
Symphony orchestra, bringing the theatre 
into your own living-rooms each weekday 
morning on his WNBT Footlights and 
Klieglights program and covering the news 
wherever and whenever it happens is the 
day-by-day job of Ben Grauer, one of the 
most popular and busy personalities in 
radio and television. 

People in the broadcasting business have 
stopped wondering "how he does it." They 
just expect Ben to have an inexhaustible 
supply of energy and he has never given 
them any reason to believe otherwise. But, 
like any other active man, Ben has his 
hobbies to provide him with badly needed 
relaxation. He is an ardent book collector 
and lists archeology as his number two 
hobby, placing special emphasis on the 
culture of the ancient Maya. One need 
only step across the threshold of Grauer's 
bachelor apartment in mid-town Manhat- 
tan to see samples of his collections. 

His walls are lined with well-filled book 
cases and shadow boxes holding some 
pieces of Mayan handiwork. In fact, his 
library became so space consuming that 
he had to talk the management of his hotel 







into renting him an unused electric closet 
for additional storage room. 

Browsing through the Grauer library, 
you will see rare first editions, books on 
games of all descriptions and a goodly 
number of foreign language volumes. Since 
he makes his livelihood through the use of 
words, the study of word derivations is 
Grauer's pet hobby. His most prized edition 
is one of the twelve existing copies of the 
first dictionary printed in the Western 
Hemisphere, Molina's Diccionario, pub- 
lished in Mexico in 1555. He also has a 
first edition of Webster's Dictionary bear- 
ing the publication date of 1828. 

IN a slightly lighter vein, Grauer collects 
joke books and volumes on the origin 
of slang terms. His oldest book in this 
line is the first dictionary of slang ever 
printed in the English language titled 
New Dictionary of the Canting Crew, pub- 
lished in London in 1695. He proudly 
displays a third edition of Joe Miller's joke 
book, which is considered a collector's item. 
Although his interest in book collecting 
and word origins dates back as far as his 
school days, Grauer first discovered the 
fascination of archeology as a direct result 
of his NBC work. He was sent to Mexico 
on an assignment in 1940 and he has been 
south of the border six or eight times since 
then for both business and pleasure. 



During these trips he developed a great 
curiosity about the culture of the Maya 
and Olmec tribes. He has participated in 
two exploratory expeditions to Mexico and 
Panama as guest of Dr. Mathew Stirling 
of the Smithsonian Institute. The Mexi- 
can expedition made an important contri- 
bution to archeology by finding the largest 
sculptured stone head as yet unearthed. 
Grauer takes great pains to explain that 
he had nothing to do with this discovery — 
"It was wonderful of Dr. Stirling to allow 
me to come along." 

When asked if book collecting had 
ever produced an unusual anecdote, Ben 
thought a bit and then smilingly came up 
with this one. In 1946 he was appearing as 
co-emcee on an NBC-BBC program titled 
Atlantic Spotlight, in which Leslie Mitchell 
interviewed personalities in London and 
then switched to Grauer conducting inter- 
views in New York. While visiting London 
a few months after the series was con- 
cluded, Ben was hunting through the book 
shops at Charing Cross Road and his voice 
was recognized no less than three times in 
an hour by various shopkeepers as "that 
American chap who chats with Mitchell 
on the wireless each week." In his sixteen 
years in radio, Ben has never once been 
recognized by his public in America. Now 
what is that old story about a prophet 
being without honor in his own land? 



J 




Should you remarry 
against your child's 
wishes? 



Nora Drake is featured 
in This Is Nora Drake, 
on M-F, 2:30 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. Sponsored 
by the Toni Company. 



Here are the names of those 
who wrote the best letters of 
advice to Nora Drake in June's 
daytime radio drama problem. 



In June Radio Television Mir- 
ror reader-listeners were told 
Nora Drake's story, and asked if it 
is wise for a parent to remarry 
against a teen-age daughter's wishes. 
The editors of Radio Television 
Mirror have chosen the best letters 
and checks have been sent to the 
following: 

TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS to 
Mrs. E. B. Covill, Fairhaven, 
Massachusetts, for the following 
letter : 

There should never be any hesita- 
tion to remarry against your child's 
wishes, if all other factors are favor- 
able for remarriage. 

Grace's objections naturally stem 
from a selfish fear of the loss of her 
father's love, a fact wielded by her 
mother, a jealous ex-wife, as an evil 
tool. To counteract this, it is neces- 
sary to prepare the child in an as- 
suring manner that she will not lose 
any parental love, but regain the 
home life lost to her by divorce. 

Dr. Sargent's courtship of Nora 
should include courting his daughter 
to the idea that his remarriage will 
bring happiness to them. 

FIVE DOLLARS each for the 
five next-best letters in answer 
to the problem has been sent to: 

Mrs. Daniel Constant 
El Paso, Texas 

Mrs. Ivern Boyette 
Springhill, La. 

Mrs. Nona Barbaric 
Shinnston, W. Va. 

Mrs. Hazel Heald 
Somerville, Mass. 

Mrs. Maria Rembert 
Chicago, 111. 




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written under the direction of 

Lara ine Day 



Get this wonderful book now — pre- 
pared for you under the direction of 
lovely Laraine Day, star of screen, 
radio, and TV. Regular $1.00 edition, 
it's yours for only 15tf (to cover post- 
age and handling) . . . see the coupon. 
It gives dozens of valuable tips that 
will help fill up your date hook, make 
you happier, more popular— all in one 
book for the first time! Clip the coupon 



Find Tips Like These 
In This Amazing Book: 

12 questions to ask yourself 
about your charm 

How to be your real self 

How to talk to a date 

Some tricks for forgetting 
self-consciousness 



Northam Warren, Box No. 1500, Dept. C-l 
Grand Central Station, New York 17, N. Y. 

I enclose 15tf in coin (to cover postage and handling) 
and the word "Odo-Ro-No" from the cardboard con- 
tainer of an Odo-Ro-No Spray or Cream package, for 
which send me the new book— "7 Secrets of Popularity." 
(Offer good while supply lasts) 

Name 







Address- 
City 



State- 






THE LABOR DAY WEEKEND 

ranks with other holidays as a 
great toll-taker by way of auto- 
mobile accidents. Sure, you want 
to have a good time — but stop 
and think: can't you have it right 
at home, save your driving for 
some other weekend when traffic 
isn't so heavy? But if you must 
drive, take care, won't you? Re- 
member, when you're driving you 
have two people to think for — 
yourself and the other fellow! 



N 




onsense 



and some-sense 



GOOD OLD DAYS NOTE 

A statute on the law books of 
Kentucky, plainly designed to 
protect the weaker sex, plainly 
states that, and I quote, no fe- 
male shall appear in a bathing 
suit within this state unless she 
be escorted by at least two peace 
officers or unless she be armed 
with a club . . . Sorry I wasn't 
able to warn you girls — and guys 
— earlier in the swimming sea- 
son, but the matter was just now 
brought to my attention! 

READERS' OWN VERSE— 

The Truth About Fathers 
Any child who's often bad is 

Bound to learn with satisfaction 
That a disciplining dad is 
9/10 threat and 1/10 action. 
— Richard Wheeler 




SEPTEMBER 

This month hath, among its thirty 
days, some mighty pretty ones. 
Nice, lazy, not-too-hot days, when 
you quick crowd in a lot of pic- 
nics and some extra swimming 
and all the summer-fun things, 
because you realize that there 
aren't too many such days left 
this season. (To prove it, had you 
taken into consideration that, 
come September 1, there'll be 
only ninety-eight shopping days 
till Christmas?) Our wise and 
witty friend, The Old Farmers' 
Almanac, gives the lie to my 
statements about this month's 
lovely weather by stating baldly 
that, the first few days anyway, 
it'll be pouring rain. And it re- 
minds us, along about mid- 
month, that the hurricane season 
will be upon us. Oh, well — you'd 
better pay attention to them and 
not to me. They've been in the 
weather-predicting business for 
quite a spell, doing a fine job of 
it, too. As for me, I'll have to 
admit I'm a weather prophet with- 
out honor even in the bosom of 
my family. Lois always asks me 
what I think the weather's going 
to do today and when I tell her 
solemnly that it's going to be 
fair all day she says, "Fine. I'll 
be sure to take my umbrella." 

IT HAPPENED ON HOUSE 
PARTY— 

Linkletter (to little girl) : Do you 

come from a big family or a small 

family ? 

Little Girl: Small. 

Linkletter: How many sisters or 

brothers have you? 

Little Girl: None. That's fewer 

than not any! 

MIGUEL DE CERVANTES SAID: 

"Demonstrations of love are 
never altogether displeasing to 
women, and the most disdainful, 
in spite of all their coyness, re- 
serve a little complaisance in their 
hearts for their admirers." 



M 



10 



READERS' OWN VERSE— 

Pause That Doesn't Refresh 
Man waits on trains; 

He waits on busses; 
He waits in dusty 

Terminuses. 
He waits to view 

Great works of art; 
He waits on games 

And shows to start. 
He waits on plumbers 

(Waits and curses!) 
Waits on dentists, 

Bell-hops, nurses; 
He waits to eat; 

For clerks to clerk ; 
He waits on coffee 

Pots to perk. 
He waits while bosses' 

Axes fall; 
He waits on woman 

Most of all. 

— Ray Romine 



In case you care 
Labor Day first celebrated — first 
Monday in September — sixty- 
nine years ago this month . . . 
On September 7, 1533, Queen 
Elizabeth was born . . . Septem- 
ber 13th marks Springfield, Min- 
nesota's, annual Sauerkraut Day 
... The 25th is the 438th anni- 
versary of Balboa's first sight of 
the Pacific Ocean ... in 1776, on 
the 22nd, Nathan Hale— did you 
know he was only twenty-one- 
years-old? — was hanged as a spy 
... The 14th is the 137th birth- 
day of the Star Spangled Banner. 



IT HAPPENED ON HOUSE 
PARTY— 

Linkletter (to young farm boy) : 
If you were going to milk a cow, 
which side would you take? 
Farm Boy: The outside! 



Art Linkletter emcees House Party, 
Monday through Friday at 3:30 P.M. 
EDT, Columbia Broadcasting System ; 
sponsored by Pillsbury Mills. Life 
With Linkletter is seen Friday at 
7:30 P.M. EDT over the American 
Broadcasting System's Television 
Network; sponsored by Green Giant. 



:// 



■-y 



FUN AND GAMES— 

Here's a strictly-for-fun game 
with which to test your memory 
for names, or to use as the basis 
of a party game. Now certainly 
the names of presidents of the 
United States are among the most 
familiar to everyone. But do you 
know the middle name of, say 
Herbert Hoover? Or that Calvin 
Coolidge's first name wasn't Cal- 
vin? Here are names of past 
presidents — can you supply the 
full name indicated here only by 

the initial? (1) Warren G 

Harding (2) J Calvin 

Coolidge (3) Herbert C 

Hoover (4) S Grover 

Cleveland (5) Ulysses S 

Grant (6) William H Har- 
rison (7) T — - Woodrow 



Wilson (8) John Q- 

(9) James K 

Rutherford B 



Adams 

Polk (10) 
— Hayes. 



And now here are the answers. 

•pjBipiig (ox) xou)! ( 6 ) 

XoumQ (8) sbuioitx (/,) ^^E 
(9) uosdiutg (g) ugxjdajg (^) 

1 IB D (S) u H°f (Z) PH Bure O 
("[) :s9uibq puB unj 01 sjaAvsuy 

Of course you've heard — 

"Monday's child is fair of 
face, Tuesday's child is full of 
grace" and so on. Kids recited it 
in my day, still do, probably have 
since some old-time wit first 
thought of it. But did you know 
that there's a days-of-the-week 
verse about, of all things, mani- 
curing? Don't think you need to 
take it seriously enough to let it 
be your irrevocable rule in such 
matters, but anyway, here it is: 
Cut your nails on Monday, cut 

them for wealth; 
Cut them on Tuesday, cut them 

for health; 
Cut them on Wednesday, cut 

them for news; 
Cut them on Thursday, a new 

pair of shoes; 
Cut them on Friday, cut them for 

sorrow; 
Cut them on Saturday, see sweet- 
heart tomorrow. 
Cut them on Sunday, cut them 

for evil — - 
The whole of the week you'll be 

ruled by the devil! 




NJ 



MA<mM 



f 



1 



R 

Ji- 



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uhnary 



cut-ups 



Tiny Ruffner is one 

man who really puts 
his heart into his 
work. At right, a 
congratulatory kiss 
to a W1P contestant. 

Below: The Kitchen 
Kapers version of a 
dignified interview, 
conducted by Johnny 
Wilcox, left, and co- 
emcee Mac McGuire. 





Take three hundred and fifty happy 
housewives, add a couple of spar- 
kling emcees, flavor with a perfect 
foil of an announcer, garnish with a clever 
quiz, and what have you got? Phila- 
delphia's original fun-drenched housewife 
food quiz jamboree, Kitchen Kapers. 

Leading the parade are co-emcees, Tiny 
Ruffner and Mac McGuire. Six-foot 
seven-inch Tiny still gets congratulations 
and remembrances from Kitchen Kaper 
contestants for his many years on radio's 
famous coast-to-coast Show Boat hour. 
Tiny does a great deal of radio and TV 
work in New York, and commutes each 
week to the Quaker City for his "Kitchen" 
stints. 

Co-emcee Mac McGuire who also tops 
six feet by four inches, is by all standards 
Philadelphia's leading radio personality. 
He does the fabulously successful and 
highest rated morning show in Philadel- 
phia, WIP's Start the Day Right, at 7:00. 
On top of this, he also master-minds the 
Matinee McGuire sessions heard daily 
from 3:00 to 4:30 P.M. In addition, he 
owns his own record company; leads, 
directs and sings with his own five-piece 
unit, the Harmony Rangers; makes 
dozens of personal appearances in and 
around Philadelphia; and as if this were 
not enough, he does six half-hour coast- 
to-coast programs on the Mutual Net- 
work. 

But, as the old saying goes, "When you 
want a job done right, give it to a busy 
man!" Never was the saying more true, 
for Kitchen Kapers is riding the Philly 
airlanes high, wide, and extremely suc- 
cessfully. 

Whoever selected the announcer for 
the show did so out of sheer, unadul- 
terated inspiration. He is five-foot five- 
inch Johnny Wilcox, a lad of many tal- 
ents, himself. Johnny came to the Quaker 
City back in 1948, a native of Minnesota. 
With a long and distinguished Western 
career before the mike, Johnny imme- 
diately ingratiated himself into the hearts 
of all in WIP-land. His sense of humor, 
his excellent voice, his fine sense of de- 
livery and timing, plus his size all com- 
bine to make him a perfect foil for the 
gigantic Ruffner-McGuire twosome. 

On each show, housewives vie for 
varied prizes, including Lewyt Vacuum 
Cleaners and vacation trips to Mexico; 
for in addition to everything else that 
keeps the pot stirring, Kitchen Kapers 
boasts some of the finest contests and 
awards of any similar program. Com- 
pletely sold out most of the time, Kitchen 
Kapers rides along, first in the hearts of 
housewives within a seventy-five mile 
radius of the Liberty Bell. 






12 



(Continued from page 4) woman. The 
way Mr. Hotchner explained it to us is if 
any injury that happens to . a person is 
caused by someone else's negligence — lack 
of repair — obstacles in the way — then the 
person has every right to sue. 

A couple of other specific examples 
which Mr. Hotchner mentioned were 
these: "If, while a woman is having a 
permanent wave at her beauty parlor, the 
machine burns her scalp, then the owner 
)f the shop is liable for her injury. Or 
if a woman buys a pressure cooker which, 
vhen she operates it, exactly according to 
Erection, explodes and burns her, then 
she can file suit against the manufacturer." 

I asked Mr. Hotchner, in considering 
whether or not a person should sue, 
shouldn't he or she take into account all 
the expenses involved for lawyer's fees and 
court fees. 

"You have to take the case and weigh 
all the facts and finally determine whether 
or not a lawsuit will be worth your while," 
Mr. Hutchner said. "If you're not sure, a 
lawyer will be able to tell you. Most negli- 
gence suits are handled on what is called 
a 'contingent fee' basis. This simply means 
that the lawyer you consult charges you 
lothing at all for his services until the case 
is won and then he takes a percentage of 
whatever he recovers. If he fails to re- 
cover anything, then you owe him noth- 
ing. 

Another question I asked Mr. Hotchner 
was what to do with a very small case 
which involves a twenty-dollar dress that 
has been ruined by a dry cleaner. 

Mr. Hutchner said that in most cases the 
cleaner will settle out of court, but if he 
ron't, the case can be taken to a Small 
Claims Court. Almost every state has Small 
claims Courts now to which you may 
ipply yourself, without a lawyer's aid. If 
lie loss or damage involved is around $300 
or less, you can file suit with very low 
court costs. The two parties will plead 
their own cases. 

Before Mr. Hotchner left he listed a few 
basic rules for all of us to keep in mind 
in legal matters so as to get full protection 
from the law. 

1. Always get the names and addresses 
of all witnesses — people who have 
seen exactly what happened. 

2. When you need a lawyer, consult him 
promptly. 

3. Never try to handle a lawsuit by 
yourself — with the exception of a 
Small Claims Court case. 

4. Never sign any paper (especially 
after an accident) until you consult 
an attorney. 

5. Be careful what you say at the time 
of an accident to the defendant's 
attorney. 

6. Take photographs as soon as you can. 
Frequently they are tremendously 
helpful in a lawsuit. 

7. Remember, anything that helps re- 
tain facts as they were at the time of 
an accident or dispute will be of tre- 
mendous value six months later when 
the case might come up in court. So 
keep a record of details. 

8. And last, and most important ... a 
lawsuit should never be regarded as 
a quick way to make easy money. 
However, if you suspect that an injury 
you have received is the result of 
someone's negligence, you shouldn't 
hesitate to consult a lawyer. 





Blemishes** "I started using Noxzema for some annoying 
blemishes*," says Joan Murray of Rye, N. Y. "It helped my 
skin look so much smoother and softer, I've used it regularly, 
since! As a make-up base, Noxzema helps powder stay on." 




Uxk UmSMO thy* 




4 Home MlZ&ki 



New Beauty Routine Quickly 

Helps Skin Look Softer, 

Smoother, Lovelier ! 

No need for a lot of elaborate preparations 
... no complicated rituals! With just one 
dainty, snow-white cream — greaseless, med- 
icated Noxzema — you can help your prob- 
lem skin look softer, smoother and lovelier! 

The way to use it is as easy as washing 
your face. It's the Noxzema Home Facial, 
described at the right. Developed by a 
doctor, in clinical tests it helped 4 out of 5 
women, with problem skin, to look lovelier! 

See how it con help you! 

With this doctor's Facial, you "creamwash" 
to glowing cleanliness— without any dry, 
drawn feeling afterwards. You give skin the 
all-day protection of a greaseless powder 
base . . . the all-night aid of a medicated 
cream that helps heal*, soften and smooth. 

*externally-caused blemishes 



SKIN 
CREAM 



Save this! Follow Noxzema's 
Home Facial as an aid to a 
lovelier- looking complexion! 

Morning-Apply Nox- 

V\ \W\\\ zema - With a damp 
nV\y\ [doth, "creamwash" as 
you would with soap and 
water. No dry, drawn feeling after- 
wards! Now, smooth on a light film 
of greaseless Noxzema for a protec- 
tive powder base. 

Evening - "Creamwash" 
" again. How clean your 
skin looks! How fresh it 
feels! See how you've 
washed away make-up-without 
harsh rubbing! Now, lightly mas- 
sage Noxzema into skin to help 
soften, smooth. Pat extra over blem- 
ishes* to help heal. 

Money- Back Offer! If this 
Home Facial doesn't help skin 
look lovelier in 10 days, return 
your jar to Noxzema, Baltimore, 
Md.— your money back. 




NOXZEMA 

Like foi/W)e/of /vfoi&f to ifaunikhL 




At any drug 
or cosmetic counter 

404, 604, 91.00 t: 



R 

M 



13 




// 



Long-hair" 



wi 



itha 



crew cut 



R 

M 



14 



Every Sunday evening one of America's 
most famous "long-haired" musicians, 
the young concert pianist, Eugene 
List, can be heard presiding over one of 
New York's hottest record programs, de- 
voted to the art of jazz piano. At 8:35 on 
WNEW, Eugene flips the platters, com- 
ments on outstanding jazz techniques and 
styles — telling why certain favorites "send" 
him — and in general, acts completely dif- 
ferent from the popular conception of a 
highbrow pianist. 

The blond-haired artist, who made his 
debut at ten with the Los Angeles 
Philharmonic, says this is one of the 
most pleasant jobs he's ever had. "It's 
something I've always wanted to do be- 
cause jazz, in all its forms, has long 
been my pet hobby. I'm especially inter- 
ested in the men and women who excel 
in it at the keyboard. It's also fun be- 
cause I have a chance to dispel, at last, 
the odd idea that serious musicians and 
jazz don't mix, or if they do it's only 
with condescension on the 'long-hair's' 
part." 

Actually Eugene says that countless 
professional concert artists share his en- 
thusiasm for and believe in the import- 
ance of our American jazz. But like all 
personal tastes, their interest in jazz is 
not apparent in their professional lives; 
hence the popular myth that a classical 
musician is not equipped with the sen- 
sibilities to appreciate jazz. 

Eugene himself does not play jazz — only 
an occasional popular number for his own 
amusement — as he prefers to listen to the 
people who really know how to play this 
music the way it should be done. "There's 
nothing worse, to my mind," he says, 
"than hearing a concert pianist coyly 
giving out with a boogie-woogie or swing 
number. That's one thing I don't intend 
to do. When I play some Gershwin or 
Rogers' favorite — behind closed doors — 
I always think how much better an artist 
like Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson, Mary Lou 
Williams or Count Basie could handle the 
number." 

Eugene feels that these pianists and 
others like Erroll Garner, Joe Bushkin, 
the late Fats Waller, Jess Stacey and that 
master of the sophisticated style, Cy 
Walters, have created individual styles 
and techniques that establish them as 
first-rate artists among our American 
musicians. 

These, he adds, are only a few of the 
notable contemporary jazz pianists, not 
to mention such past greats as Pine Top, 
Jelly Roll Morton and others who have 
played an important part in the history of 
jazz. Through his program, Eugene hopes 
to show how vital a force the jazz piano 
has been in the development of our popular 
music and how it has influenced modern 
serious music, such as the piano works 
of Stravinsky. 

For his .weekly Jazz with List show, 
Eugene commutes between New York and 
Dorset, Vermont, where he and his wife, 
the concert violinist, Carroll Glenn, have 
a summer home. Having spent the winter 
on a transcontinental concert tour, Eugene 
is spending as much of his time in Ver- 
mont as possible, to be close to his new 
little daughter, Allison. 






This Gorgeous Book is Really . . . 

HOLLYWOOD 
IN REVIEW 





Farley Granger 




II ere is the most colorful and glamorous movie book 
*■ of the year. It is a treasure-mine of information 
about the stars ... a real Who's Who in Hollywood. 
Here is just a brief description of this truly lovely 
book: 

STUDIO DIRECTORY— Pictures and addresses of 
all the well-known movie studios. Now you will know 
where to write your favorite stars. 

THE MOVIE YEAR IN REVIEW-Twenty thrilling 
pages covering the motion picture highlights of the 
entire year — movie memories you will want to keep! 

COLOR PORTRAITS OF THE STARS -Gorgeous 
four-color photographs of Elizabeth Taylor, Howard 
Keel, June Allyson, Esther Williams, June Havoc, 
Tony Curtis, Jane Powell, Vera-EUen, Farley Granger, 
Joan Evans, Gordon MacRae, Doris Day. 

STARS OF THE FUTURE— Photographs of Holly- 
wood's most promising up-and-coming personalities. 
You will see them here, learn their prospects for the 
future and when they become stars, you can say, "I 
knew about them when . . ." 

PLAYERS AND CASTS OF 1950 -A complete chart 
covering thirty pages, of all the players and casts of 
all motion pictures released in 1950! 

PHOTOPLAY'S PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM -Price 

less old pictures from Photoplay's fabulous collec- 
tion ! A photographic treasure chest of the early days 
in movie-making! Valuable collector's items you will 
find only in PHOTOPLAY ANNUAL 1951. 

ONLY 50c POSTPAID 
MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY 



SPECIAL NOTE 

A Limited Supply 

of the 1950 Edition 

Still Available 

If you were unable to ob- 
tain a copy of the thrilling 
1950 edition of Photoplay 
Annual — here's good news 
for you. A limited supply 
of this edition is still avail- 
able at only 50c a copy, 
postpaid. Why not order 
both the 1951 edition and 
the 1950 edition right now. 



PHOTOPLAY 

205 E. 42nd Street, New York 1 7. N. Y. 



WG951 



Send me postage postpaid, the Photoplay Annuals I have 
checked below. I enclose $ 

□ Photoplay Annual 1951 

□ Photoplay Annual 1950 



Name. . . 
Address. 



Please Print 



City. 



. State . 



Fashions listed on pages 52 and 53 are 
available at these leading stores which are 
members of Independent Retailers Syn- 
dicate, 33 West 34th St., New York, N. Y. 



Allentown, Pa. 


Somach's 


Arlington, Va. 


Young Men's Shop 


Atlantic City, 


Norman's 


N.J. 




Buffalo, N. Y. 


J. N. Adam & Co. 


Chicago, 111. 


Kaufman's 


Clayton, Mo. 


Cutman's 


Columbia, S. C. 


Kohn's 


Columbus, Ga. 


Kirvcn's Sport 




Shop 


Corpus Christi, 


Lichtenstein's 


Tex. 




Dayton, Ohio 


The Home Store 


Durham, N. C. 


Baldwin's 


El Paso, Tex. 


The White House 


Fayetteville, 


The Capitol of 


N. C. 


Fayetteville 


Fort Dodge, 


The Boston Store 


Iowa 




Harrisburg, Pa. 


Worth's 


Ithaca, N. Y. 


Rothschild Bros. 


Lancaster, Pa. 


Garvin's 


Lansing, Mich. 


J. W. Knapp Co. 


Lewistown, Pa. 


Danks & Co. 


Miami, Fla. 


Hartley's 


Muskegon, Mich. 


Grossman's Dept. 




Store 


Pawtucket, R. I. 


Shartenberg's 


Springfield, 


Muriels 


Mass. 




Steubenville, O. 


The Hub 


Terre Haute, 


Meis' 


Ind. 




Traverse City, 


J. W. Milliken, 


Mich. 


Inc. 


Troy, N. Y. 


Denby's 


Washington, 


Young Men's Shop 


D. C. 




Waterbury, Conn. 


Worth's 



Color picture outfit also available at: 
Stern Bros., New York, N. Y. 



1951 POLIO POI NTERS 




RECOMMENDED BY THE NATIONAL 
FOUNDATION FOR INFANTILE PARALYSIS 



The above polio pointers are 
excellent reminders as to what 
precautions should be taken dur- 
ing summer months — the months 
when polio is most prevalent. 



H 

M 



15 




YOU SAVE money, time and work 
when you keep Kool-Aid in your 
ice box by the pitcher full. Simply 
dissolve a 54 package of Kool-Aid 
in 2 quarts water, sweeten to taste. 
Keep in space-saving ice box pitcher. 
Then it's always chilled, fully blended, 
ready for quick serving. Handy for 
your children. Six delicious flavors. 
Kool-Aid is a year 'round favorite. 



<*<~, 



16 



Makes 20 

Frozen 

Suckers 



"KOOL-AID" 
PRODUCTS CO. 




COAST-TO-COAST 



AT GROCERS 



IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF PERKINS 

©1951 PERKINS PRODUCTS CO. 




Otto Preminger (left) producer-director of the suspense film, 
"The 13th Letter," tells John Shuttleworth (Dick Keith) of True 
Detective Mysteries all about the film — except — "who dunit." 



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Little Wayne Van Nostrand, a "peanut gallery" fan, is having a 
wonderful time working his new Howdy Doody hand puppet. Bob 
Smith, creator of the show, explains just how it should be done. 



Robert 
Murphy 



Arc's Robert "Ace" Murphy shrugged 
his shoulders, rubbed his eyes and 
commented : "For most people, if an 
alarm clock sounds off at 5:00 A.M., it 
must mean: 1. A special occasion (getting 
an early start for a trip, etc.) or 2. The 
alarm clock is busted. For me, 5:00 A.M.. 
Monday through Friday, is rising time for 
work." 

"Ace" gets up before daybreak to an- 
nounce a network newscast for Alex Dreier 
at 6:45 A.M. At its conclusion, Bob dashes 
over to rehearsals for Don McNeill's 
Breakfast Club. After announcing the 
8:45 to 9:00 A.M. portion of the show, 
Mr. Murphy, himself, eats breakfast. 

At 11:00 A.M. Bob speaks the words 
which put WENR-TV on the air, and then 
continues for two hours as co-emcee, witli 
Kay Westfall, of the Bob and Kay Show. 
Following this show on Wednesdays, Bob 
joins Don McNeill's TV Club, announcing 
and doing "bits" on the program. Rehear- 
sals, actual showtime, and postshow con- 
ferences bring Bob's closing time to 11:00 
P.M. This makes a grand total of seven- 
teen hours since he dragged himself out 
of the sack. 

"So what," you say, "he has the week- 
ends." Bob's only reply: "What week- 
end?" For the past four years he has 
emceed WENR's Amateur Hour* each Sun- 
day afternoon. 

When Bob is home he spends his time 
with his family — wife, Louise, and six 
children, ranging in age from ten months 
to nine and a half years. 

Peace and quiet? Bob claims the only 
place he can find the words is in the 
dictionary. 








Only oite soap 

gives your ski a this 

. I ♦ .^^^^ 




SiiCf/m. 



And Cashmere Bouquet is proved extra mild . . . leaves 
your skin softer, fresher, younger looking! 

Now Cashmere Bouquet Soap — with the lingering, irresistible 

"fragrance men love" — is proved by test to be extra mild 

too! Yes, so amazingly mild that its gentle lather 

is ideal for all types of skin — dry, oily, or normal! And 

daily cleansing with Cashmere Bouquet helps bring 

out the flower-fresh softness, the delicate smoothness, 

the exciting loveliness you long for! Use 

Cashmere Bouquet Soap regularly . . . for the 

finest complexion care . . . for a fragrant 

invitation to romance! 



j| 



*fe. 






Complexion and 
big Bath Sizes 



II! 



\< 







TOItEt 



SOAP 



f Adorns your skin with the 

fragrance men tooel 



Cashmere 

Bouquet 

Soap 



17 




■ 



The "tissue test" proved to Alexis • . • 










that Woodbury floats out hidden dirt! 



The "Tissue Test" convinced Alexis Smith 
that there really is a difference in cleans- 
ing creams. Alexis is co-starring in the 
Paramount production, "Here Comes the 
Groom." 

We asked her to cleanse her face with 
her regular cleansing cream. Then to try 
Woodbury Cold Cream on her "immacu- 
lately clean" face and handed her a tissue. 

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Madaline 
Belgard 



She is A TV veteran at the ripe young 
age of eight! And she is the youngest 
long-term contractee on television. 
Her name is Madaline Belgard and she 
plays the role of Teddy Lawton in Carlton 
E. Morse's One Man's Family over NBC-TV. 

Madaline started her career two years 
ago as a model, working briefly and occa- 
sionally after school or on Saturday morn- 
ings. From modeling she went into small 
parts in movie shorts and on television com- 
mercials. She had small bits in two movies, 
"The Killer That Stalked New York" with 
Evelyn Keyes and "The Sleeping City" 
with Richard Conte. 

One day, in the middle of a modeling 
assignment Madaline was whisked off to 
NBC's television studios by one of the 
models who had heard that they were look- 
ing for a tiny girl to play an important 
part in Martin Kane, Private Eye. Mada- 
line got the part. 

After that she appeared in some twenty 
other TV productions, among them "Mr. 
Barry's Etchings" for Kraft Theater; "Mr. 
Cobb's Daughter" for Pulitzer Prize Play- 
house; the Beatrice Lillie show; the Kate 
Smith Show and others. 

Each time Carlton E. Morse saw the 
child on television he made a mental note 
and when it came time to look for a 
"Teddy" he knew just where to find her. 

The little TV star attends public school 
and is in the third grade. She loves dolls, 
has a large collection of them — some "to 
play with" and others "just to look at and 
admire" and she spends much of her spare 
time making new clothes for them. She 
also collects records, preferring albums of 
musical comedies. She is an avid reader 
and has begun a collection of children's 
classics. 

Another favorite pastime for Madaline 
is fishing in Central Park's lake with her 
brother and favorite companion, David, 
ten. Madaline loves dogs and has a new 
puppy named, appropriately enough, 
"Teddy." 




Lazy Daze 

Filled a ship with wishes, 
Set an elf to steer it, 
Launched it in a frowny brook 
With a wind to veer it. 

Drew a picture in the sand, 
Watched some ants parade, 
Threw a pebble out to see 
The ripples promenade. 

Looked at busy dragon flies 
Blue as otherwhere, 
Listened to the bumble bees 
Ambient as the air. 

Brook had little pushy ways, 
Ship received some knocks 
Fretting at the willow boughs, 
Chafing at the rocks. 

Day began to fribble out, 
Elf departed gnomeward, 
Ship and cargo, disappeared, 
Ho, — hum, — homeward. 

Linn 



Summer Carnival 

There's a carnival of laughter in 

your eyes 
And gay, light music like a carousel 
Pervades the air when I am walking 

with 
Your hand in mine. I'm lost be- 
neath the spell 
Of springtime magic, frothy as the 

pink 
Of cotton candy in a paper cone . . . 
There's never time enough to stop 

and think 
That such as you could never be my 

own. 
For, like the carnival, you've come 

. . . and gone . . . 
Before I've had a chance to weary of 
The sweet excitement . . . There's 

not even time 
To wonder if . . . perhaps . . . you 

were my love! 

Bonnie E. Parker 



In Saecula Saeculorum 

The caissons roll. Whole world seems black as night: 
And yet eternal stars still shed their light. 
Despite the gas and guns, massed bombs, fear, pain, 
Proud sun will set in truth to rise again. 
The constant moon her rigid circuit rides, 
Immune to cataclysms ether hides. 
In man's destruction man shall pay the score: 
The Universe remains intact though jet planes roar. 

Mira Chamberlin 



RADIO TV MIRROR WILL PAY $5.00 FOR DECEMBER POETRY 

A maximum of ten original poems will be purchased. Limit your poems to sixteen lines. 
No poetry will be returned, nor will the editors enter into correspondence concerning it. 
Poetry for the December issue must be submitted between August 10 and September 10, 
1951, and accompanied by this notice. If you have not been notified of purchase by October 
10, you may feel free to submit it to other publications. Poetry for this issue should be 
addressed to : December Poetry, Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42 Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 









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19 



A young man's fancy 
always turns to 
one thing — baseball 



TWENTY-FIVE minutes before the 
first cry of "Play ball!" rings 
out over Ebbets Field, before the 
pop bottles start flying toward the 
umpire, Happy Felton and his Knot 
Hole Gang take over the WOR-TV 
scene. The youngsters, chosen from 
junior baseball leagues from Maine 
to Texas, chat with Dodger greats, 
get hints on batting and fielding, 
and even bat the ball around with 
the stars. The boys are judged for 
their baseball ability and Happy 
hands out major league equipment 
for prizes. But the best prize of all 
is the chance to meet with and talk 
to their baseball heroes. 



Knot Hole Gang is on WOR-TV, before 
Dodger games. Sponsor: Curtis Candy. 



Knot 
Hole 
Gang 




"You've got to get a good grip on that bat and hang 
on to it if you want the ball to travel." Left, Cal Abrams 
gives sixteen-year-old Vincent Colosenio some professional 
tips as Duke Snider watches. Right, thirteen-year-old 
Joseph Vitole gets a few pitching hints from Don Newcombe. 




R 

M 



As the WOR cameraman takes a long range shot, three 
young hopefuls, Joseph Vitole, Vincent Colosenio and Artie 
Welkner, have a chat with Duke Snider (far right). 
Happy Felton chooses the boys from sandlot leagues all over 
the country to meet and talk with their Dodger favorites. 



20 




Joseph Vitole, representative of 
the Dohill Cubs, goes into action 
as ace Dodger pitcher, Don Newcombe 
watches carefully so that he may be 
able to give constructive criticism. 



The thrill that comes once in 

a young boy's life — Joseph Vitole, whose skill 

in baseball won him many Dodger 

friends, gets his chance to shake hands 

with batter, Duke Snider. 








Just to prove the old 
arm's still in good condition, 
Happy Felton decides to 
get into the act, himself, and 
winds up for the pitch. 



; ;:;Sf:.> 



21 




R 

M 

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Who's who 



There's a quality of the young Amer- 
ican wife in vivacious, auburn-haired 
Barbara Joyce. She has been a wife 
to "Arthur Treacher in "Clutterbuck," 
the wife in the "Male Animal" and 
now plays, among her many other TV 
roles, the typical 
wife on the Twen- 
Barbara ty Questions radio 
Joyce and television com- 
mercials. It was a 
breath of fresh air 
for her when she got a chance to play 
the "other woman" in "No Time for 
Comedy" with Helmut Dantine in 
Washington. 

Barbara who was born in Oakland, 
California, wanted to be a doctor. It 
was while studying pre-med at the 
University of California that she 
joined the Community Playhouse just 
for fun. That move robbed the med- 
ical profession of a very glamorous 
member, for her work at the play- 
house brought to the surface a hidden 
talent. Barbara feels that television 
should do more of the classics. She is 
a believer in "true theatre" and wants 
TV to bring it to the viewers. Some- 
day she would like to have her own 
repertory theatre in New York. 




Earl 
Hammond 



Earl Hammond, who is featured as 
the young sergeant on Rocky King, 
Detective, made what is probably one 
of the most unusual entries into tele- 
vision. At the last minute he was 
called to audition for a TV show 
which required di- 
alects. He had no 
time to prepare 
any material so he 
began reading a 
newspaper and told 
his auditioners just to call out when 
they wanted a new dialect. Earl read 
the paper through in twenty-one dif- 
ferent dialects. Needless to say, he got 
the role. 

The draft called a temporary halt 
to his career, but after being in the 
front line infantry for a year, he 
blushingly admits, he was put in 
charge of a WAC recruiting program. 
Earl, a handsome six footer, is a 
bachelor but has definite ideas about 
what his future wife should be like. 
He is actively looking for an indepen- 
dent-minded, willowy brunette who is 
a cross between big-town sophistica- 
tion and small-town sweetness, and 
who can make real Southern fried 
chicken. 






Vital and lovely Patricia Wheel has 
been featured on just about every 
major dramatic show on television. A 
native New Yorker, she got her start 
in show business while still at school. 
At the age of fourteen, she became a 
model, and the re- 
sult was an offer 
Patricia for a stock com- 
Wheel pany apprentice- 
ship as an actress. 
By fifteen, she had 
graduated from high school and went 
on the road with the first repertory 
company to entertain at Army bases. 
It was during this time that Pat was 
fired for the first and last time. She 
had joined a winter stock company 
managed by a man who didn't be- 
lieve in paying his actors, or feeding 
them either. Her protests brought her 
dismissal — much to her relief. By the 
time Patricia was seventeen, she was 
very active in radio, but gave it up in 
1944 to go out with the U.S.O.'s first 
legitimate show to the South Pacific. 
Single and popular, Pat's prefer- 
ence for men falls into two categories 
— either comedians with a terrific 
sense of humor or else a guy who's 
tall, blond and blue-eyed. 




When George "Gabby" Hayes, was a 
youngster, his father, an oil invester 
and hotel man, wanted the boy to join 
the family business. But even at an 
early age, Gabby was obsessed with 
the theatre. He had been appearing 

in theatricals and 

later joined a stock 
Gabby company playing 
Hayes the "tank towns" 

doing everything ; 

dancing, singing, 
comedy and straight roles — and some- 
times just gabbing away as emcee. 

Gabby's beard — his trademark — 
has a story of its own behind it. Walk- 
ing down a New York City street 
some years ago, on his way to the 
barber's, he encountered a producer 
who was casting a new show. Gabby 
had a ten-day growth of beard ac- 
quired on a fishing trip. "Just what I 
need," said the producer, and Gabby 
was signed to his first character role. 
From then on he was given so many 
bewhiskered roles that he grew his 
own to save wear and tear on his skin. 
In real life, Gabby is literate, well- 
read and talks like the native of New 
York State he is. He is married to the 
former actress, Dorothy Earle. 





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of a 
network 




ON Monday afternoon at 3 P. M., 
in the Midwest hamlet of 
Anniston, Alabama, Mrs. 
Mamie Jones interrupted her ironing 
to turn on her kitchen radio. She 
twisted the dial impatiently until she 
had found her program. John's Other 
Wife? One Man's Family? No! The 
Detroit Tigers vs. the New York 
Yankees. 

How can Mrs. Jones be party to 
these Yankee Stadium proceedings, 
long regarded as the exclusive lis- 
tening property of the citizens of 
Detroit and New York? And why is 
she interested? A unique personality 
named Gordon McLendon is her 
sports godfather, as unusual and in- 
ventive a twenty-nine-year-old as 
radio, Texas and the sports world 
has found in many years. 

Son of Barton R. McLendon, who 
owns a chain of theatres in the 
Southwest, young Gordon, a former 
Naval Intelligence officer and Yale 
graduate, saw in his father's ac- 
quisition of Dallas station KLIF in 
1947, a chance to test out a hunch 
he had had for many years: that 
millions of Americans in all the 
states would enjoy hearing live or 
"re-created" broadcasts of major 
league baseball games. 

But Gordon ran into all sorts of 
opposition. First was the conviction 
of radio and local baseball "experts" 
that listeners, say, in Dallas or Los 
Angeles or Oklahoma City, would 
not be interested in a play-by-play 
account of a game played in far- 
off Brooklyn between the Dodgers 
and the Pittsburgh Pirates, or any 
other major league game. 

Second, he had to buck a baseball 
ruling which banned broadcasts of 
major league games at any time 
within an area of fifty miles of a 
minor league's club without the 
owner's consent. 

March 21, 1948, was a historic 
day in Dallas. On that day 
KLIF, with Gordon at the 
microphone, "recreated" from a tele- 
type play-by-play account an ex- 
hibition game between the New York 
Yankees and the St. Louis Cardinals. 
Thousands of Texans wrote enthusi- 
astic letters calling for more. Other 
Texas stations wrote, too, asking if 
they could hook in on young Gor- 
don's colorful broadcasts. 

Within a month, the nucleus of the 
present far-flung Liberty Broadcast- 
ing System was born. In sixty days 
McLendon had forty-seven stations in 



the network. Today with more than 
three hundred stations LBS is operat- 
ing in all forty-eight states. 

While the backbone of the net- 
work is baseball and football — one 
major league baseball game is 
broadcast daily — musical, variety 
and news programs have made pos- 
sible a seven-hour-a-day, seven-day- 
a-week schedule. They also have one 
of the most comprehensive schedules 
of basketball broadcasts ever lined 
up by any network. During the off- 
season in sports, Liberty broadcasts 
Great Days in Sports which re- 
creates famous baseball games, 
fights, hockey games and tennis 
matches. 

Raymond Swing is Liberty's news- 
caster. Liberty broadcasts fifteen 
minutes of the United Nations Gen- 
eral Assembly five days a week. The 
program consists of five minutes 
from the floor, five minutes from the 
chambers and five minutes from im- 
portant members. 

The network's Hollywood show 
comes direct from Herman Hoover's 
Ciro's on Sunset Boulevard. Liberty's 
disc jockey round-table features a 
different disc jockey from a different 
city each day. In place of soap 
operas, Liberty features fifteen min- 
ute daytime mystery dramas. Their 
Crosswords and Sweet Music pro- 
gram is a unique combination of a 
crossword puzzle and musical show. 
They also do bingo games on the air. 

Secret of Liberty's meteoric rise 
has been McLendon's knowledge 
of, and enthusiasm for, baseball. On 
all but the live broadcasts McLendon 
creates his own sound effects in the 
studio. These include crowd noises, 
band music, chants of the peanut 
and pop-corn vendor. 

McLendon, who likes to refer to 
himself as "The Old Scotsman" and 
kids his listeners about being 
eighty-seven years old," is optimistic 
about radio's future. Says he: "We 
could not be growing so fast in a 
dying industry. Put on good pro- 
grams and folks will tune in." 

Today, Mamie Jones, the baseball- 
football-fan housewife joins 30,000,- 
000 other listeners on McLendon's 
Liberty network, the third largest 
major network with over three hun- 
dred stations in forty-eight states. 



R 
M 



Gordon McLendon — the man who organized one of this 

country's major networks when all the "experts" said it couldn't possibly 

be done. His Liberty Broadcasting System, which is now heard 

in all forty-eight stales, brings listeners rebroadcasts of major 

sports programs they would otherwise be unable to hear. 



24 










•fuily Canova Show 

Judy: The last time I walked down Vine 

Street, Clark Gable gave me the double 

wink. 
Stooge: The double wink? What's that? 
Judy: He took one look at me and closed 

both his eyes. 
Judy Canova Show: Saturday, 10:00 P.M. 

EDT, NBC. 

Garroway At large 

"A modern home," says Dave Garroway, 
"is one where everything is controlled 
by switches except the children." 

Garroway at Large: Sunday, 10:00 P.M. 
EDT, NBC-TV. 

Life With Luigi 

Olson: A good citizen is a good father. 

He stays home nights with his family, 

keeps out of trouble, doesn't drink or 

gamble. . . . 
Schultz: . . . and twice a year simonizes 

his halo. 
Life With Luigi: Tuesday, 9:00 PM. EDT, 

CBS. 

My Friend Irma 

Jane: The other day Irma ran across a 
volume of Twenty Thousand Leagues 
Under the Sea, and she said, "I'd 
rather see the National or American 
Leagues. I don't like baseball under 
water." 

My Friend Irma: Monday, 10:00 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

Jack Benny Program 

Benny : I managed to get three great guest 
stars for my television show — Claudette 
Colbert, Robert Montgomery and Basil 
Rathbone. 

Babe: Gee, that's wonderful. How did you 
do it? 

Benny: I sent them a telegram and signed 
it "Senator Kefauver." 

Jack Benny Program: Sunday, 7:00 P.M. 
EDT, CBS. 

Burns and Allen Show 

Gracie: When George came calling we'd 
sit on the sofa. One time my mother 
came in and turned out the lights. 

Blanche: Your mother turned out the 
lights? 

Gracie: She couldn't stand to look at 
George. 

Burns and Allen Show: Alternate Thurs- 
days, 8:00 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV. 

Can You Top This 

Joe Laurie, Jr. says : A dowager was trying 
on summer hats in a fashionable salon. 
Several hours passed and the lady was 
not only completely surrounded by cha- 
peaux but also completely dissatisfied 
with the selection. Finally, after trying 
on every hat in the shop, she called the 
manager. "My good man," she cried, 
"haven't you got a hat that becomes 
me?" The manager bowed suavely. "A 
thousand pardons, madam," he mur- 
mured, "but today we are selling hats, 
not faces." 

Senator Ford's Can You Top This is heard 
Tuesday at 8:00 P.M. EDT, over ABC. 




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25 



Are you in the know? 





Which helps slim down 
"jumbo" stems? 

[~1 Exer-circling 

[~~1 Hoofing 

l~l Flat footwear 

Whether you're fairway-trotter or hiking 
fan — don't expect mere mileage to unfatten 
ankles. Better do this exercise: Lying on 
floor, hold leg up straight (and still) as you 
circle foot outward 20 times; then inward. 
Repeat with other leg. Foot circling's fine 
for slender ankles, as well. Helps keep their 
shape. Just as on caZerarfar-circling days — 
the softness of Kotex keeps its shape; keeps 
you oh-so-comfortable. After all, isn't 
Kotex made to stay soft while you wear it? 



Three guesses what's in this 
refrigerator? 

L~] Apple pan dowdy 
I I An angora sweater 
[~l A sweet treat 

Think she's searching for a snack? Guess 
again! She's retrieving her best angora 
sweater. If your sweater's a fuzz shedder, 
wrap in a hand towel and pop it into the 
"cooler," overnight. Makes angora fuzz 
stay put. And here's another tip: At certain 
times, you needn't be befuzzled as to which 
Kotex absorbency to choose. Just try all 3 
(different sizes, for different days) —instead 
of just guessing whether Regular, Junior or 
Super is the one strictly perfect for you! 




At this theatre party, should one of the gals be seated — 

O Beside the other O On the aisle O Farthest from the aisle 



Getting into a hassel over who's to sit where 
— won't get you an early dating encore. 
Learn your eti-cues. Even-numbered groups 
should start and end with a man; so here, 
one lad should take the farthest seat, 
, followed by you two gals — then your squire. 



Have you tried Delsey? 

Delsey is the new bathroom tissue 
that's safer because it's softer. 
A product as superior as Kotex . . . 
a tissue as soft and absorbent as 
Kleenex. (We think that's the 
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See? You can travel the play-going circuit 
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"Kotex' at your favorite store. You'll find 
that magic word props your poise — because 
you know those flat pressed ends mean 
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To revive that vacation-time 
romance, try — 

n A long distance call 
l~l A torchy letter 
I I A short note 

Has distance made your summer-resort 
Romeo forgetful? Don't phone! To recall 
those happy days, try a short note — about a 
book, movie or platter he'd be interested in. 
A light approach is the safest "reminder." 
So too, when your calendar reminds you 
it's that day, there's no chance of embarrass- 
ment—with Kotex. For that special safety 
center and soft, moisture - resistant edges 
give you extra protection. What's more, 
Kotex can be worn on either side, safely! 







How to prepare 

for 
"certain" days? 



□ Circle your calendar 

□ Perk up your wardrobe 

□ Buy a new belt 

Before "that" time, be ready! 
All 3 answers above can help. 
But to assure extra comfort, buy 
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26 



Remember 
this 
date 



BY BILL STERN 

Officially September is the first 
month of fall, but the dog days 
of summer drag right into September. 
It's hardly the time when people think 
of taking the most momentous step of 
their lives. But I want to tell you about 
some men and women who made such 
a crucial move, in face of incredible 
hardship and death, to plant the seeds 
of the very freedoms we treasure most 
today. 

During our lifetime we have seen 
and heard much of religious and po- 
litical persecution, so it's easy to un- 
derstand the predicament of William 
Brewster, his wife Mary, and their 
children and friends. They were living 
in Leyden, Holland, when the big de- 
cision was made — but understand this : 
for twelve years, the Dutch had given 
Brewster and his friends refuge from 
the religious persecution of King 
James I of England. And the Dutch 
had no complaints, for Brewster and 
his friends were splendid citizens, in- 
dustrious, law abiding and so honest 
that they had credit wherever they 




went. However, the band of exiled 
Englishmen was not happy. Their 
children were growing away from 
them, the kindness of the Dutch could 
not take the place -of their cherished 
native customs. Even worse, Holland 
had become dependent on England for 
protection from the threat of Spain's 
big navy, so that James was now in- 
sisting that the Dutch punish Brewster 
and his friends. The exiles made the 
decision to (Continued on page 89 1 

Remember This Date, with Bill Stern, may 
be seen each Tuesday and Thursday after- 
noon, 3:30-4:00 EDT, on NBC-TV stations. 






Bitf sister asks: 



. *&L-SX 






fe tf wrong to help 
those who will not 

help themselves ? 



I,N the little town of Glen Falls, Dr. 
John Wayne and his wife Ruth 
— Big Sister — have been growing 
apart. A number of things have hap- 
pened recently which give John a 
feeling that the world is against him. 
For example, he was in line for the 
directorship of the Health Center, but 
was by-passed when a new director 
was appointed and now feels that he 
should resign. Ruth, on the contrary, 
feels that he should keep on with his 
job. There have been other instances 
of what John feels to be the unfair- 
ness of fate in general, and which 
Ruth deems simply the ordinary ups 
and downs of any normal life. As is 
often the case with a man like John — 
never the most stable character — he's 
likely, when frustrated, to strike out 
at those nearest him. For example, 
he realizes that wealthy and com- 
pletely despicable Millard Parker has 
bullied and high-pressured Ruth, 
making her life miserable, and al- 
though he is aware that Parker is a 
hypochondriac, John adds to Ruth's 
misery by accepting a yearly retainer 
of $25,000 to be Parker's personal 



physician. In his heart of hearts he 
knows that by so doing he is betray- 
ing Ruth's love — to say nothing of his 
own professional reputation. 

Ruth asks herself, now, whether it 
is better to let things go on as they 
are, or to take some definite stand. It 
is her way to help her family face 
problems— but John won't help him- 
self. Is it wrong to try to help those 
who will not help themselves? 



Radio Television Mirror will purchase 
readers' answers to the question, "Is It 
Wrong To Help Those Who Will Not Help 
Themselves?" Writer of the best letter 
will be paid $25j00; the five next-best 
letters will be purchased for $5.00 each. 

What is your answer to this problem? State 
your reasons in a letter of no more than 
one hundred words and send it to Big Sis- 
ter, c/o Radio Television Mirror, 205 
East 42nd St., New York 17, New York. 
The editors will choose the best letter, 
basing their choice on originality and un- 
derstanding of the problem, and will pur- 
chase it for $25.00. Five next-best letters 
will be purchased at $5.00 each. No letters 
will be returned; editors cannot enter into 
correspondence concerning them. The opin- 
ion of the editors will be final. Letters 
sfiould be postmarked no later than Sept. 
1, 1951, should have this notice attached. 



Heard M-F, 1 P.M. 
EDT, on CBS stations, 
Big Sister is spon- 
sored by P&G's 
Crisco, Ivory Soap, 
Dreft, Spic and Span. 



28 



it iff sister asks: 



>r* 



Is it wrong to help 
those who will not 

help themselves ? 



1JJ the little town of Glen Falls, Dr. 
John Wayne and his wife Ruth 
— Big Sister — have been growing 
apart. A number of things have hap- 
pened recently which give John a 
feeling that the world is against him. 
For example, he was in line for the 
directorship of the Health Center, but 
was by-passed when a new director 
was appointed and now feels that he 
should resign. Ruth, on the contrary, 
feels that he should keep on with his 
job. There have been other instances 
of what John feels to be the unfair- 
ness of fate in general, and which 
Ruth deems simply the ordinary ups 
and downs of any normal life. As is 
often the case with a man like John — 
never the most stable character — he's 
likely, when frustrated, to strike out 
at those nearest him. For example, 
he realizes that wealthy and com- 
pletely despicable Millard Parker has 
bullied and high-pressured Ruth, 
making her life miserable, and al- 
though he is aware that Parker is a 
hypochondriac, John adds to Ruth's 
misery by accepting a yearly retainer 
of 825,000 to be Parker's personal 



physician. In his heart of hearts he 
knows that by so doing he is betray- 
ing Ruth's love— to say nothing of his 
own professional reputation. 

Ruth asks herself, now, whether it 
is better to let things go on as they 
are, or to take some definite stand. It 
is her way to help her family face 
problems— but John won't help him- 
self. Is it wrong to try to help those 
who will not help themselves? 



tfJ , Television Mirror will purchase 
readers answers to the question, "Is It 
Wrong To Help Those Who Will Not Help 
Themselves?" Writer of the best letter 

Tlr Tt $2SM; the ** ™*rt°» 
letters will be purchased for $5.00 each. 

What is your answer to this problem' State 
your reasons in a letter of Vo m ore than 
one hundred words and send it to Big Sis 

&«tJTl7 ZLZ Z™™ M ™°" 205 
ru j" St ' New Yor k 17 New York 
The editors will choose the heu letter 

5 rZd? e ' r tT ° n "^"4 and"™! 

s t assess** s= 

' 51 ' Sh ° U ' d have *>* notice attached! 



Heard M-F, 1 P.M. 
EDT, on CBS stations, 
Big Sister is spon- 
sored by P&G's 
Crisco, Ivory Soap, 
Dreft, Spic and Span. 



23 




Tops in show business, happily 

married past the quarter-century 
mark—how do Burns and Allen do it? Long 
time friend Jack Benny knows ! 

acie knows best 



tc- 



M 



#>.!', 






MBM 



f i 

/■ 




Long-time friends — and 
friendly rivals in the 

ranks of top comedians — 
Jack Benny, Burns & Allen 



BY JACK BENNY 

WHEN PEOPLE — like magazine editors, for 
instance — ask me to talk about George 
Burns and Gracie Allen, I say sure. Who better 
— I've known George and Gracie since they 
were married, and George a long while before 
that, haven't I? But, I add, it won't be a gag 
script. Straight stuff. Those two I admire too 
much to kid about them. Besides, someone 
might ask George — the all-time gag-topper, the 
loosest man with an insult — to do a story about 
me some day. 

What kind of theme do you want for this 
Burns and Allen story, I ask next. Give me a 
jumping-off place. What do people most want 
to know about them? And the answer is: How 
they got that way. 

I don't have to ask "what way?" How they 
got to be tops in just about every form of 
entertainment they turned their wits to, of 
course. Vaudeville. Musicals. Movies. Radio. 
And now, television. And how they managed 
to hang up, through all that, a record as one 
of the happiest married couples you'd ever 
hope to know.. 

Take the second one first. George and Gracie 
have some theories of their own on the subject 
of staying happily married for twenty-six years 
in a town, and a business, not noted for long 
stretches of connubial bliss. George says it's 
because he and Gracie have outside interests 
— different ones. (Continued on page 72) 



U 



Bums and Allen may be seen on CBS-TV alternate 
Thursdays, 8 P.M. EDT, sponsored by Carnation Milk. 






I -v 



PJ41-1 

"'Hi iTj 

■ HP ~' » W 


AlLj 



p,"%*»TF*-- 



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George may turn his back 

at home but you can be 
certain he'll keep his ears 

open for Gracie-isms 
that make good TVidiocy. 



\ 



Four Burns and one TV set. 
What program shall it be? 

Sandra and Bonnie don't 
always feel parents have 
priority— and vice versa! 



M 



^ 

^ 



a 




j* 



Long-time friends — and 
friendly rivals in the 

ranks of top comedians — 
Jack Benny, Burns & Allen 



Tops in show business, happily 

married past the quarter-century 
mark— how do Burns and Allen do it? Lorn 
time friend Jack Benny knows! 

arte knows best 

BY JACK BENNY 



WHEN PEOPLE — like magazine editors, for 
instance — ask me to talk about George 
Burns and Gracie Alien, I say sure. Who better 
— I've known George and Gracie since they 
were married, and George a long while before 
that, haven't I? But, I add, it won't be a gag 
script. Straight stuff. Those two I admire too 
much to kid about them. Besides, someone 
might ask George — the all-time gag-topper, the 
loosest man with an insult — to do a story about 
me some day. 

What kind of theme do you want for this 
Burns and Allen story, I ask next. Give me a 
jumping-off place. What do people most want 
to know about them? And the answer is: How 
they got that way. 

I don't have to ask "what way?" How they 
got to be tops in just about every form of 
entertainment they turned their wits to, of 
course. Vaudeville. Musicals. Movies. Radio. 
And now, television. And how they managed 
to hang up, through all that, a record as one 
of the happiest married couples you'd ever 
hope to know.. 

Take the second one first. George and Gracie 
have some theories of their own on the subject 
of staying happily married for twenty-six years 
in a town, and a business, not noted for long 
stretches of connubial bliss. George says it's 
because he and Gracie have outside interests 
—different ones. (Continued on page 72) 



* 



Burns and Allen may be seen on CBS-TV alternate 
I hursdays, 8 P.M. EDT, sponsored by Carnation Milk. 



rs 










r«_v 






, '»« HI 



I 



George may turn his back 

at home but yon ran he 
certain hell keep his ears 

open for Gracie-isms 
that make good TV idiocy. 

Four Burns and one 77 set. 
What program shall it be? 

Sandra and Bonnie don't 
always feel parents have 
priority — and vice versa.' 



r 



^ 



?\ 




Choose 
a dreamy 




Ex-bachelor girl Eloise finds that 



BY ELOISE McELHONE 

EVER since I became Mrs. William 
Paul Warwick — exactly six weeks 
ago as this goes to press — people have 
been asking my husband, "How does 
it feel to be married to the world's 
leading man-hater?" 

Before he can answer, I speak up. I 
say, "Remember, I only hate men 
thirty minutes a week, on television." 
Then I add, "Besides, I always said 
there were the dreamy men and the 
majority — fortunately, I got one of the 
dreamy ones!" 

Furthermore, as you readers know, 
in last September's issue of Radio 
Mirror and Television I publicly 
stated that some day I would like to be 
married, and that I had a few hopes 
about my future husband. In part, I 
said, "I hope that he wants to live in 
New York City; I was born here, went 
to school here, and I really love the 
place. ... I also cherish a hope that 
he is employed. ... I'd kind of like 
it if he were in the entertainment busi- 
ness. ... I don't care if he's a blond 
or brunet, just so there's a brain-cell or 
two under his thatch. Also, I hope he 
has a sense of humor. And I hope he's 
sentimental enough to remember that 
my favorite color is blue — and to turn 
up on my birthday with something-or- 
other in blue!" 

I'm afraid I was describing Bill 
there, not an (Continued on page 70) 



Leave It To The Girls 
audiences know that Eloise is 
as eloquent as ever on 
the foibles of men. But husband 
Bill Warwick hasn't any, she says. 






marriage is merely 





a matter of the right man 



Eloise's kitchen is the one room that 

is fully furnished, thanks to a shower given 

her by the Leave It To The Girls cast. 

She even received a rolling pin — but says she doesn't 

intend to put it to anything but its proper use! 



"J can talk almost as fast 
as she can," says Bill 
about his loquacious bride. 
"And I can do it louder!" 
He's an agency TV director. 



Eloise McElhone is on Leave It 
To The Girls, Sun., 7 P.M. EDT, 
NBC-TV, sponsor: Regent Ciga- 
rettes; Quick On The Draw, 
Thurs., 10:30 P.M. EDT, WNBT, 
sponsor: Vim and Westinghouse ; 
Musical Merry-Go-Round, Sat., 8 
P.M. EDT, NBC, sponsor: R.C.A. 
Victor; Eloise Salutes the Stars, 
Fri., 11 P.M. EDT, DuMont, 
sponsored by Doeskin Tissues. 





Midnight snacks in the shiny 

new kitchen aren't the extent of 

Eloise's ability as a cook. 

She claims she's a good one and 

Bill has yet to complain. 

But sometimes he does 

wish his wife would make her phone 

conversations a little shorter. 



33 




Betty Wragge, the original 
Peggy Young, literally grew up 
with the role. Introduced as a 
young schoolgirl, Peggy has grown 
up, married, and is now the 
mother of little Hal Trent. 
Betty, too, has kept pace — ■ 
recently added "Mrs." to her name. 




Marion Barney and Thomas 
Chalmers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Orvis Young, have 
been shepherding their 
flock through fifteen years 
of family ups and downs. 
Ma and Pa have been played 
by the same actors. 



34 





The cause of it all, Pepper Young 
is currently played by Mason 
Adams. Starting out as a typical 
American boy, Pepper got himself 
and family in and out of scrapes 
until he finally married his 
childhood sweetheart, Linda 
Benton, played by Eunice Howard. 



A daytime favorite 





FOR fifteen years, Monday through 
Friday, American housewives have 
been listening to the exploits of a typi- 
cal American family. Pepper Young's 
Family. In the course of this listening, 
they have heard over ten million words, 
or enough to fill one hundred and 
twenty-five full-length novels. 

The scene was laid in the small, 
average American town of Elmwood 
where the average American couple. 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Orvis Young, 
were raising their two high-school-age 
children, Peggy and Pepper. 

At the opening of the story, Sam 
Young was happily working for a Mr. 
Curtis — which job he lost to the boss's 
nephew. Then came a period of rough 
sledding until Mr. \oung was offered 
a job by Mr. Bradley, father of Biff 
Bradley, one of Peggy's schoolmates 

Pepper Young's Family is heard Mon.-Fri.. 
3 :30 PM EDT. on NBC. Sponsored by Camaj . 



Pepper Young's Family 
and friends celebrated 
their fifteenth year on the 
air at a cocktail party. 
Guest of honor was 
author Elaine Carrington. 
extreme right. Others 
pictured include Peggy, 
Linda and Ma and Pa. 

A good job well done, 
and may the next fifteen 
years be as successful for 
both star, Betty Wragge, 
and author, Elaine- 
Carrington. Adding his 
congratulations is 
Walter Brooke, Betty's 
new actor-husband. 



Here's 

A Backward 
Look At 
The Youngs 







celebrates its fifteenth anniversary as a daily listener 



re .?? 

must 



35 




Curtis Bradley, played by Ed 
Wolfe back in 1941, was 
Biff's father and Sam Youngs 
business partner. Linda 
Benton, as played by 
Eunice Howard, always loved 
Pepper . . . finally 
became Mrs. Pepper Young. 




Biff Bradley, played by Laddie Seaman, 
is Pepper's best friend. While . 
his father was missing, he lived with the 
Youngs. First loved Peggy . . . then 
Edie. Peggy and brother Pepper, 
played in 1938 by Curtis Arnall, pose for 
a brother-sister picture in the very 
best tradition of the times. 



36 





v ^e y eQrs 




40***$ 





One of the first portraits ever 
taken of Peggy and Mrs. Young. 
In the same year, 1936, the "mysterious 
widow," played by Helen Brown, left, 
entered the picture. Pepper fell in love 
with this woman of mystery, little 
reali&ing that she would involve him 
with a ring of counterfeiters. 



More Pictures Next Page 



and a long-time admirer of hers. 

AT about this time Mrs. Young had 
an emergency appendectomy. In 
the hospital she met Hattie Williams, a 
young girl whose seafaring husband 
had deserted her before her baby was 
born. Hattie, who had no home and 
no place to go, agreed to cook for the 
Youngs and, with little Butch, become 
permanent members of their house- 
hold. Sometime later, Hattie's husband, 
Jack, gave up the sea and returned to 
Hattie. In an effort to do something 
nice, Mrs. Young rented a little house 
for her, and Mr. Bradley furnished it — 
even gave Jack a job in the shipping 
department of his business. But Jack 
soon reverted to his former self — be- 
came surly, cock- 
sure and a trouble 
maker at his work. 
Eventually, Mr. 
Bradley was forced 
to fire him, and for 
a while Jack stayed 
home and looked 
after little Butch 
while Hattie went to 
work. But he was 
careless and shift- 
less, and one eve- 
ning, while Hattie 
was at the Youngs', 
her house caught 
fire. Butch was 
saved but Jack lost 
his life, and Hattie 
returned to her for- 
mer position with 
the Youngs. 

Meantime, Mr. 
Bradley's business 
expanded and Mrs. 
Young inherited 
money from an 
uncle's estate. With 
this money Mr. 
Young bought a 
partnership in Bradley's firm, as well 
as an old building on the bank of the 
river. This they remodeled for business 
purposes. 

At about this point, Sam Young was 
approached by a few leading men of 
Elmwood to run for Mayor. Pete Nick- 
erson, the "Big Boss" of the crooked 
organization running Elmwood's poli- 
tics, had put up Bill Maguire, equally 



dishonest, as his candidate, and the 
delegation felt Mr. Young, as a re- 
spected citizen, was their best bet. After 
a rugged campaign, Nickerson sud- 
denly did a switch and threw his power 
behind Mr. Young — this because of a 
split with his party, not because he had 
seen the error of his ways, as Sam 
believed. 

Pepper by now was almost through 
high school and beginning to take an 
interest in girls — although everybody 
assumed that Linda Benton, whose 
books he had carried from their early 
school days, was his girl. One summer 
Marcella Parson visited Elmwood and 
soon had Pepper under her spell. 
Linda was forgotten. Marcella, who 
had a real estate business in California, 
very nearly enticed Pepper into leav- 
ing school and coming home with her. 

PEGGY AND HER dearest friend, Edie, 
were also having their share of 
romance. Edie was first dazzled by a 
crooked jeweler. From this she moved 
on to one of her professors, an Army 
Captain, a friend of Pepper's, and Biff 
Bradley. Here Andy Hoyt arrived on 
the scene, and the typical immature 
romances of a young girl ended with 
Edie's engagement and subsequent mar- 
riage to Andy. 

Peggy, too, fancied herself in love 
a number of times — first with a- young 
reporter, then 'an engineer, and then 
Frank, a young architect in whom the 
scurrilous Pete Nickerson had an in- 
terest. One Thanksgiving night Peggy, 
taking Edie along as witness, eloped 
with Frank. Fortunately for Peggy, it 
was the night the dam burst and their 
car was mired in the tide of rising 
water. By the next morning, when they 
were rescued, Peggy found the glow- 
gone and the infatuation a thing of the 
past. 

With the bursting of the dam, life 
changed for many people, including 
Mr. Young and Mr. Bradley. Their 
factory was destroyed by the flood, and 
the combination of shock and a head 
wound caused Mr. Bradley to lose hk 
memory. In the course of convales- 
cence, he disappeared and was lost for 
a long period of time. 

One day at a mass meeting in the 
Town Hall, a man by the name of 
Woodruff incited the people so against 



. 



37 



Nickerson for being - responsible for 
the loss of life and property (it was his 
inferior materials and cheap workman- 
ship in building the dam that caused it 
to give way) , x that they set out in a 
body to tar and feather and run him* 
out of town. Mr. Young foiled this 
attempt. Woodruff, the mob leader, 
was arrested and Pete tried, convicted 
and sent to prison. 

SHORTLY THEREAFTER a piece of 
property owned by Mrs. Nickerson 
was sold by Sam Young, as her agent, 
to a group from New York — repre- 
sented by Edward Brewster. Brewster 
sold the town people on the idea of 
raising a large sum of money to pay 
for the transportation of children from 
war-torn countries and house them in 
cottages on the property. Headed by 
Mr. Young, who undertook the raising 
of the money, the town went all out — 
cottages were built and furnished by 
the people of Elmwood, and the sum 
over-subscribed. The project turned 
out to be a hoax, and Brewster ab- 
. sconded with the funds. Sam was tried 
and eventually acquitted. Later, as a 
result of a war plant being built on his 
factory site, he received six thousand 
dollars — used it to return every penny 
of the contributions. 

Then Mr. Young was offered the 
presidency of the war project now 
housed on his old factory site. While 
this was going on, Peggy -met and fell » 
in love with wealthy Carter Trent, a 
young private at Camp Elmwood. Be- 
fore he went overseas, he bought a little 
house, deeding it in Peggy's name. 
When word was received that Carter 
was missing in action, Peggy turned 
the house into a recreation center. A 
short time later Carter was found in a 
West Coast hospital, and when he re- 
turned home they were married — 
against the elder Trent's wishes — and 
had a little boy, Hal. Some time later 
Mrs. Trent was widowed, and, left to 
her own devices, staged an all-out cam- 
paign to break up the marriage. 

Pepper, turned down by the Air 
Force (rheumatic fever as a child left 
him with a weak heart), went to work 
in the war plant headed by his father. 
Here he fell in love with his father's 
secretary, Diana Greene, who was a 
widow with a little boy, Tony. After 



some time she agreed to marry Pepper, 
but never set a date. One day her 
brother, Mack, came to live in Elm- 
wood. He was a complete no-good. 
One night Pepper caught him robbing 
Mr. Young's safe. In the ensuing scuf- 
fle, Pepper was shot in the leg and 
Diana, realizing she could never marry 
Pepper, ran away. When she later re- 
turned to Elmwood, she brought with 
her her new husband, and this closed a 
chapter in Pepper's life. At this point, 
Linda (who had lost her doctor-hus- 
band during the war) and Pepper 
picked up their old friendship, which 
gradually turned into love and they 
were married. 

Meantime, Mr. Young's factory 
burned to the ground. Once again they 
were poor. Things went from bad to 
worse. Mrs. Young 
tried earning money 
by baking, until Mr. 
Young got a job as 
night watchman at the 
Elmwood bank. Even- 
tually he worked his 
way up to Assistant v/V >! IH- * 

to the President, Har- '♦w^ ^> 

vey Witherspoon. ^^ 

After his marriage, 
Pepper, incensed by 
the hideous condi- 
tions of the local 
Shantyville, wrote a 
series of highly suc- 
cessful articles for 
the Elmwood Free 
Press. These exposes 
brought threats on the 
lives of both Pepper 
and Sam — but when 
the smoke cleared 
away* Shantyville was 
much the better for it. 
As was Pepper, whose 
election as Mayor of 
Elmwood stemmed 
from his honest at- 
tack on the town's slums. 

During this campaign, Edie and 
Andy Hoyt were in a plane crash in 
South America. Pepper flew down to 
assist in the rescue. Edie was saved, 
but it was two years before Andy was 
located and brought home — a mental 
and physical wreck of a man whom 
Edie hopes to be able to bring back 
to normality. (Continued on page 89) 




40*"** 





Carter's parents, Horace and Ivy 
Trent, played by Charles 
Webster and Irene Hubbard in 1947, 
lived for a time in Elmwood. . 
Ivy often clashed with unaffected 
Peggy. Hattie Williams, played by 
Greta Kvalden, widowed, lives 
with the Youngs as housekeeper. 



38 



By the time Carter and Peggy 
were married, Stacey Harris played 
Carter. Marriage to Andy 
Hoyt, in 1947 played by Blaine 
Cordner, changed Edie, played „ 
by Jean Sothern, from a fluttery girl 
to a thoughtful wife, helping 
Andy with his new air transport line. 




w^gmr* 








A rehearsal shot taken in 
1942 of the main characters, Sam, 
Mrs. Young, Peggy and Pepper, 
then played by Curtis Arnall. 
At about this time Peggy met 
Private Carter Trent, played by 
lames Krieger, and in due 
time announced their engagement. 



39 



■ 




■■* 








■ 









■■ .0 „.■' 





1 



I 







OW Greenwich, Conn., is 
a peaceful town and the 
Swayze manse fits right 
into the picture except 
when a hotly contested 
game of croquet is in 
progress in the backyard. 
John Jr. is the champion. 

Suzanne, Johnnie and 
Mrs. S, known to all by 
her nickname of Tuffie, 
faithfully follow Dad's 
nightly news programs, re- 
port on how his ties tele- 
vise. His collection admits 
of a tie for every telecast. 

The entire family works 
on the Jayhawk, a bright 
blue 19- foot sloop, Hurri- 
cane class. When afloat in 
Long Island Sound it's a 
good jumping-off place for 
swimmers, and for sails 
on Dad's free Saturdays. 



Camel News Caravan, 7:45 
P.M. EDT M-F, NBC-TV, 
sponsored by Camel Ciga- 
rettes. Who Said That, Mon. 
10:30 P.M. EDT, NBC-TV, co- 
operative sponsors. John Cam- 
eron Swayze Show, Sun. 3:45 
P.M. EDT, NBC, sponsored by 
Raytheon-Belmont Television. 



■t "+**■ 



Summer 
at the 




THE John Cameron Swayze fam- 
ily, from Kansas City by way of 
a stay in California, have lived in 
Connecticut since 1947 in a white 
clapboard house with black trim in 
what was once an apple orchard, of 
which only two fine trees remain. Son 
Johnnie is now a Harvard man, lately 
graduated from a well-known military 
academy. Daughter Suzanne goes to 
Greenwich High. The dog, Skippy, 
and Kitty complete the family. It's 
up in the little third floor study of this 
house that the famous Swayze news- 
casts and columns, and his knowledge 
of Who Said That, are plotted, between 
time for a typical American family 
pattern of life. 



Dad's broadcasting 
chores know no seasons, 
but somehow there's 
time for sun and fun 



i 



V ' 



jnM|rifiMMjHGMHiM|M 




Skip, half Collie and half 
Shepherd dog, came with 
the family from California 
where he cost three dollars 
at the Humane Society ken- 
nels five years ago when 
John headed news and 
events for Hollywood NBC. 



Three TV programs, one 
of them a daily, and a Sun- 
day radio news program, 
plus five 500-word syndi- 
cated newspaper columns 
a week entitle a man to a 
little extra service. At least, 
that's what Mrs. JCS says. 

Fourteen-year-old Suzie 
wore her first formal this 
year, dresses with Tuffie's 
help for a party at the 
Yacht Club. Suzie dances, 
butdisclaims show business 
aspirations, has decided 
flair for drawing, painting. 



Sentimental home girl with that figure — 

no wonder the mail (and male) pull is terrific! 

Dagmars mg sister 



ON TELEVISION my sister plays a not-very-bright blonde known as Dagmar, with 
the kind of figure for which low-cut evening gowns were obviously invented. Off 
television ray sister has a keen brain under her blonde pin-curls, and the low-cut 
evening dresses — the figure's still there, of course — are merely one part of her ward- 
robe. She owned only one the night they first called her to appear on Broadway Open 
House. And she looked just as beautiful then, was just as talented and witty, just as 
sweet and j ust as sentimental under all her clowning as she is today. 

The family always knew Sis was a born comedienne, when she was Virginia Ruth 
Egnor, and when she took the stage name of Jennie Lewis ; when she became Dagmar 
it was no surprise to us at all. To the home folks, of course, she is still our Sis. Home 
is Huntington, West Virginia, and Sis the oldest of our family of seven children. 
I'm next, my brother Jackie is nineteen, Mary Ann is sixteen, (Continued on page 82) 

Dagmar can be seen three times a week — Tuesday, Thursday and Friday — on NBC's late-evening com- 
edy show, Broadway Open House: 11 P.M. EDT, NBC-TV, sponsored by Anchor Hocking Glass Co. 





imily party on a 
nighmclub date includes 

%mar and her new husband? 
DanMi; her sister, 

mother — who came 
to get bet/M: acquainted 

withyter son-in-law. 



i 



42 




BY PHYLLIS JEAN EGNOR 

Sis's sister came up 
from Huntington, West Virginia, 
to act as Girl Friday and 
general secretary in the fan-mail, 
clothes-buying and helpful 
advice departments. Says 
"I can't get anything done 

when Sis is around — she 
keeps running in every 
minute to talk to me 
about new ideas!" 





Clown of Grand Ole Opry is the Duke of 
Paducah, otherwise known as Benjamin Franklin 
— Whitey — Ford. Roy Acuff started out 
in a medicine show. That's his wife, Millie, 
playing catcher for the home team. 




Grand 



Opiy House 



DOWN IN Nashville they tell the 
story — the true story — of the 
old Kentucky mountaineer who, 
never having been on a train, walked 
some twenty miles to the station and 
took his first ride on the steam cars 
to see WSM's Grand Ole Opry. 
There are a lot of other stories like 
that, all of them true. But none 
of them, no matter how unlikely- 
sounding, come near to telling 
exactly how important Grand Ole 
Opry is to the people of Nashville 
and the surrounding territory— and 
the whole country— who love Amer- 
ican folk music. Starting twenty- 
five years ago in a cramped studio, 
the show has outgrown one hall after 
another until nowadays every seat 
of Nashville's largest auditorium is 
spoken for eight weeks in advance 
of each performance. Records made 
by Opry performers have reached a 
staggering total sale of more than 
150,000,000 discs. On these pages 
are some of the people — there are a 
great many more — who've made this 
show so fabulous a success, who'll 
keep right on to greater successes. 

Grand Ole Opry is heard, every Saturday 
at 10:30 P.M. EDT over NBC network 
stations, sponsored by R. J. Reynolds Co. 



Hank Williams began singing 
when he was eight, has been at it ever 
since. On the side, Hank and his 
wife, Audrey, run a kind of "boots and 
saddles" emporium for cowboy gear. 





Bumptious Minnie Pearl is 
Ophelia Colley by birth and Mrs 
Henry Cannon by marriage, 
a schoolteacher before starting 
her "Howdee-e-e-!" act. 






44 



Ole Opry's getting grander— and livelier— every year it gets older! 








Red Foley got a start- 
to-fame guitar when just 
a kid. His father 
took the instrument in on 
a bad debt, Red says. 

There's a reason for 
putting the "little" 
before Jimmy Dickens' 
name — he measures in at 
four feet eleven inches! 

Ernest Tubbs' record 
shop (and his recordings) 
keep him a mighty busy 
man. Another Hank — Snow 
— pauses for refreshment. 







45 



Robert 
the 




• Take a cue from Robert Q if you 
want to learn how to answer your 
mail briefly and to the point. For 
instance, when a fan asked what 
the Q stood for, Bob answered suc- 
cinctly, "Dear Miss M. That is the 
Q-uestion. Sincerely, Robert Q. 
Lewis." (Actually the Q stands for 
Exactly Nothing. Bob merely 
wanted a middle initial as he con- 
fessed in a Radio Television Mir- 
ror story last July.) 

Here are more typical excerpts 
from Mr. Lewis' mailbag and some 
typical Robert Q-ute answers: • 

Dear Bob: 

After seeing you on TV I'm 
curious to know why such an in- 
credibly handsome young man is 
willing to wear glasses. 

Miss J. D., Boston, Mass. 



Dear Miss D. : 

After reading your charming 
letter I suggest you see your eye 
doctor immediately. 

Dear Robert Q: 

My sister's boy friend says you're 
forty, my mother says you act 
fourteen, and my sister says you're 
wonderful. How old are you? 

Johnny N., Hollywood Calif. 

Dear Johnny: 

I'm as old as I feel which, before 
I got to the part about your sister, 
was terrible. (Confidentially, I was 
thirty last April 5.) 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

Do you like being a Godfrey 
eight-iveek summer replacement on 
his morning radio program? 

Marilyn L., Des Moines, la. 
Dear Marilyn: 

This is a question I want to an- 
swer seriously and sincerely, be- 
cause I have never enjoyed doing 
anything as much and I am very 
grateful to Arthur Godfrey for the 
opportunity of taking over his pro- 
gram during August and Septem- 
ber. 

Dear Bob: 

I never heard you speak of own- 
ing a pet. Do you ? 

Jane G. T., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dear Jane: 

I have recently acquired a dog — 
I guess he's an autograph hound. 
Anyhow, I named him Matinee. 
He was sick as a man recently and 
some of his reactions were so slow 
I was thinking of sending him to- 
an analyst, until I remembered he 
isn't allowed up on couches. 

Dear Robert Q: 

When are you going to play your 
latest records on your CBS daily 
radio (Continued on page 81) 

Robert Q. Lewis is heard on The Shou 
Goes On, Sat. 9:30 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV, 
sponsored by American Safety Razor: 
Arthur Godfrey Time, M-F 10 A.M. 
EDT, CBS, sponsored by Toni, Reid- 
Murdoch, Rinso, Pillsbury Mills, Ches- 
terfields, National Biscuit Co.; Robert 
Q's Waxworks, 7 P.M. EDT, Monday 
through Friday, CBS stations.- 



46 





J 



/ 



A circus every Saturday— lions and tigers and everything— ^\\\ a ^ on TV! 




igtop 



A FOOL about the circus? You bet I 
am!" says Jack Sterling, who dons 
a black top hat and red tailcoat every 
Saturday for his stint as ringmaster of 
CBS-TV's circus show, Big Top. Jack's 
enthusiasm for his j ob is matched by the 
hordes of kids — and grownups — who 
invade the TV tent in Philadelphia every 
Saturday to watch the three-ring thrills 
that noontime viewers can see for a flick 
of the dial. Big Top's hour on the chan- 
nels is complete with everything from 
acrobats to zebras. It has three clowns 
and, true to tradition, their performance 
is strictly pantomime. Jack considers his 
whistle the single most important factor 
of the show. It's the cue that runs Big 
Top, as any other circus, from start to 
finish. Biggest problem on Big Top is 
timing. It's impossible to predict what 
animals will do — sometimes a horse or 
dog decides to be stubborn and take its 
time doing a trick. Often the reverse is 
true — an animal will perform with speed 
not exhibited during rehearsal. Jack 
ad libs with the kids during these un- 
scheduled lapses. Authentic added touch : 
a popcorn-peanuts-and-ice cream conces- 
sion. Charles Vanda produces Big Top; 
Paul Ritts directs. 



Big Top is telecast Saturdays 12 Noon, EDT, 
on CBS-TV stations. Sponsored by Se.altest. 





48 




4 



Music by the famous 
Philadelphia 

Mummers Band, gaily clad, 
opens, closes and 
intersperses Big Top. 

^avorting across Ringmaster Jack 

^ these pages is Sterling gives two young 

Jingle. Other Big Top » Big Top devotees 
clownsWRd McMahon, an extra close 



f 



look at goings-on. 




Dave's 
happy 

people 



A hostess famous for her parties once 
advised, "Invite more people than the 
room comfortably accommodates. Crowded 
together, they're sure to have a good time." 
The lucky few who daily wedge in to watch 
Dial Dave Garroway agree, though Dave 
asked for NBC's smallest studio only be- 
cause big audiences overwhelm him. Seat 
no more than ten, specified Dave. So ten sit 
— and the rest sit on the ten's laps or stand, 
for, particularly when touring high school 
classes visit, the ten often increases to forty. 
The kids love the crowding. They don't 
mind tucking their feet up so writer Charlie 
Andrews can get by. Boys, sitting so close, 
find Connie Russell's beauty breathtaking. 
And girls, seeing handsome Jack Haskell, 
wish for a boy friend just like that, please! 
Young musicians thrill as they watch Art 
Van Damme's fingers fly over the keys. 
Dave, of course, is just as they expected him 
to be: broad shouldered, easy going, con- 
fiding. His shy smile at the end of a joke 
invites an answering smile instead of a re- 
sounding laugh. But everyone likes best — 
in the studio or listening at home — the way 
Dave joins in the audience's enjoyment of 
the show. "Why," one listener wrote, "he's 
more like a proud big brother talking about 
the talented youngsters in his family than 
he is like an emcee!" That's why the staff 
at NBC have started to call the cast of the 
program "Dave's happy people." 

Dial Dave Garroway, produced by Parker Gibbs, 
M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, NBC. Sponsor: Dial Soap. 



There's room for only ten 

in the studio — so forty crowd 
inside. A tight fit, hut they have 
such fun nobody minds a bit! 



50 




T 

SL fi 



WJ 



How high is Haskell? Answer: considerably farther 
off the ground than Russell. When Jack and Connie 
sing at the same mike, as they often do, Connie's sup- 
plied a special for-standing-on-purposes platform. 

Garroway gang combines business with Vitamin D, 
holding a conference on Merchandise Mart roof. Left 
to right are Parker Gibbs, Art Van Damme, Jack Has- 
kell, Charlie Andrews, Connie Russell — and Dave. 



4' M 




f 



y 



x 



U*i'j 









1 



1 



Connie, about to sing, doesn't heed Dave's description 
of her "Crimson Dior gown" — actually a blue skirt 
and blouse. Haskell snickers as Dave adds "plunging 
neckline, choker collar." Connie gets it. "Who — me?" 

Hold it! Show can't — and won't — go on till gum- 
chewing Charlie Andrews gets his daily ration. Connie 
has been through this before. Like cigarette cadgers, 
Charlie is always going to "buy a pack — some day!" 

The rooftop conference went so well that one day 
Dave took the whole show — and audience — up on the 
roof. A show gimmick is argument about Connie's hair 
style, so this time she put it up in little-girl braids. 



-^\ 



^ 




51 




X 





\ 






RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR 



daytime fashions for you 



In sportswear the country look is the comfortable look and the comfortable 

look is the fashion-wise look — what more could anyone ask? Nearly every 

woman's idea of perfect all-day wear is the blonse and/or sweater and skirt 

combination. Dyed to match in color, these separates are soft as a 

kitten, have as many lives. Here Anne Sargent, Jocelyn McLeod on Road 

of Life (M-F at 3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC, sponsored by Crisco), models three pretty sets 

of budget beauties, all to be found at the stores listed on page 15 



Color — one of the nicest, newest for fall is rich russet, accessorized here with gold, 
turf brown. The top: turtle necked, drop shouldered blouse in a wonderful new fabric 
of 100% spun nylon that fits and washes like a dream, never needs ironing! Sizes 10-18, 
priced about $10.95. The skirt: velvet-top corduroy with two pockets, inverted pleat, 
narrow self belt — we've used a leather one. In 10-18, about $8.95. Both by Korday in 
dyed-to-match russet, purple, green, cyclamen, gold — and separately in other colors. 
Rogers Van S bag, Town and Country shoes, Criterion belt. Gloves by Wear Right. 



Like the fairy tale princess, this long-sleeve slipover is as good as it is 
beautiful, and you'll feel like the princess wearing it! Dolman sleeves and 
crew neck are noteworthy. Of 100% Austrian zephyr, sizes 34-40 and 10-16, 
in oxford, tan, blue, gold, green, red, lavender, purple, about $7.95. By 
Select Sportswear. The skirt, by Korday, pin-check imported all wool tweed, 
with two pockets and four gores for fashionable flare. Sizes 10-18, in green 
and russet tweed, about $12.95. Jewelry by Bill Agnew, Wear Right gloves. 



Match-mates again: short sleeve 
semi-fitted classic slipover is topped 
by a long sleeve classic cardigan, 
also semi-fitted. Both in 100% 
Austrian zephyr, by Select Sports- 
wear; 34-40, 10-16. Short sleeve 
sweater about $5.00; long sleeve 
about $7.95. The flare skirt — two 
diagonal pockets — in all wool J. P. 
Stevens flannel to match, by Centu- 
ry Sportswear. Sizes 10-18, about 
$7.95. Dyed-to-match in navy, 
purple, black, green, wine or for 
contrast — in other colors. 






bl 

J 
ID 

h 
K 
bl 
> 

Z 


u 

h 
J 
D 
< 
Z 
Ui 

z 





53 






,*««»► * . \ 




* M< 














-> ■* 




BY NANCY CRAIG 

Radio Television Mirror 
Food Counselor. 
Heard 4 P.M. EOT. 
Mon.-Fri. on W1Z-TV. 



All 
ways 

delicious: 




MY FAMILY sniff happily and appreciatively 
whenever I make our favorite beef stew. 
Mushrooms give a dark rich flavor to the broth. 
Mushroom caps, stuffed and baked, lend fra- 
grance and garnish the serving platter. I serve 
very little besides the main dish. An antipasto 
type salad starts the meal, garlic bread aids the 
stew, poached pears with a pecan meringue add 
the finishing touch to the meal. A few or a 
generous number of mushrooms, canned or fresh, 
can turn an ordinary dish into an appetizing, 
always anticipated delight. 

(Recipes tested by the Macfadden Kitchen) 



WINE BEEF STEW 
Makes 6 servings 

2 pounds beef stew 
meat 

2 tablespoons butter 

2 tablespoons cook- 
ing sherry 

6 mushroom*, 
quartered 

1 clove garlic, minced 



hi\. cup tomato sauce 
3 tablespoons flour 
1 cup beef stock or 

bouillon 
1 cup red wine 
1 teaspoon salt 

Vi teaspoon pepper 
1 bav leaf 



Cut beef into 2 inch cubes. Add to hot butter in 
saucepan. Brown on all sides. Stir in sherry 
wine. Remove meat. Add mushrooms and 
minced garlic; cook for 1 minute. Stir in tomato 
sauce and flour to make a smooth paste. Add 
stock slowly while stirring. Bring mixture to a 
boil. Add y-i cup red wine, seasonings, bay leaf 
and beef. Cook over low heat about 1% hours 
or until meat is tender. Add remaining red wine 



during cooking period. Serve stew in rice ring. 

STUFFED MUSHROOM CAPS 

Makes 6 servings 



12 mushrooms 
3 tablespoons butter 
3 tablespoons 

chopped onion 
3 tablespoons 

chopped celery 



x /% teaspoon salt 
dash pepper 
1 teaspoon lemon 
juice 
1^4 cups soft bread 
crumbs 



Wash mushrooms: remove stems. Chop stems 
fine. Melt butter in skillet. Add chopped stems, 
onion and celery. Cook over low heat for 5 
minutes. Add salt, pepper, lemon juice and bread 
crumbs. Mix well. Fill mushroom caps using a 
small spoon. Place stuffed caps in greased baking 
pan. Bake in moderate oven (375°F. I for 15 
minutes. Garnish with parsle\ . 

MOLDED CRANBERRY NUT SALAD 
Makes 6 servings 

1 package lemon ] /2 can jellied cran- 

gelatine berry sauce 

1 cup water V4 cup chopped nuts 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 

Dissolve gelatine according to directions on 
package using 1 cup water. Chill until mixture 
thickens. Crush cranberry sauce with a fork. Add 
chopped nuts and crushed cranberry sauce and 
strained lemon juice to lemon gelatine. Divide 
among 6 individual molds. Chill until firm. Un- 
mold and serve with relishes. 



RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR X OR BETTER LIVING 



F 



55 



Game Of The Day is heard every 
day of the week on MBS, sponsored 
by Gillette Safety Razor Co., 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., local 
sponsors. Check paper for time. 




: M 1 |i 




•*^fc' ' 3 






1 "-^ 1 




W^ 


''■> 


9 ^ 


i ,» 


*^^^MI 


'• •^'' W^^B 



/n summer, everything's hurried 

at the Heifers'. Hurry to get Daddy up, 

get him a snack when he's late 

getting home, hurry him off to today's game 

— halfway cross-country, sometimes! 



Al didn't lay eyes on the 
■ pretty Hartsdale home- — where 
Ramona, Mona and Mother 
keep the fires burning — until the 
purchase contract was signed. 



I'm 



a 



56 




Next, to Ramona, Al loves baseball. And Ramona 

loves Al, so how can she object to sharing him with a "rival 



•>•> i 



hickory widow 



BY RAMONA HELFER 

It's just my luck. If I were the wife 
of a writer with a bad temper he'd 
probably be underfoot all the time, but 
I'm married to Al Heifer, a prince of 
men and a dream come true — and seven 
months of the year he travels all over 
the country as sportscaster for Mutual'? 
baseball coverage! 

For instance : when we moved into our 
present home at Hartsdale, New York, 
he didn't even see the house before he 
signed the purchasing contract. I caught 
him with pen in hand at La Guardia 
between planes and moved in with our 
daughter and my mother. 

During the first few weeks our new 
neighbors were extremely kind but they 



seemed to be sorry for me. One day 
neighbor Ruth Muller came over. "I 
don't mean to intrude," she said, "but 
if you need any help around the house 
my husband will be glad to give you a 
hand." 

I didn't quite understand at first, but 
as we began talking I realized that Ruth 
and our other neighbors thought I was 
a widow. I told her that I was really 
only a "baseball widow." (I was very 
happy for the opportunity to explain 
because Al, when he does get home, 
generally arrives at one in the morning 
and leaves again a few hours later to 
catch another plane ! ) * 

Of course. {Continued on page 84) 




Mono, is something of a baseball fan, 
too. She's certainly an Al fan — won't 
wear her jeans when Daddy's home, but 
always dresses her very best for 
occasions of, "I've a date with Daddy'' 



AVs every bit as much a Mona fan. 

Once when he got home, dead tired, at 

two in the morning he stayed up two more 

hours to fix the swings he had 

promised her for a party the next day. 






57 



Game Of The Day is heard every 
day of the week on MBS, sponsored 
by Gillette Safety Razor Co., 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., local 
sponsors. Check paper for lime. 






In summer, everything's hurried 

at the Heifers'. Hurry to get Daddy up, 

get him a snack when he's late 

getting home, hurry him off to today's game 

— halfway cross-country, sometimes! 



Next, to Ramona, Al loves baseball. And Ramona 

loves Al, so how can she object to sharing him with a "rival"? 



hickory widow 



Al didn't lay eyes on the 
■ pretty Hartsdale home — where 
Ramona, Mono and Mother 
keep the fires burning — until the 
purchase contract ivas signed. 



56 




BY RAMONA HELFER 

It's just my luck. If I were the wife 
of a writer with a bad temper he'd 
probably be underfoot all the time, but 
I'm married to Al Heifer, a prince of 
men and a dream come true — and seven 
months of the year he travels all over 
the country as sportscaster for Mutual's 
baseball coverage! 

For instance : when we moved into our 
present home at Hartsdale, New York, 
he didn't even see the house before In- 
signed the purchasing contract. I caught 
him with pen in hand at La Guardia 
between planes and moved in with our 
daughter and my mother. 

During the first few weeks our new 
neighbors were extremely kind but the) 



seemed to be sorr) for me. One daj 
neighbor Ruth Mullei came over. "I 
don't mean to intrude," she s;iid. "but 
if you need an\ help around the house 
my husband will be glad to ni\e you a 
hand." 

1 didn't quite understand at first, but 
as we began talking I realized that Mulh 
and our other neighbors thought I was 
a widow. I told her thai I was ieall\ 
only a "baseball widow." (1 was very 
happy for the opportunitj to explain 
because Al, when lie does get home, 
generally arrives al one in the morning 
and leaves again a few hours later to 
catch another plane! I 

Of course. [Continued on page 840 




Mona is something of a baseball fan. 
too. She's certainly an Al fan— won't 
wear her jeans when Daddy's home, but 
always dresses her very best for 
occasions of, "I've a date with Daddy' 



AVs every bit OS much a Mona fan. 
Once when he got home, dead tired, at 
two in the morning he stayed up two mon 
hours to fix the swings he had 
promised her for a party the next day. 



57 



/"*«* 







1 1 1 



The $64 
question 






Strictly for fun . . . 
four pages of radio, 
TV games to while 
away summer stay- 
at-home hours 




CO 



^=V* 




AccoRpiON-playing 
L quizmaster Phil 
Baker made the last 
question of Take It Or 
Leave It into such a 
widely quoted expression 
that in its honor the pro- 
gram was renamed, The 
$64 Question. After 
eleven years on the air, 
it still remains a favorite 
of armchair puzzlebugs 
who stoutly insist if they 
had been at . the micro- 
phone, they could have 
answered all the questions. To settle this 
debatable point, here are questions taken 
right from the script. Now test your skill. 
Famous Animals: Fact and Fiction 
$1.00 1. What animal ain't what she used 

to be? 
$2.00 2. What dog is the constant com- 
panion of Donald Duck and 

Mickey Mouse? 
$4.00 3. Why did the lion spare Andro- 

cles' life? 
$8.00 4. How did Pegasus differ from 

other horses? 
$16.00 5. What Victorian poetess had a 

cocker spaniel named Flush? 
$32.00 6. What animal in Kipling's Just 

So Stories was known for his 

insatiable curiosity? 
$64.00 7. What animal beat a unicorn? 
Eating and Drinking — I'll tell you what I'm 
eating and drinking ; you guess where I am. 
$1.00 1. I'm eating blinchiki and drinking 

a glass of tea with jam in it. 
2. I'm eating frog's legs and drink- 



Phil Baker. $64 emcee 



$2.00 
$4.00 
$8.00 



ing Chablis. 



3. I'm eating a cut off the joint and 
drinking ale. 

4. I'm eating shark's fins and drink- 
ing jasmine tea. 

$16.00 5. I'm eating goulash and drinking 
Tokay. 

$32.00 6. I'm eating sauerbraten and 
drinking schnapps. 

$64.00 7. I'm eating baked beans and cod- 
fish cakes and drinking my 
breakfast coffee. 
For answers, turn to page 79. 

Heard Sundays at 10:30 PM, EDT, on NBC. 



58 




I Twenty 
I questions 




THE only clue emcee Bill Slater gives the 
panel on Twenty Questions is whether 
the subject is animal, vegetable or mineral. 
They have twenty questions, answerable by 
"yes" or "no," with which to identify it. 
Here is a sample of the techniques employed 
by the panel. The subject of the questions 
below was announced as a combination of 
"mineral and vegetable." Follow the ques- 
tions and answers. Can you identify the sub- 
ject? The answer will be found on page 79. 
Q. 1. Is this "mineral and vegetable" sub- 
ject located geographically? 

A. Could be 
Q. 2. Is it a building or part of a struc- 
ture? A. No 
Q. 3. Is it a manufactured article? A. Yes 
Q. 4. *Is it famous for its connection with 
a person? A. Yes 
Q. 5. Is this person living? A. No 
Q. 6. Was this person fictional? A. No 
Q. 7. Was he a military figure? A. No 
Q. 8. Was he an American ? A. Yes 
9. Was he an elected government of- 
ficial? A. No 
10. Was he an entertainer? A. No 
Was he an early Colonial American ? 

A. No 
Was he a Westerner ? A. No 

Did he live in the Twentieth Centurv ? 

A. Yes 
Was he connected with the govern- 
ment in any way? A. No 

15. Was he a scientist? A. Yes 

16. Was this subject an invention? A. Yes 

17. Was this a farm implement? A. No 

18. Was this something to be used in the 
home for pleasure? A. Yes 

19. Was this man Edison? A. Yes 

20. Was this his • ? 

(The panel guessed it . . . did you?) 

Originally a parlor game, Twenty 
Questions is now in its sixth year 
on the air and TV. This is a per- 
fect party game. Invent your own 
subjects, such as: A kiss (animal), 
MacArthur's corncob pipe (vege- 
table) , and the Golden Gate Bridge 
(mineral). 

T.Q. heard Sat., 8:00 PM, EDT, Mutual. 
Can be seen on DuMont stations, Fri., 8 
PM, EDT. Sponsored by the Mennen Co. 



11. 

12. 
13. 

14. 



Emcee Bill Slater and T.Q. panel regulars 



ore 



SUMMER 
FUN games 
next page 






59 







LU 



Strike it 
rich 







Strictly for fun . . . 
more radio, television 
games to help while 
away summer stay- 
at-home hours 



GO 




The pay-off . . . pro- 
ducer Walter Framer 
and M. C. Warren Hull 
congratulate Lt. E. J. 
Halter on his answers. 

Strike It Rich, 
Warren Hull's 
lively afternoon ques- 
tion session is known 
as the "quiz show 

with a heart" because contestants selected have 
a worthy need of the prize money. Each starts 
with fifteen dollars, and each must decide be- 
fore every question whether to risk all or part 
of his winnings. A correct answer doubles 
the amount placed on that question. Compare 
your luck and skill with a recent contestant. 
Start with fifteen points. See if you could 
have Struck It Rich ! Answers are on page 79. 

A quadruplegic Iwo Jima hero, seeking funds 
to help him get a house and whirlpool ma- 
chine, bet the limit and won on each of these. 
Was awarded $480 plus a $20 bonus. 

1. Shaker: A vibration of a portion of ground 
is called an earth what? 

2. Music Quiz: What orchestral instrument in 
its literal translation means "small" and is 
small? 

3. On Your Mettle: What is the name of a 
British Crown Colony in western Africa? 
There's metal in the name, so be on your 
mettle and name it. 

4. Star and Song: This famous star is a clar- 
inet-playing bandleader, a familiar sight in 
his battered top hat as he sings "When 
My Baby Smiles At Me." Who is he? 

5. Isle of Somewhere: There's a small island 
in the South Pacific with a population of 
two hundred and fifty. It has gigantic 
statues and archeological remains of un- 
known origins. It was discovered in 1772 
on a day in spring the Christian world 
celebrates with joy, and from this day 
got its name. What is it? 

6. Music Quiz: Are "lyrics" the words or 
music of a song? 

7. Word Wonders: Mildew is a kind of 
fungus. What is "curfew?" 

•Strike It Rich is heard M-F, 4 P. M. EDT, CBS. 
Seen CBS-TV, M-F, 11:30 A. M. EDT; Wed., 9 P. M. 
EDT. Sponsor: Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 



60 



Ever SINCE the founding of the institution, 
the bank, people have been trying to 
break it. Effective June 5, 1946, this was legal- 
ized by the arrival of the radio program, 
Break The Bank, followed two years later by 
the TV version. Now you need have no qualms. 
Go ahead and see if you can break this bank. 
You'll find the answers on page 79. 





the bank 




Emcees Bud Colly er and Bert 
Parks individually and collec- 
tively join a winner- finale. 




1. What famous actress emcees the radio pro- 
gram, The Big Show? 

2. Name the suave newspaper columnist who 
emcees Toast of The Town. 

3. Born in Huntington, West Virginia, this 
blonde Amazon has made a name for her- 
self on TV. Who is she? 

4. What famous husband and wife team won 
acclaim for their Halls of Ivy? 

5. Mary Livingstone is to Jack Benny what 
Portland Hoffa is to what famous come- 
dian? 

6. On what TV anti-crime program is Walter 
Greaza called "chief" by his agents? 

7. Name the two stars who portray the 
Bickersons on both TV and radio. 

8. What former pitching ace telecasts many 
of the New York Yankee's home games? 

9. Name the Senator who made TV history 
with his crime investigations. 

10. The beautiful wife of Rex Harrison is a 
TV star in her own right. Name her. 

11. Generally acknowledged to be the First 
Lady of Television, she recently became 
Mrs. Skitch Henderson. Who is she? 

12. Who is the noted hockey announcer who 
kibitzes emcee Bud Collyer on the radio 
version of Break The Bank? 

13. Name the actor who plays "Harrington" in 
Mr. District Attorney. 

14. This ex-barber makes the girls swoon on 
his Supper Club. Who is he? 

15. You Bet Your Life this quizmaster is 
quick on the quip. Name him. 

16. Who is the lone gal member of 
the regular Twenty Questions 
team? 

17. Name the late world-famed con- 
ductor whose Boston Symphony 
rehearsals were broadcast. 

18. What famous radio commenta- 
tor toured Tibet with his son? 

Break The Bank heard M-F, 11 A.M. EDT. 
NBC. Seen weekly NBC-TV. Consult 
your newspaper. Sponsor: Bristol-Myers. 








en 

LU 



Strike it 
rich 







Strictly for fun . . . 
more radio, television 
games to help while 
away summer stay- 
at-home hours 



CO 




The pay-off . . . pro- 
ducer Walter Framer 
andM.C. Warren Hull 
congratulate Lt. E. J. 
Halter on his answers. 

Strike It Rich, 
Warren Hull's 
lively afternoon ques- 
tion session is known 
as the "quiz show 

with a heart" because contestants selected have 
a worthy need of the prize money. Each starts 
with fifteen dollars, and each must decide be- 
fore every question whether to risk all or part 
of his winnings. A correct answer doubles 
the amount placed on that question. Compare 
your luck and skill with a recent contestant. 
Start with fifteen points. See if you could 
have Struck It Rich! Answers are on page 79. 

A quadruplegic Iwo Jima hero, seeking funds 
to help him get a house and whirlpool ma- 
chine, bet the limit and won ori each of these. 
Was awarded $480 plus a $20 bonus. 

1. Shaker: A vibration of a portion of ground 
is called an earth what? 

2. Music Quiz: What orchestral instrument in 
its literal translation means "small" and is 
small? 

3. On Your Mettle: What is the name of a 
British Crown Colony in western Africa? 
There's metal in the name, so be on your 
mettle and name it. 

4. Star and Song: This famous star is a clar- 
inet-playing bandleader, a familiar sight in 
his battered top hat as he sings "When 
My Baby Smiles At Me." Who is he? 

5. Isle of Somewhere: There's a small island 
in the South Pacific with a population of 
two hundred and fifty. It has gigantic 
statues and archeological remains of un- 
known origins. It was discovered in 1772 
on a day in spring the Christian world 
celebrates with joy, and from this day 
got its name. What is it? 

6. Music Quiz: Are "lyrics" the words or 
music of a song? 

7. Word Wonders: Mildew is a kind of 
fungus. What is "curfew?" 

Strike It Rich is heard M-F, 4 P. M. EDT, CBS. 
Seen CBS-TV, M-F, 11:30 A. M. EDT; Wed., 9 P. M. 
EDT. Sponsor: Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co. 




Break 
the bank 




Emcees BudC oily er and Bert 
Parks individually and collec- 
tively join a winner- finale. 



60 




EVER SINCE the founding of the institution, 
the bank, people have been trying to 
break it. Effective June 5, 1946. this was legal- 
ized by the arrival of the radio program, 
Break The Bank, followed two years later by 
the TV version. Now you need have no qualms. 
Go ahead and see if you can break (his bank. 
You'll find the answers on page 7 l ). 

1. What famous actress emcees the radio pro- 
gram, The Big Show? 

2. Name the suave newspaper columnist who 
emcees Toast of The Town. 

3. Born in Huntington, West Virginia, ibis 
blonde Amazon has made a name for her- 
self on TV. Who is she? 

4. What famous husband and wife team won 
acclaim for their Halls of Ivy? 

5. Mary Livingstone is to Jack Benny what 
Portland Holfa is to what famous come- 
dian? 

6. On what TV anti-crime program is Walter 
Greaza called "chief" by his agents? 

7. Name the two stars who portray the 
Bickersons on both TV and radio. 

8. What former pitching ace telecasts many 
of the New York Yankee's home games? 

9. Name the Senator who made TV history 
with his crime investigations. 

10. The beautiful wife of Rex Harrison is i 
TV star in her own right. Name her. 

11. Generally acknowledged to he the Firsl 
Lady of Television, she recently became 
Mrs. Skitch Henderson. Who is she? 

12. Who is the noted hockey announcer who 
kibitzes emcee Bud Collyer on the radio 
version of Break The Bank? 

13. Name the actor who plays "Harrington" in 
Mr. District Attorney. 

14. This ex-barber makes the girls swoon on 
his Supper Club. Who is Ik? 

15. You Bet Your Life this quizmaster is 
quick on the quip. Name him. 

16. Who is the lone gal member of 
the regular Twenty Questions 
team? 

17. Name the late world-famed con- 
ductor whose Boston Symphony 
rehearsals were broadcast. 

18. What famous radio commenta- 
tor toured Tibet with his son? 



Break The Bank heard M-F, 11 A M. EDT. 

NBC. Seen weekly NBC-TV. Con, U ll 
your newspaper. Sponsor: Brislol-Mwr,. 




.s 



s 



I I I 





It's a skillful blending of rec- 
ognizable past and present, fact 
and fiction, which makes you feel, 
when you see Hawkins Falls on 
TV, that this is somehow a reflec- 
tion of your own life. The skill in 
the blending is the skill of the 
actors and of the show's creators, 
writer Dong Johnson and producer 
Ben Park — who feel that everyone 
holds a small town in his heart — 
as nostalgic memory or hope for 
the future. 

The town of Hawkins Falls itself 
is the main character, but many 
of the citizens play important 
roles: Belinda Catherwood, self- 
elected defender of morality and 
culture and history . . . Knap and 
Lona Drewer and runaway Roy 
whom they adopted . . . Laif Flagle 
and Millie, his wife, whose 
poignant devotion* makes more so- 
phisticated citizens a trifle jealous 
. . . Jake Debrow, the know-it-all 
barber . . . Janet Weaver, Belinda 
Catherwood's niece . . Doc Gibbs, 
the educated hobo . . . Judge Sharp 
and Elmira Cleebe and Jonathan 
Kratz and so many others. Now 
that you've met them here you'll 
want to visit them daily in their 
own home town — which might well 
be your home or any town in the 
U.S.A.— Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200. 

Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200, may be seen 
Monday through Friday at 5 P.M. EDT, 
NBC-TV stations, sponsored by Surf. 




Belinda Catherwood's precise ways and 
unbending views on practically any subject 
that comes up are a trial to her 
niece, Janet Weaver, (Played by Hope 
Summers, Nancy Brougham.) Major 
Izzah Cornwallace, one of Hawkins Falls' 
settlers, was an ancestor of the 
history-venerating Miss Catherwood. 



Not a serial but a ™ television novel" — a 
warm story that touches heart and funnybone, 

with the town itself as the main character 



62 



Hoping to convince 
Belinda she should 
donate to Lodgeman's 
Fund, Jake (Les 
Spears) carries in 
her groceries, 
treats her to a few 
know-it-all opinions. 




In Hawkins Falls, says 
Lona (Bernardine Flynn, ) a 
mother knows a child's 
born with a fear of water 
— especially if it's on 
a washcloth! Roy (Bruce Dane) 
and Knap Drewer admit 
the truth of those words. 



The Danes' back porch 
makes a fine gathering 
place for a neighborly 
confab: Knap Drewer (Frank 
Dane,) Millie Flagle 
(Ros Twohy,) Janet Weaver. 
(Dane's real-life son 
is his show son as well.) 

Janet Weaver and Gillie, 
her chum (Jean Hawley,) 
are at the we'll-be-pals- 
forever-and- for ever 
stage. Getting around Aunt 
Belinda requires many 
a whispered conference in 
Janet's bedroom (far rt.) 





Most devoted couple 
in the town — Laif Flagle 
( Win Stracke ) and his 
wife, Millie. While she 
does the week's wash — 
old-fashioned style — he 
serenades the girl he 
loves more with each day. 

Conference of the 

staff and the cast. You 
haven't yet met the 
three men in foreground. 
They are writer 
Doug Johnson, announcer 
Hugh Downes and show's 
producer Ben Park. 




/ 



s 



& 



Po 



lawkins 
Falls, 
. 6200 




.^' 



s 



It's a skillful blending of rec- 
ognizable past and present, fact 
and fiction, which makes you feel, 
when you see Hawkins Falls on 
TV, that this is somehow a reflec- 
tion of your own life. The skill in 
the blending is the skill of the 
actors and of the show's creators, 
writer Doug Johnson and producer 
Ben Park— who feel that everyone 
holds a small town in his heart — 
as nostalgic memory or hope for 
the future. 

The town of Hawkins Falls itself 
is the main character, but many 
of the citizens play important 
roles: Belinda Catherwood, self- 
elected defender of morality and 
culture and history . . . Knap and 
Lona Drewer and runaway Roy 
whom they adopted . . . Laif Flagle 
and Millie, his wife, whose 
poignant devotion' makes more so- 
phisticated citizens a trifle jealous 
. . . Jake Debrow, the know-it-all 
barber . . . Janet Weaver, Belinda 
Catherwood's niece . . Doc Gibbs, 
the educated hobo . . . Judge Sharp 
and Elmira Cleebe and Jonathan 
Kratz and so many others. Now 
that you've met them here you'll 
want to visit them daily in their 
own home town — which might well 
be your home or any town in the 
U.S.A.— Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200. 

Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200, may be seen 
Monday through Friday at 5 P.M. EDT 
NBC-TV stations, sponsored by Surf! 



Hoping to convince 
Belinda she should 
donate to Lodgeman's 
Fund, Jake (Les 
Spears) carries in 
her groceries, 
treats her to a few 
know-it-all opinions. 



Not a serial but a "television novel 
warm story that touches heart and funny bone, 

with the town itself as the main character 



62 





In Hawkins Falls, says 
Lona (Bernardine Flynn,) a 

mother knows a child's 
born with a fear of water 
— especially if it's on 
a washcloth! Roy | Bruce Dane) 
and Knap Drciccr admit 
the truth of those words. 



The Danes' back porch 

makes a fine gathering 

place for a neighborly 

confab: Knap Drewer (Frank 

Dane,) Millie Flagle 

(Ros Twohy,) Janet Weaver. 

(Dane's real-life son -wi 4 

is his show son as well.) "~. 

Janet Weaver and Gillie, 
her chum (Jean Hawley,) 
are at the we'll-be-pals- 
forever-and- forever 
stage. Getting around Aunt 
Belinda requires many 
a whispered conference in 
Janet's bedroom (far rt.) 



Belinda Catherwood's precise ways and 
unbending views on practically any subject 
that comes up are a trial to her 
niece, Janet Weaver, (Played by Hope 
Summers, Nancy Brougham.) Major 
Izzah CornwaUace, one of Hawkins ro« 
settlers, was an ancestor of the 
history-venerating Miss Catherwood. 




Most devoted couple 
in the town — Laif Flagle 
(Win Stracke) and his 
wife, Millie. While she 
does the week's wash — 
old-fashioned style — he 
serenades the girl he 
loves more with each day. 

Conference of the 

staff and the cast. You 
haven't yet met the 
three men in foreground. 
They are writer 
Doug Johnson, announcer 
Hugh Downes and show's 
producer Ben Park. 






ildlife Quiz 

By Sgt. Preston 

If you'd like to do some reading that's a 
lot more fascinating than fiction, just try 
books about animals. Here's a sample of what 
I mean, in the form of a little quiz: 

a) One particular bird has such keen sight it 
can spot a field mouse in the grass while fly- 
ing at terrific height. What bird is it? 

b) If you've gone fishing, you've probably 
dug worms for bait. Bet you don't know how 
big earthworms grow in Australia? 

c) Ever been curious about how fast some of 
the wild creatures can move? Take a guess at 
these — mule-deer, jack rabbit, swallow. 

d) This is really hard to believe, though it's 
true. Know a large animal who actually lands 
on his head when he jumps? 

e) Ever hear stories about animals sleeping 
with one eye open? Know what mammal, 
found in Africa, never closes its eyes? 

Here are the answers: (a) It's the hawk 
who has such keen eyesight, (b) Down there, 
earthworms grow as much as twelve feet 
long! (c) The mule-deer can travel at 35 
miles an hour. Jack rabbits' speedometers hit 
45. The swallow's really a speedster — 110 
m.p.h. !. (d) Biggest sheep in the world, the 
Argali, lands on its head, (e) The African 
elephant shrew even sleeps with its eyes wide 
open! (You can hear Sgt. Preston on Chal- 
lenge of the Yukon on Sundays at 6 P.M. 
EDT, over MBS stations.) 



— 




a plain Video 
on Planet l-X'7 



Captain Video, adventurer in space travel 
of the future, champion of right, is seen M-F 
at 7 P.M. EDT on DuMont TV stations. In 
these pictures, just as you saw them on TV, 
Al Hodge is Captain Video, Don Hastings is 
the Video Ranger, Hal Conklin is Dr. Pauli, 
Natalie Core is Queen Karola, Kem Dibbs is 
Geral, John Martin is Asbek, Walter Black 
is Kaan and Nat Polen is Maha. 

When this Captain Video adventure starts, 
Dr. Pauli, the Captain's arch enemy, is hid- 
ing out at the home of Professor Nyari, well 
known Egyptologist. As the doctor and the 
professor look through some old hieroglyphic 
tablets, Dr. Pauli discovers and deciphers a 
fantastic ancient formula for the most power- 
ful force in the world. He decides to move his 
operations to Planet l-X-7— taking the tablet 
with him — where he can construct the neces- 
sary intricate machines to create this force, 
use it to conquer the world. 

Captain Video receives reports from his 
space agents that Dr. Pauli's rocket ship is on 
the way to Planet l-X-7. Immediately he calls 
in the Video Ranger, and together they take 
off in their super-rocket ship. Meanwhile, Dr. 
Pauli has landed on Planet l-X-7 and started 
construction. Dressed in the costume of the 
planet he comes up from underground retreat 
to scan the heavens for signs of danger. Cap- 
tain Video approaches, releases his emer- 
gency rations rocket, preparing to land. Dr. 
Pauli is knocked out by the concussion of the 
landing rocket. His faithful aide, Corin, see- 
ing this, quickly goes underground to report 
to Queen Karola, who reigns over Planet 
l-X-7. Fearing that Captain Video will dis- 
cover Dr. Pauli, she tells Corin to go back 
and rescue him. 

Now, follow the rest of this adventure 
through the pictures at the right: 



1. Captain Video and 
the Ranger land. Armed 
with Atomic Rifle, Cos- 
mic Ray Vibrator, wear- 
ing atmosphere suits, 
they spot the footprints 
of Dr.Pauli.Using inter- 
space radio they notify 
agents to close in, then 
they go underground. 

2. Exploring caves 
leads Captain Video to 
throne room of Queen 
Karola. He finds Geral, 
the Martian space Cap- 
tain, also trying to track 
down Pauli. Ranger ra- 
dios that Pauli has es- 
caped in their ship, sends 
solar-system-wide alarm. 

3. Geral and Captain 
Video join forces, start 
back to Earth. On Venus, 
Asbek of Jupiter and 
Kaan of Mars instruct 
Maha of Eos to go to 
Earth, for Maha becomes 
invisible at will. Pauli 
has landed on Earth with 
Captain Video in pursuit. 

4. Playing the hunch 
that Pauli has returned 
to the professor's home, 
Captain Video and the 
Ranger look through ev- 
ery room, but Dr. Pauli 
has put on his Cloak of 
Invisibility. He corners 
them and mercilessly pre- 
pares to immobilize them. 

5. Suddenly the help- 
less Captain and Ranger 
hear sounds of struggle, 
and the gun clatters to 
the floor. The situation is 
saved as Dr. Pauli comes 
from invisibility, held in 
the steel grip of Maha, 
the only one who is able 
to penetrate the Cloak! 




65 



From north of the 
border comes 
a daytime serial of 
great warmth 
telling the story of 
one woman's 




voyage 



PRODUCED in Canada, with all 
Canadian actors, Brave Voyage 
tells the story of Helen Marsh, a 
young schoolteacher in a small 
town near Toronto. Having been 
brought up to believe she was an 
orphan, Helen discovers that her 
father, Mr. Manning, is still alive, 
but in prison on false charges. In- 
vestigating the circumstances in his 
case, she manages to clear him of all 
guilt and he is released. Now Helen 
finds herself reliving the same night- 
mare; her husband, Gordon, a 
prominent writer, has been falsely 
convicted of murder. 

Helen, convinced' that Dickie 
Schuyler is guilty of the crime, ap- 
peals to the governor, but all she 
can obtain is a promise that the 
matter will be taken under advise- 
ment. Desperate, she decides to try 
to make Dickie confess his crime by 
confronting him with her knowledge 
of it. Dickie's reaction only confirms 
her suspicion, but now Helen finds 
her life endangered by this man who 
has already murdered one woman. 

Brave Voyage is heard M-F, 2 P.M. EDT. 
CBC Trans-Canada, sponsored by Rinso. 





Mimi, a favorite with 
all Brave Voyage 
listeners, proudly poses 
for her picture. 

Left, Gordon Marsh and 
his wife, Helen (John 
Scott and Beth Lockerbie), 
discuss a new episode. 

The cast: Emily Wiley, 
Helen's best friend 

(Peggy Brown) ; Mrs. Harris, 
the Marshs' housekeeper 

(Jane Mallett) ; 
Helen, Gordon and Mr. 
Manning (Syd Brown). 



66 



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67 



MANSON AS THE VILLAINOUS NERO 




ne man s 



FINALLY, IN CASE YOU'RE CURIOUS — AS HIMSELF. 



You've seen Maurice Manson in dozens 
of TV shows, but you've probably 
never once recognized him as the same 
man you saw before — the man with as 
many different faces and personalities as 
he has roles. 

Most of the historical figures you see on 
TV — anyone from Nero to Napoleon — are 
portrayed by Manson. To prepare for the 
make-up job on these exceptionally diffi- 
cult roles he usually spends several hours 
in the Public Library picture file, study- 
ing the face from all angles. 

The voice to be used, for any role, is 
another problem Manson has to face. If 
possible he listens to recordings of the 



person he is to portray so that he may 
come as close as possible to actual speech. 
Imagination often has to take over on its 
own, however, for Manson has been called 
on to play parts ranging from the voice of 
a telephone receiver to a talking cocker 
spaniel. 

Actual research finally over, Manson ar- 
rives at the studio about four hours early 
to put on his own make-up. Noses, ears, 
face lines, require careful and slow appli- 
cation. If an authentic wig is not avail- 
able he often has to glue his hair on strand 
by strand. 

Once the face is on, there still remains 
the costume problem. Manson keeps his 



own equipment — paddings, corsets, even 
lifts. He has suits to make him look fat- 
ter or thinner, suits that make him look 
like a gangster and others in which he 
looks like what the well-dressed man will 
wear. 

But as drastic as the changes are on the 
outside, the change on the inside has to be 
equally great. Manson will accept a part 
only if he believes he can fit it mentally as 
well as physically. So well does he suit 
the parts he does play, however, that 
after watching one of his recent TV per- 
formances, his mother made the classic 
remark : "Son, you were wonderful — which 
one were you?" 



A face that only a mother could love — but probably wouldn't recognize 



68 



J^W 



— 



€. 



Easy to be 



? 



says CLAUDETTE 



y 



M 



Starring in 

"THUNDER ON THE HILL" 

A Universal-Inter national Picture 

"My beauty facials really make skin softer, smoother" 



:# 



•««r. 



"I've found Lux Soap 
facials really make skin 
lovelier," says glamor- 
ous Claudette Colbert. 
It's such an easy 
beauty care, but one I 
know I can depend 011. 
Here's all you do: 



"First work the creamy 
lather well in. Lux has 
Active lather that 
cleanses thoroughly but 
ever so gently. Rinse 
with warm water, then 
splash freely with cold. 
Pat dry with a towel. 



"Now my skin feels 
softer, smoother!" 
Why don't you take 
Claudette Colbert's tip? 
Try this gentle care 
screen stars recom- 
mend. You'll agree — it's 
easy to be Lux-lovely I 






69 



CHOOSE A DREAMY GUY 



(Continued from page 32) unknown dream 
man — for we'd been dating a year by that 
time, and Bill fits the description to perfec- 
tion. Only three months after that article 
was printed came Christmas time — and 
Bill proved his sentimentality by gifting me 
with a pin that I'd admired in a shop win- 
dow the summer before! Moreover, he too 
wants to live in New York City because he 
too was brought up here. And he is tele- 
vision and radio director of Warwick and 
Legler Advertising Agency — and for years 
before entering the agency, he prepared 
for it by holding all kinds of jobs in the 
entertainment world. Of course I think 
he's bright, humorous, and completely 
wonderful — so that (somewhat) covers 
Mr. Warwick. 

You can see that when it comes to mar- 
riage, a man-hater is just as delirious as 
any other wife — over her own dreamy 
man! What else could she be, when every- 
one we know has pitched in to make us 
as happy as possible? 

For instance, neither Bill nor I will 
ever forget the midnight we returned 
from our honeymoon. Hot, rumpled and 
exhausted from a long flight from Florida, 
we unlocked the door of our brand-new 
apartment, expecting to face six dark and 
dusty rooms — and we knew, all too well, 
what little furniture studded those rooms: 
a bed, two night tables, two chests of 
drawers, and (in the living-room) a sofa 
and coffee table. You can imagine our de- 
lighted astonishment when we found that 
our mothers had been there earlier, getting 
'things ready ... so, while our sparse 
furniture was still sparse, we stepped into 
a living-room with lights going, flowers ar- 
ranged in bowls, and a tray laid out with 
cold drinks and sandwiches. In the bed- 
room, we found more flowers — and in the 
kitchen, we found an ice-box fully stocked 
for meals the next day ! With such thought- 
fulness on the parts of our mothers, our 
"real life" got off to a marvelous start. 
Naturally, we stayed up until dawn eat- 
ing sandwiches and admiring our new 
home. 

Our friends have been equally thought- 
ful, before the wedding ever took place. 
All the girls on Leave It to the Girls had 
out-done themselves at a shower for me, 
for instance. Maggi McNeills presented 
me with a linen breakfast set with the 
note, "This is for when he cooks you 
breakfast in bed." That'll be the day!) 
Robin Chandler gifted me practically 
with a cute yellow garbage pail. Dorothy 
Kilgallen gave me a luncheon set with a 
card that read, "This is so you can have 
us all to lunch when you get back from 
your honeymoon — for a conference on 
married life." Producer Martha Rountree 
gave me an ice bucket — and as a result of 
that kitchen shower, my kitchen is the 
one room of the house that is fully fur- 
nished! It has everything you can imagine, 
from Waring mixers to a rolling pin (this 
last being a gag present from my ten- 
year-old nephew). I will also add, here 
and now, that I can cook. The only 
thing I haven't yet made for Bill is a cake, 
n and I'm dying to try one. 
M Our two hundred wedding presents were 
all sensational too — although it'll be the 
year '82 before I get through writing 



thank-you notes. For instance, Tex and 
Jinx gave us a double silver picture frame, 
with the name "Eloise" engraved on one 
side, and "Bill" on the other. Ed and 
Pegeen Fitzgerald presented us with a 
darling gift: a gold key for our front door. 
Then, too, we got dozens of gifts from 
stranger-friends — the people who watch 
me on television. From these nice people 
came, among other things, napkins with 
hand-crocheted edges, a beautiful cro- 
cheted doily, some blue and yellow pot- 
holders, and even a picture of me, framed! 

And how could a man-hater resist my 
wedding — which I thought was beautiful 
naturally! We were married at four- 
thirty in the afternoon last April 6th, at 
St. Ignatius Loyola Church at 84th Street 
and Park Avenue in New York City — and 
over a thousand people jammed into the 
church. (There were so many that they 
were even out on the sidewalk.) This 
crowd was made up of friends and listen- 
ers . . . and proved that if we'd asked 
everyone we wanted to the reception after- 
ward, we'd have had to rent Madison 
Square Carden! 

Instead, our reception was small and 
limited mainly to members of our families. 
It was held at the home of Mrs. 0. J. 
Sterling — otherwise known as my sister 
Dorothy. New York's Mayor Impelliteri 
came, and my uncle Admiral Carl Fink, 
and Ilka Chase, and dozens of cousins, 
aunts and uncles of both Bill's and mine. 
Afterward we left on our honeymoon. 
I'm proud to say that my honeymoon 
trousseau was perfectly matched — al- 
though why I'll never know, since I'd buy 
a green dress four weeks before I'd get 
a chance to buy the shoes that went with 
it! I'm also proud to announce that I 
managed, by bouncing vigorously on suit- 







Eloise has a large collection 
of tiny, delicate cups and saucers. 
Her husband adds to the display 
whenever he comes home from a trip. 



cases, to get everything into two suit- 
cases and a face case. 

Then we were off on a two-week honey- 
moon that turned out to be as hectic as 
the way I talk on television. We went 
first to St. John's in the Virgin Islands, 
a wonderful honeymoon spot. There were 
only eight cottages on the whole island, 
all of them removed from the others and 
surrounded by tremendous porches. If 
we wanted maid service, a maid would 
materialize out of the scenery — and if 
we wanted to see people, we could go to 
the commissary in the center of the island 
to buy food and to meet the other people 
there. Mostly, of course, we lay on our 
own private beach soaking up the sun- 
shine. 

After four days there, we went to St. 
Thomas Island to the Virgin Isle Hotel, 
which is the last word in chic hotels 
anywhere (they even sent champagne and 
fruit to our room). Then we were off 
for Havana, with a one-hour stopover in 
San Juan — long enough, we proved, to get 
to the new Caribe-Hilton Hotel for lunch 
and still get back to the plane! In Ha- 
vana, we stayed at the Nacional Hotel, 
and saw the entire island with a wonderful 
Cuban driver named Mike. Then we went 
to Palm Beach, Florida, for twenty-four 
hours (and two parties in our honor) be- 
fore flying back to New York City and our 
"settled" life. 

As I say, marriage for a man-hater who 
only hates men thirty minutes a week is 
as wonderful as it is for other (lucky) 
wives. And for Bill and me, it has been 
much as we expected, because we didn't 
rush hysterically into it. We'd known each 
other a good year and a half — in fact, 
during our courtship we'd introduced a 
couple who got married and even had a 
baby before we got around to signing 
our marriage license! This long wait was 
due to the fact that both of us wanted to 
be sure we were entering a lifetime part- 
nership. By the time we were formally 
engaged — last December 16th, when he 
gave me my ring — we were both positive 
that we were. 

I first met Bill in highly unromantic 
circumstances, at the National Broad- 
casting Company. One morning, my di- 
rector and I were winding up rehearsals 
on a daily radio show I was then doing. 
Just as we finished for the day, the door 
of the studio opened and Bill Warwick 
walked in — he was a new NBC director, 
and still getting acquainted. We were in- 
troduced, and we lunched together. For 
the next three days Bill worked on my 
show with me. Then he asked me out on 
a date, and we've been going out ever 
since. During the eighteen months we 
went together, we discovered that we en- 
joyed many of the same things — parties at 
friends' homes, night clubs, amusement 
parks, and of course visiting each other's 
families. Both of us loved television, and 
loved to go out, and loved people. 

We also loved giving each other pres- 
ents. You've already heard about Bill's 
last Christmas gift to me — that long-re- 
membered pin. But we gave each other 
dozens of mad little gifts, right along. 
He gave me some of those China kissing 
bugs, and a set of little China animals; 
I gave him some kissing rabbits, and gag 
books like How to Play Golf. Also, he 
knew that I collected after-dinner coffee 
cups — and everytime he returned from a 












business trip anywhere, he brought me 
a new cup for my collection. Months 
ago, too, he gave me a gold "13" for my 
charm bracelet — because 13 was the 
number of his plane when Captain War- 
wick was a fighter-pilot during the war. 
And I found out that he was not only 
thoughtful about presents — but about such 
things as telephoning when he knew he'd 
be late for a date. 

Actually, there is only one thing about 
Bill's tastes that doesn't jibe with mine — 
he's an outdoor man, who thoroughly 
enjoys every sport, while I'm in my ele- 
ment on a sofa. Now, I like swimming, 
and I have enough sense not to be crashed 
in the head by a boom when sailing — but 
as for tennis and riding, I've already told 
Bill that I'll be glad to welcome him 
home. He's agreed to let me stay off 
horses and tennis-courts; but he's deter- 
mined to teach me golf, and I've had to 
give in on it. So don't be surprised to 
see me batting my way out of sand-traps 
from now on — -remembering that, if I can 
ever break 100, my father-in-law has prom- 
ised to give me a matched set of clubs. 



Yes, I find marriage a fine institution. 
We both like to sleep late in the 
mornings, and on Sundays we like to 
poop around in old clothes. Bill's handy 
around the house, and while he's happily 
putting up hooks in the kitchen, I'm con- 
tentedly arranging closets — with frills on 
the shelf-edges, and everything stacked 
neatly. Both of us stage a wild celebration 
over each new piece of furniture that final- 
ly reaches our empty apartment; our plan 
; s for semi-modern furniture, a beige- 
white-and-blue color scheme, and plenty of 
comfort. Of course we'll have two television 
sets, one in the living room and one in the 
library. 

My "career" doesn't interfere with my 
married life at all — even though I'm now 
doing a brand-new weekly radio program, 
Musical Merry-Go-Round (starting a week 
after my honeymoon), as well as my 
three usual television shows, Eloise Salutes 
the Stars, Leave It to the Girls, and Quick 
on the Draw. But everything blends. 

Last week, for instance, I finished a 
personal appearance and rushed into a 
supermarket to buy dinner supplies. I 
was all done up in my new Navy blue 
suit, my initialed blouse, white felt hat, 
stone martens and a huge orchid . . . 
but nevertheless I was wheeling a wire 
basket around and loading it high with 
groceries. Shortly a few other housewives 
gathered around — strangers to me, but 
very nice ones — and asked, "Well, Eloise, 
how do you like this marriage routine?" 
I held out my hands, with the nails all 
chipped from tearing open wedding pres- 
ents, and said, "I love it, even though 
it's left its mark on me — why, it's no prob- 
lem at all!" 

Bill seems to feel the same way about 
our marriage. Recently a friend asked 
him, "How can you get a word in edge- 
wise, married to Eloise?" 

He said, "I can talk almost as fast 
as she can — and I can do it louder!" 

It isn't, either ... as I say, girls, if 
you insist on marrying, be sure to do what 
I did: and pick one of the dreamy ones! 




71 




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GRACIE KNOWS BEST 



(Continued from page 30) "We don't do 
anything alike. After all, we spend so 
much of our working time together, we'd 
probably kill one another if we shared all 
our leisure time, too. I like outdoor sports, 
spend a lot of time on the golf course. But 
Gracie can't stand the sun. I like bridge. 
Gracie doesn't play. You know Gracie — 
her hobby is window shopping, and her 
country club is Sak's." 

That's how it is. George goes off with 
the boys to Hillcrest Country Club. Gracie 
heads for Wilshire Boulevard with the 
girls. They get home at night, George 
tells Gracie about that approach shot on 
the eighth that Sarazen in his prime never 
pulled off any better. Gracie tells George 
about the darling little blue silk with the 
silver buttons she picked up for peanuts. 
Everybody's happy. 



Gracie tells a story to point it up. 
"We envied the Mortimers. They 
seemed to have the ideal marriage. Always 
together, sharing every moment, every in- 
terest. We thought maybe there was some- 
thing wrong with us, the way we like to do 
separate things. One day the Mortimers 
were having breakfast. Mr. M. said, 'Please 
pass the salt.' His wife said, T want a di- 
vorce!' So now George and I don't wonder 
any more — we know we've got the system ! " 

Just the same, some Beverly Hills neigh- 
bors who've glanced in the windows as 
they passed the Burns house recently 
(that's one of the outdoor sports here, like 
golf and window shopping) have whispered 
that things may not be so good with George 
and Gracie after all. There's George in 
one room, muttering to himself. There's 
Gracie in another room, muttering to her- 
self. What d'you know, the Burnses aren't 
speaking! 

Sure they're speaking, same as always. 
They're just rehearsing lines for their TV 
show. "It's this way," George explains. 
"We play only one scene together . while 
the rest of the scenes are with other peo- 
ple. I'd be feeding Gracie everybody's lines 
but my own — and probably end up re- 
membering everybody's but my own." 

"It wouldn't be fair," Gracie says with 
a twinkle, "for poor George to have to 
memorize the whole show. And," she adds 
with modest pride, "that one scene we do 
together, we don't have to practice at 
home ! Why, we know each other's ways so 
well we can just feel out that scene!" 

George and Gracie cast a unanimous 
vote on television. They're crazy about it. 
"It's like a new lease on the profession," 
George tells everyone who'll hold still long 
enough. "It's being in the theater again. 
We've got the live feeling radio never 
gives." 

"No," Gracie puts in. "You couldn't ad 
lib in radio without rattling the paper. In 
television you're real people. And the au- 
dience feels it. They know you can make 
a mistake because you're human, and if 
you do — so they like you for it." 

George points out that TV is like the 
stage or vaudeville. Video performers 
don't have, aren't expected to have, the 
glossy perfection of the movies. "So we 
don't all come out looking like Dolores Del 
Rio. Nobody minds. But sure, there are 



problems. When you haven't acted before 
an audience for a long time, you can even 
forget how to pick up a telephone. The 
darn thing looks at you and you look at 
it, and you wish they'd give you a bulletin 
on these new inventions ahead of time. But 
pretty soon you get used to it again and, 
the way you did on the stage, you find 
you're having a swell time and so's the 
audience." 

In any Burns and Allen audience hav- 
ing a swell time you'll find J. Benny in the 
front row. There's something about George 
that gets you — just a look at that sour 
puss — before he opens his mouth. Even 
if I do laugh so hard I ruin his jokes be- 
fore he finishes them, George still says 
I'm his best audience. I think I can say 
that I'm known in these parts as one who 
offers a mite of competition to anyone in 
the comedian racket, but I'll doff my 
toupee to George any day. 

Come to think of it, this is pretty white 
of me. Ask George about me and he'll tell 
you some outrageous stories. In fact, 
they've grown so awful over the years 
George has been telling them, that even he 
is beginning to get insulted for me. 

That's George's long suit, insulting his 
friends, and because I'm about the oldest 
friend I take the worst roasting. I'd guess 
we've been pals for around twenty-eight 
years, George and I. I've even forgotten, 
it's been so long, how we came to meet in 
the first place. That's not important — 
what is, I think, is that we've both hoed 
the long row to success without losing 
track of each other. George and I used to 
share a room back in the old vaudeville 
days. When he married Gracie, I had to 
move out and take a single which made, I 
remember, quite a hole in my budget. Our 
paths have been crossing ever since. In 
vaudeville we often played the same bill. 
In radio we guested on each other's shows. 
Now, since we've got our feet wet in tele- 
vision, we still exchange appearances. It's 
no act, either — we don't show before an 
audience and then forget each other in 
between. Many's the B & A business con- 
ference I've been asked to sit in on, and 
George is always ready to rally around 
with help and advice if I need them. 



George has developed terrifically as 
a comedian since the old days. 
Darn him, you can't top him! Not profes- 
sionally or socially, either. In our gang — 
which includes, besides George and Gracie 
and Mary and me, the William Goetzes, 
Claudette Colbert and her husband Joel 
Pressman, Danny Kaye and his wife, the 
Charles Vidors, Barbara Stanwyck — 
George shines as the brightest star. We 
hang on his every insult. (But we know 
they're only for laughs. George never gets 
mad at anyone, really loves everybody.) 

Years ago, I gave up trying to beat 
George to the punch. It's a waste of time. 
Like George and Gracie's wedding night, 
back in 1926. They were in Cleveland and 
I was playing San Francisco, so I hadn't 
been in on the festivities. I felt I should 
rectify this by a friendly telephone call — 
along about three a.m. I got my gag all 
worked out and put through the call. Man's 
voice answers. "Hello, George?" I say. 






— "> <*■ 






w 



"Send up two orders ham and eggs," he 
growls, and slam goes the phone, leaving 
me with my mouth hanging open. 

I finally got my own back, though. It 
took years, but I made it. George and 
Grade went to England two years ago to 
play the Palladium. The night before their 
opening, I flew to London as a surprise. I 
put up at the same hotel and, with Jane 
Wyman, who was in England then, play- 
ing the operator, we called George, Jane 
making sure the call sounded as if I were 
still home. We talked a few minutes, with 
me wishing George lots of luck on the 
opening. As soon as I'd hung up, I strolled 
into the next room, where George was tell- 
ing everyone how sweet it was of his old 
pal to call and wish him luck. He looked 
up and saw me. I don't care if I never do 
another thing to George — the memory of 
the look on his face will last me a lifetime. 



Good as they always were at whatever 
they turned their hand to, I think 
George and Gracie have topped their pre- 
vious best now that they're in TV. George 
holds the show together as if he carried it 
around in his pocket, and Grade's timing 
and naive delivery are great. They've devel- 
oped the perfect formula for themselves, 
and TV's their medium, no doubt about it. 
Not an easy medium, either. (Don't I know 
t! I knocked my brains out doing four 
V shows last season. I couldn't do a 
eekly, or even a bi-weekly television 
show, and keep on with radio, too.) 

The use of repetitious gags, for instance, 
is pretty well limited in TV. Like the laugh 
George and Gracie used to close their act 
with, in vaudeville days. Gracie would 
wander across the stage with a piece of 
apple pie in her -hands. When George 
asked why, she'd say, "You never know 
when you're going to meet a piece of 
cheese." A good gag — but in TV you can 
only pull it once and it's dead. (Just as 
well, Gracie says, "It's all for the best — 
I used to gain a lot of weight, eating that 
pie every night to keep it from going to 
waste.") 

George and Gracie, besides working out 
a sure-fire formula, have shown wonderful 
judgment in picking a solid supporting 
cast. Bill Goodwin is one of the best, and 
Bea Benadaret and Fred Clark are perfect 
as the Mortons, their neighbors. Fred is 
Bea's third husband in the role of neigh- 
bor Harry Morton. "I tell all the girls," 
Gracie says, "that TV's a good way to get 
a husband!" 

The Burns and Allen video show is a 
full-time business for George. With his 
writers — Harvey Helm, Sid Dorfman, Paul 
Henning and brother Willy Burns — George 
always keeps one show ahead. The day 
following a program, George and the 
writers huddle in their office near Holly- 
wood and Vine, spending whatever time is 
necessary working out show-after-next's 
story line — based, always, on something 
simple that will offer a lot of laughs when 
developed. Then they scatter, to work 
separately on what they've dreamed up, un- 
til the following Friday. Between writing 
sessions, though, no one's idle. That week 
is spent in constant rehearsals with the en- 
tire cast, anywhere from one to four hours 
a day, of the up-coming show. Following 
the Thursday performance, George and the 
writers meet again, read over what they've 



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produced separately during the week. On 
Monday they begin putting it together and 
by the following Thursday night they have 
a completed show. Then comes Friday 
and the whole routine starts over. 

Because he's both actor and interlocuter, 
George's part is lengthy — but he says that 
Gracie's is more difficult from a memoriz- 
ing standpoint. Come to think about it, 
that's probably true. In the case of George 
and the others, there are cues to work 
from. But Gracie's lines don't depend on 
any one else's. For instance, George might 
ask, "How do you feel tonight, Gracie?" 
and her answer, instead of the easy-to-re- 
member, "Fine, thanks," can be anything 
as far-fetched as, "Isn't it too bad about 
Blanche's sister's husband's little boy's 
cat's kittens?" 

Ask Gracie if she has trouble memoriz- 
ing and she'll just make a face at you and 
shrug her shoulders. But according to the 
people on the set, she's the first one to 
have her lines letter perfect. Although 
George is in charge of writers and ideas, 
Gracie gets in her important two-cents'- 
worth all along. It's always been that 
way, with their radio show as well. George 
and the writers work up a script, and then 
they try it out on Gracie because her judg- 
ment is good on everything. She knows 
what's funny, she knows what's in good 
taste, and she knows what's in-character 
for her to say. On the set, too, Gracie 
seems to sense anything that will be out of 
key when it meets the feminine eye — which 
is always cocked, as is natural with the 
female, to spot mistakes — and her ideas 
are never overlooked. So Gracie has the 
last word and from the smoothness of the 
show you can tell that George is right to 
work on the Gracie-knows-best principle. 

Everyone they work with likes and re- 
spects George and Gracie. They're easy- 
going people, but perfectionists about the 
show. George is the more out-spoken of 
the pair, and Gracie, who's rather shy, 
likes it that way. She looks to him to do 
the official talking. Gracie's a worrier about 
how she's going to look. She shouldn't be 
— whenever and wherever you meet her, 
she's perfectly turned-out, looks great. 

The idea for a Burns and Allen TV show 
was hatched at a luncheon at Romanoff's. 
George was sold immediately, eager to get 
to work, but Gracie wasn't so sure. George 
had to kid her into it, but now she's de- 
lighted. George, of course, thinks it's 
great. Gives people a chance to recognize 



them, he says. "Now that we're being 
again, people know who we are by just 
looking at us." 

That lovable old ham has a wonderful 
time playing to the audience. Timid Gracie 
— and it's no act — plays to the four walls 
of the set. (Very retiring, Gracie is, as a 
matter of fact. There's the time they still 
tell about at CBS, for instance. Ordinary 
TV show rehearsal, it was — everything in 
a state of orderly confusion, with people 
running off in all directions and coming 
back a few minutes later for their heads. 
Presently Gracie's absence was noticed 
and a posse went in search of her. She 
was discovered, some time later, huddled 
under one of the big cameras. Said she, 
defensively, as she was hauled out, "It was 
cool down there!") 

Of course, the Burnses' two youngsters, 
Ronald and Sandra, watch Mom and Pop 
on TV. Although they're away at Chad- 
wick, a private school about forty miles 
out of town, they see the kinescopes when 
they come home every other weekend. 
"Ronnie always say it's great," Gracie tells 
you, "because Ronnie's a good politician." 

"Or wants something," George adds. 

"Sandy's more critical," says Gracie. 

"She also is full of suggestions," George 
puts in. "And they all turn out to be 
friends of hers." 

One of George's big weaknesses — except 
that he can turn it into a gag, so it's an 
asset after all— is his poor memory for 
names. To give you an idea, there was 
the time when George and Gracie were 
starting a new radio series, a few years 
back. The sponsor's advertising agency 
planned an all-out campaign and sent one 
of their top publicity representatives to 
work with George and Gracie on it. This 
guy, Carroll Nye, had been in pictures in 
previous years. He literally moved in with 
the Burnses, stayed at their home for 
weeks working with them on the campaign. 
At one point, George and Gracie managed 
to escape. They were enjoying a movie 
when Nye's face flashed on the screen. 

George nudged Gracie. "Look! There's 
what's-his-name — you know, him, the fel- 
low who's living with us!" 

Sure, I admire George. I think he's tops 
in the laugh racket. I think he's tops as 
a great guy. But maybe here's the real rea- 
son we've remained close friends through 
all the ups and downs of nearly thirty 
years — my name and Gracie's are the only 
ones he can remember! 




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Program 

highlights 

in television 

viewing 



New York City and Suburbs August 11 — September 10 
Baseball Schedule tor Television Viewing 

DATE TIME GAME CHANNEL 



Saturday, Aug. 11 


1:30 P.M. 


Boston vs. Dodgers 


9 






Phila. vs. Giants 


11 


Sunday, Aug. 12 


2:00 P.M. 


Boston vs. Dodgers 


9 




2:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 


11 


Monday, Aug. 13 


1:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Giants 


11 


Tuesday, Aug. 14 


8:30 P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Wed. & Thurs., 


1:30 P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Aug. 15-16 








Friday, Aug. 17 


8:30 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Yankees 


11 


Sat. & Sun., 


2:00 P.M. 


Phila. vs. Yankees 


5 & 11 


Aug. 18-19 








Tuesday, Aug. 21 


1:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 


Wednesday, Aug. 22 


1:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 






Cin'ati vs. Giants 


11 


Thursday, Aug. 23 


1:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. D'gers 


9 


Friday, Aug. 24 


1:30 P.M. 


St. Louis vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


Chi'go vs. Dodgers 


9 


Saturday, Aug. 25 


1:30 P.M. 


Chicago vs. Dodgers 


9 






St. Louis vs. Giants 


11 


Sunday, Aug. 26 


2:00 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. D'gers 


9 






Chicago vs. Giants* 


11 


Monday, Aug. 27 


8:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. D'gers 


9 


Tues. & Wed. 


1:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. D'gers 


9 


Aug. 28-29 




Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 


Thursday, Aug. 30 


1:30 P.M. 


Pitts, vs. Giants 


11 




8:30 P.M. 


Cin'ati vs. D'gers 


9 


Saturday, Sept. 1 


1:30 P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Sunday Sept. 2 


2:30 P.M. 


Dodgers vs. Giants 


11 


Monday, Sept. 3 


1:30 P.M. 


Boston vs. D'gers* 


9 






Phil. vs. Giants* 


11 


Wednesday, Sept. 5 


8:30 P.M. 


Phil. vs. Dodgers 


9 






Boston vs Yankees 


11 


Thursday, Sept. 6 


1:30 P.M. 


Phil. vs. Dodgers 


9 




2:30 P.M. 


Boston vs. Yankees 


5 & 11 


Friday, Sept. 7 


1:30 P.M. 


Phil. vs. Dodgers 


9 




2:30 P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


5 & 11 


Saturday, Sept. 8 


1:30 P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 




2:00 P.M. 


Wash. vs. Yankees 


5 & 11 


Sunday, Sept. 9 


2:00 P.M. 


Giants vs. Dodgers 


9 






Wash. vs. Yankees 


5 & 11 



* Doubleheader 

Announcers and sportscasters for the Giant games include Russ 
Hodges and Ernie Harwell ; for the Yankee games, Mel Allen, 
Dizzy Dean and Art Gleason; for the Dodger games, Red 
Barber, Connie Desmond and Vince Scully. 




1:30 P.M. Garry Moore Show • 2 

Durward Kirby and the gang with Garry, who 
went from radio writing to jesting when called in 
as a last minute fill-in for a comedian. 

2:30 P.M. First flu ndred Years • 2 

Daytime serial pivoting about the life of newly- 
weds played by Olive Stacey and Jimmy Lydon. 

3:00 P.M. Miss Susan • 4 

Pleasant, radiant Susan Peters enacting the day- 
to-day problems of a successful woman lawyer. 

3:30 P.M. Remember This Bate • 4 (T & Th) 
Bill Stern, once stage manager at Radio City 
Theatre, with an audience participation quiz. 

4:00 P.M. Strawhat Matinee • 4 

Until Kate Smith returns, Mel Martin is your 
host to a full-hour variety show from Cincinnati. 

5:00 P.M. Sherift Bob Bixon • 2 

There's drama for the youngsters plus demon- 
strations of handicrafts and woodlore. 

5:00 P.M. Hawkins Falls, Pop. 6200 • 4 

Well-paced, well-written daytime serial of the 
pressures and personalities of small town life. 

S:00 P.M. Maru ilartline Show • 7 

Pretty Mary's games, songs and stories for the 
small fry with Chet Roble at the piano. 

5.-30 P.M. Hoivdy Boodu • 4 

The moppets' puppet hero with Bob Smith. 

7:00 P.M. Ernie in Kovacslund • 4 

For uninhibited wackiness, Ernie Kovacs is tops. 

7:00 P.M. Captain Video • 5 

Video's ace science fiction series with Al Hodges, 
Sunday school teacher in private life. 

7:45 P.M. TVs Top Tunes • 2 (M, W & F) 

Blonde warbler Peggy Lee and throaty Mel Torme 
with the Fontane Sisters and occasional guests. 

7:45 P.M. News Caravan • 4 

John Cameron Swayze, a news expert now, ad- 
mits his real ambition was to go on the stage. 




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0:00 P.M. Pantomime Quiz • 2 

Mike Stokey, emcee, pits two teams of movie ac- 
tors against each other in acting and identifying 
sayings, situations and songs sent in by viewers. 

0:00 P.M. Cameo Theatre • 4 

Theater-in-the-round with Albert McCleery di- 
recting special effects. 

0:00 P.M. Present Perspective • 7 

A two-hour period planned to give you back- 
ground on current issues. 

0:30 P.M. Godfrey's Talent Scouts • 2 

Humorist Herb Shriner subs during August. 

8:30 P.M. Voice ol Firestone • 4 

Howard Barlow, an excellent baritone, himself, 
conducts chorus and orchestra for top artists. 

0:00 P.M. Lights Out • 4 

Tremble with fear as the sinister tales unfold. 

0:00 P.M. Wrestling with Bennis James • 5 
Two hours on the mat with "Okay Mother" 
James in grunt-and-groan sessions. 

0:30 P.M. It's News to Me • 2 

Panel Quiz with John Daly as moderator. 

9:30 P.M. Somerset Maugham Theatre • 4 
For the summer only, weekly half-hour dramas 
adapted from the pen of the famous author. 
10:00 P.M. Summer Theatre • 2 

Comedies, mysteries and light dramas make up 
the summer series with Betty Furness as hostess. 
1 1 :00 P.M. Chronoscope • 2 

Subtitled, "The Truth of the Matter," with back- 
ground facts on headline topics. 



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7:30 P.M. Beulah • 7 

Ethel Waters continues as Beulah until early fall 
when Hattie McDaniels takes over the witty, 
cheerful role of housekeeper in the Henderson 
home. Others : Butterfly McQueen, William Post, 
Jr. 

0:00 P.M. Meet the Press * I 

The same moderator and same format as the 
Sunday show but featuring different name-in-the- 
news guests and a fresh panel of crack news- 
papermen. 

0:00 P.M. Court of Current Issues • 5 

The prize-winning opinion program with thirty 
minutes of incisive cross-examination of authori- 
tative exponents of vital issues. Irving Sulds, 
producer, creates a typical courtroom scene. 

9:30 P.M. Juvenile Jury • 4 

A panel of five children discuss questions con- 
cerning parents' minor difficulties with their off- 
spring. Originator Jack Barry moderates. 

8:30 P.M. John Hopkins Science Review • 5 

The absorbing, exciting "show-how" of science 
mixes new subjects with reruns from last winter's 
program. Aug. 14, "Which Came First"; Aug. 
21, "Fireflies and Metabolism"; Aug. 28, "Don't 
Take Your Heart for Granted"; Sept. 4, "Mag- 
nificent Microscope." 

9:00 P.M. Fireside Theatre • 4 

A special series of live shows for the summer 
with original scripts and adaptations from fa- 
mous short stories. Albert McCleery directs. 

9:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Bands • 5 

Buddy Rogers, who plays eight different instru- 
ments himself, emcees the weekly showcase of 
big name bands plus top-flight variety acts. 

9:00 P.M. Q.E.D. • 7 

The provocative, amusing program with mystery 
questions posed by viewers. Fred Uttal moder- 
ates. Panel: radio producer Hi Brown, actress 
Nina Foch, musician-magician Richard Himber. 

9:30 P.M. Suspense • 2 

Now in. the midst of its new experiment with 
producer-director Robert Stevens presenting 
documentary material in the usual tense format. 

9:30 P.M. life Begins at Eighty • 7 

Old but young in heart and then some as emcee 
Jack Barry discovered when a guest, 86, demon- 
strated a "pivot punch" and Jack's eyes popped. 
Panelists: Georgiana Carhart, 85, John Dranuy, 
90, and Fred Stein, 82. 

10:00 P.M. Danger • 2 

Tight dramas of people in jeopardy, produced by 
Charles W. Russell, movie-radio actor and hus- 
band of Hollywood actress Nancy Guild. 

10:00 P.M. Original Amateur Hour • 4 

This famous program continues to entertain as 
well as inspire countless amateurs. Ted Mack 
notes that over 500 "original amateurs" have at- 
tained professional success in show business. 

11:00 P.M. Broadway Open House • 4 

Elephantine funny-man Jack E. Leonard ad-lib- 
bing with statuesque Dagmar, dancer Ray Ma- 

M lone, pert songstress Eileen Barton, vocalist 

Buddy Greco and the music of Kirby Stone's 
Quintet. 

76 




7:30 P.M. Chance of a Lifetime • 7 

Jovial John Reed King, aided and abetted by 
blonde beauty Cindy Cameron, poses puzzlers to 
contestants that pay off in handsome, valuable 
prizes plus chance at "Mystery Voice" jackpot. 



0:00 P.M. Godfrey and His Friends • 2 

Arthur is fishing but not "his family." The show 
goes on with Marion Marlowe, Janette Davis, 
Frank Parker and Haleloke, backed up by the 
Chordettes, Mariners and Archie Bleyer's or- 
chestra. 







0:00 P.M. Strike It Rich • 2 

This popular daytime show can now be seen 
evening televiewers as well. Warren Hull con 
tinues to emcee the program as the audience 
decides which of the contestants seems most 
worthy of financial assistance. 

9:00 P.M. Kraft Theatre • 4 

Masterly produced and cast with excellent actors. 
"KTT" obtains its scripts from Broadway and 
Hollywood success plus novels and original 
stories. 



9:30 P.M. The Web • 2 

One of the best of TV's who-dun-its with top 
yarns by the Mystery Writers of America. Frank 
lin Heller, producer, is a model railroader 






9:30 P.M. Shadow of the Cloak • 5 

Debonair actor Helmut Dantine cast as Cloak 
and Dagger agent in suspenseful tales of intrigue. 

9:30 P.M. Wrestling from Bainbo Arena • 

Feature cards with 60-minute time limit, plus tag 
games and shorter matches. Announcer Wayne 
Griffin loves the action, color and comedy ever 
though a grappler once landed on his head. 

10:00 P.M. International Playhouse • 5 

Dramatic imports from over the seas starring 
British actors and films noteworthy for their 
excellence. 



10:00 P.M. International Boxing Club • 2 

During the summer, films of the best boxing 
bouts of the past year. Dennis James comments, 
aided by boxers and professional sportsmen 






10:00 P.M. Breuk the Bank • 4 

Contestants get ten questions worth ten to 500 
dollars with a chance at the big cash bank that 
sometimes has been as high as $9,000. Emcee 
Bert Parks on the eve of one of his first broad- 
casts broke the bank himself with a set of boy 
twins. Bud Collyer is host with music by Peter 
Van Steeden's orchestra. 



10:30 P.M. Stars Over Hollywood • 4 

From the golden coast, screen actors in stories 
of comedy and light romance. On film. 



10:45 P.M. The Sports Snot • 2 

Jim McKay, star of "The Real McKay," is em- 
cee of this show devoted to all sports. McKay 
has done considerable play-by-play coverage in 
radio. 



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7:30 P.M. The Lone Ranger • 7 

Silver bullets and a silver horse carry the Masked 
Rider through exciting Western adventure. 

0:00 P.M. Burns and Allen • 2 

Because the dollar is worth only fifty cents, 
Gracie believes we can lower the cost of living 
by raising the cost of money. Husband George 
Burns understands, maybe. But such are the 
problems on this show with Bill Goodwin, and 
John Brown and Bea Benadaret. Biweekly: Aug. 
16 & 30. Alternating with — 

Starlight Theatre 
Hollywood stars in top romantic dramas. Bi- 
weekly: Aug. 23 & Sept. 6. 

; 
8:00 P.M. It Pags to be ignorant • 4 

The eight-year-old parody of panel-quiz shows 
with Tom Howard as the patient, frustrated quiz- 
master, baffled by George Shelton, Harry Mc- 
Naughton and gravel-voiced Lulu McConnell. 

8:00 P.M. The Morgan Show • 5 

Not Henry but Al, popular Chicago pianist, and 
his boys, whipping up lots of pleasant music. 

8:00 P.M. Stop the Music • 7 

Bert Parks takes a summer breather while ver- 
satile funnyman Phil Silvers emcees the money- 
musical game. In the show: piquant Betty Ann 
Grove, lovely Marion Morgan, Jimmy Blaine. 

8:30 P.M. Amos 9 n? Andg • 2 

The 25-year-old radio classic now filmed in 
Hollywood for TV. Amos played by Alvin Chil- 
dress; Andy by Spencer Williams, University of 
Minn, graduate, screen writer and veteran actor. 

8:30 P.M. Treasurg Men in Action • 4 

Forceful, tense dramas culled from the files of 

the U. S. Treasury Department. Walter Greaza, 

. highly-praised actor, scores as T-Men's Chief. 

9:00 P.M. Your Esso Reporter • 2 

Balanced news pictorial coverage with top CBS 
reporters. Winston Burdet from New York; 
Howard K. Smith, London; David Schoenbrun, 
Paris; Ned Calmer, Rome; Robert Pierpoint, 
Tokyo and others. 

9:30 P.M. Big Town • 2 

Action-paced series of a newspaper man who al- 
ways gets his story. Pat McVey, as Steve Wilson. 

10:00 P.M. Racket Squad • 2 

Film series drawn from real life stories of rack- 
ets, emphasizing that the public's pocketbook 
is in greater danger from swindlers than theft. 
Reed Hadley stars as Captain Braddock. 

10:00 P.M. Freddg Martin Show • 4 

Musical variety for the whole family with the 
"singing saxophone man" himself as emcee and 
spotlighting pianist Murray Arnold and singer 
Merv Griffin. 

1 0:30 P.M. Quick on the Braw • 4 

Exuberant, quick-witted Eloise McElhone is 
mistress of ceremonies in this cartoon-charade 
series. A guest panel puzzles over questions. 

11:00 P.M. Broadwag Open House • 4 

See Tuesday, 11 :00 P.M., for review. 



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7:30 P.M. Sag It with Acting • 7 

The very amusing variation of charades featuring 
Bud Collyer and winsome Maggi McNellis as 
emcees. Guest teams from B'way plays compete. 

8:00 P.M. Quiz Kids • 4 

Joe Kelly, chief quizzer, has the time of his life 
and you will, too. as the youngsters are con- 
fronted with ingenious visual questions. Panel- 
ists: Joel Kupperman, 14. Melvin Miles. 7, 
Naomi Cook, 12, Harvey Dytch, 7, Ann Wil- 
helm, 12. 

8:00 P.M. Twentg Questions • 5 

TV version of the long-time favorite radio game. 
Bill Slater as emcee and starring Fred Van De- 
venter, Florence Rinard, Herb Polesie. John 
McFee. 

8:00 P.M. Jerrg Colonna Shoiv • 7 

The side and ear-splitting comedian wiggles his 
mustache and pops his eyes in hysterical skits. 
In the glamour department. Barbara Ruick; the 
clamor department, Paul Sells. 

8:30 P.M. Man Against Crime • 2 

While Mike Barnett (Ralph Bellamy) takes a 
vacation from this crime series, brother P*t Bar- 
nett fills in. Pat is played by Robert Preston. 

8:30 P.M. The Clock • 4 

We, the People takes a hiatus and tempus 
fugit. This show is concerned more with serious 
drama than "chillers" but the clock continues as 
narrator controlling the action. 

0:00 P.M. Film Firsts • 2 

Feature films made in Hollvwood shown for the 
first time on TV. Aug. 10, "The Man Who Lost 
Himself," starring Brian Aherne and Kay Fran- 
cis; Aug. 17, "Room to Let"; Aug. 24. "Turn- 
about," starring Carole Landis. Jo^n Hubbard 
and Adolphe Menjou; Aug. 31. "Old-Fashioned 
Girl"; Sept. 7, "Let's Live Again." 

0:00 P.M. Boor with \o Name • 4 

Movie actor Grant Richards plays Doug Carter, 
hand-picked operative for the nation's most haz- 
ardous assignments. 

0:00 P.M. Hands of Besting • 5 

Original stories of violence, cast with Broadway 
actors and directed by Dick Sandwick. 

0:00 P.M. Pulitzer Prize Plaghouse • 7 

Excellent casts, memorable stories and fine pro- 
duction make this one of the top TV shows. 

9:30 P.M. Front Page Betective • 5 

Stage and screen star Edmund Lowe as flippant 
columnist-detective in hard-hitting stories. 

J 0:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Sports • 4 

For the summer only, a filmed sports newsreel 
of the week's highlights. 

10:00 P.M. Cavalcade of Stars • 5 

It's gleeful time with Gleason, comedian-emcee, 
in a lively variety show featuring the June Taylor 
Dancers, Sammy Spear's orchestra and guests. 

10:30 P.M. Emotion • 2 

English made film series with thirty-minute plots 
depicting the basic human emotions of love, fear 
and hate against unusual, weird backgrounds. 

10:45 P.M. Great Fights of the Centurg • 4 

Famous fights of the ring, recorded on film : Aug. ' 
17. John Son vs. Stanley Ketchell; Aug. 24. Joe 
Louis vs. Natie Mann; Aug. 31 & Sept. 7. TBA. _ 







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Ml:30 A.M. Date with Judy • 7 

A light, pleasant family comedy with attractive 
Pat Crowley as boy-crazy Judy. Anna Lees plays 
her mother; Judson Rees as her father. 
12:00 Noon Big Top • 2 

Spectacular circus acts with unicyclists, big cats, 
bands, acrobats and aerialists. 
12:30 P.M. Faith Baldwin Theater • 7 

Stage and screen luminaries in dramatizations 
from the vast library of Faith Baldwin. Biweekly : 
Aug. 11 & 25, Sept. 8. Alternating with — 

I Cover Times Square 
Broadway newshound Johnny Warren, played by 
Harold Huber, ferrets out yarns of what he calls 
"the biggest aquarium in the world on land." 

2:00 P. M. Lara in e Day Show • 7 

Laraine is elegant hostess to a variety of enter- 
tainment and interviews. Musical background 
provided by the Bill Harrington Trio. 

4:00 P.M. Mr. Wizard • 4 

The "magic" of general science makes for ex- 
citement as well as education for youngsters. Don 
Herbert as "Mr. Wizard" and Bruce Lindgren. 

5:00 P.M. Italian Feature Film • 9 

Some of the best films come from Italy and all of 
these have English titles: Aug. 11, "Four Steps 
in the Clouds"; Aug. 18, "Queen of the Opera"; 
Aug. 25, "Hey Day for Marriage"; Sept. 1, "The 
Merry Chase"; Sept. 8, "Captain Tempest." 

6:00 P.M. Space Patrol • 7 

The thrills of chase, in space, replete with rocket 
ships, space-o-phones and beautiful heroines. 

7:00 P.M. So Yon Want to Lead a Band • 2 

The swing and sway maestro, Sammy Kaye, con- 
structs a bright musical show with studio con- 
testants competing as amateur bandleaders. 

7:30 P.M. Beat the Clock • 2 

Prizes worth $100 and up for contestants who can 
perform tricky parlor stunts. Bud Collyer, em- 
cee, aided by Roxanne, Conover model. 

7:30 P.M. Stu Erwin Show • 7 

The laugh-provoking problems of a high school 
principal (Stu) and his wife (June Collyer) and 
daughters (Sheila James and Ann Todd). 

8:00 P.M. Summer Film Theatre • 2 

Full-length motion pictures filmed in England, 
many J. Arthur Rank productions. 

8:00 P.M. Saturday Bound Up • 4 

An action-packed, stirring series of typically 
Western film sagas starring Kermit Maynard. 

8:00 P.M. TV Teen Club • 7 

For the young in heart of all ages, Paul White- 
man's full-hour talent hunt among the younger 
generation. Young Nancy Lewis as his co-emcee. 

9:00 P.M. Wonderful Town • 2 

Glamour-guide Faye Emerson in a superb show. 
A different city is saluted each week. 

9:00 P.M. Midwest Uayride • 4 

The long successful hillbilly and variety show 
from Cincinnati. 

9:00 P.M. They Stand Accused • 5 

Courtroom drama from Chicago. Fictional cases 
of broad human interest with professional actors 

9:30 P.M. The Show Goes On • 2 

Q. Lewis, whose Christian name is Robert, col 
lects totem poles and ancient records, but herein 
presents fresh entertainers for talent buyers 
10:00 P.M. Songs tor Sale • 2 

Comic Steve Allen, an established songwriter him 
self, introduces embryonic songwriters and their 
unpublished work. Music by Ray Bloch's band 
10.-00 P.M. Doodles Weaver Show • 4 

Zany comedy show with Marion Colby and star 
ring Sheffield Winstead Weaver. 
10:30 P.M. Assignment: Manhunt • 4 

Andre Baruch is host to adventure-mystery series 



Sondoy 



4:00 P.M. Meet the Press • 4 

A newsmaking press conference as reporters fire 
questions for thirty unrehearsed, uncensored min- 
utes at people in the news. Martha Rountree and 
American Mercury's Lawrence Spivak moderate. 

5:00 P.M. Gubby Hayes Show • 4 

That ole bearded polecat, Gabby, with dramati- 
zations of heroic stories from American history as 
well as some tall stories about his fabulous family. 

5:00 P.M. Super Circus • 7 

Super entertainment for everyone thrilled by the 
gaping jaws of lions and leopards, trapeze artists 
and other sensations of the big ring. Claude 
Kirchner, ringmaster; Mary Hartline, band- 
leader; Sliffy, Scampy and Nicky, clowns. 

0:00 P.M. Hopalong Cassidy • 4 

Tried and true Westerns with rustlers, guns and 
horses starring Bill Boyd, who has so many 
awards, one whole office room is reserved for them. 

0:00 P.M. Ted Mack Family Hour • 7 

A compact vaudeville show of versatile talent 
with authoritative Ted as your genial host. 
P.M. Gene Autry • 2 

Adventure on the range with the cowboy star, 
whose first recording, "Silver-Haired Daddy," 
made in 1930, has now sold 5,000,000 copies. 
P.M. Leave It to the Girls • 4 
Something new has been added. Now charming 
Maggi McNellis allows men to enter complaints 
about the girls and so mayhem continues. Panel- 
ists: guest and regulars, with one hardy male. 
P.M. Summertime Beview • 7 
Pops Whiteman relaxes from the heat as bari- 
tone Earl Wrightson takes over as emcee; guest 
stars and songstress Maureen Cannon. 
P.M. Go Lucky • 2 

If you enjoyed playing "Coffee Pot," you'll like 
this brand-new quiz as celebrities go through 
antics for the benefit of studio contestants. 
P.M. Toast of the Town • 2 
As TOT celebrates its fourth year on TV with 
outstanding variety, Emcee Ed Sullivan credits 
the show with breaking his stoneface into a smile. 
P.M. American Inventory • 4 
$87,500 has been donated by the Sloan Founda- 
tion to create this network program employing 
experimental techniques in adult education. 
Social and economic problems are discussed. 
P.M. Becital Hall • 4 

Outstanding musical artists presented just as they 
would be seen and heard by a concert audience. 



7:00 



7:00 



7:00 



7:30 



0:00 



8:00 



8:30 

9:00 P.M. G. E. Guest House • 2 



Pianist-humorist Oscar Levant opens the door to 
theatrical celebrities with a variety of entertain 
ment plus Oscar's fine piano interpretations. 
9:00 PM. Philco Playhouse • 4 

Excellent drama adapted from best-sellers under 
the exacting direction of Gordon Duff. 
9:00 P.M. Boeky King, Detective • 5 

Scientific police detection solves heinous murders 
on this show, starring well-known movie comic 
Roscoe Karns as the genial Inspector. 
8:30 P.M. The Plainclothesman • 5 

Using camera technique that makes you the de- 
tective, crime puzzlers are unscrambled with Ken 
Lynch in title role; Jack Orrison as Sgt. Brady. 

10:00 P.M. Celebrity Time • 2 

Conrad Nagel is your host to the game and fun 
session as celebrities team up with football coach 
Herman Hickman and Mary McCarty. 

10:00 P.M. American Forum of the Air • 4 

Theodore Granik with provocative current topics 

10:30 PJM. What's My Line? • 2 

The guess-your-occupation show stays on for th 
hot months as panelists stagger their vacations 
Moderator, John Daly; experts: Arlene Francis 
Dorothy Kilgallen, Louis Untermeyer, Hal Block 






s 



ummer 



Fun A 



nswers 



SIXTY-FOUR DOLLAR QUESTIONS 



FAMOUS ANIMALS: FACT AND 
FICTION 

1. The Old Gray Mare 

2. Pluto 

3. Because Androcles had removed a 
thorn from its foot many years before. 

4. He had wings (Mythological: the 
steed of the Muses) 

5. Elizabeth Barrett Browning 

6. The Elephant's Child 

7. Lion 



EATING AND DRINKING 

I'll tell you what I'm eating and 
drinking — you tell me where I am. 

1. Russia 

2. France 

3. England 

4. China 

5. Hungary 

6. Germany 

7. Boston 



STRIKE IT RICH ANSWERS 

1. Earthquake 

2. Piccolo 

3. The Gold Coast 

4. Ted Lewis 

5. Easter Island 

6. The words 

7. A police regulation stating that fires 
or lights are to be out and people to 
be off the streets at a set time. 

TWENTY QUESTIONS 
ANSWER 

Edison's first phonograph 



BREAK THE BANK ANSWERS 






1. Tallulah Bankhead 

2. Ed Sullivan 

3. Dagmar 

4. Ronald and Bonita Colman 

5. Fred Allen 

6. Treasury Men in Action 

7. Frances Langford and Lew Parker 

8. Dizzy Dean 

9. Estes Kefauver 



10. Lilli Palmer 

11. Faye Emerson 

12. Win Elliot 

13. Len Doyle 

14. Perry Como 

15. Groucho Marx 

16. Florence Rinard 

17. Serge Koussevitzky 

18. Lowell Thomas 






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Long Memory 

Dear Editor: 

Will you please tell me what part Jane 
Morgan takes in Our Miss Brooks? Also, 
did she play in New Haven in a stock 
company? It was a good many years ago, 
but I think it is the same woman. I always 
enjoyed her acting very much. 

Miss J. R., New Haven, Conn. 

Jane Morgan has the hilarious role of 
the landlady in Our Miss Brooks. As for the 
New Haven stock company — you may pos- 
sibly be right, since the English-born 
actress has toured throughout the United 
States in road companies with such well- 
known stars as Charlotte Greenwood and 
Barbara Stanwyck. 

Space Man 

Dear Editor: 

Would you please give me some informa- 
tion about Frankie Thomas who plays Tom 
Corbett on one of my favorite television 
shows, Space Cadet? Is he married and 
how old is he? 

Miss A. W., Dayton, Ohio 

Frankie Thomas is in his mid-twenties 
and he is as yet unmarried. He lives on a 
farm in New Jersey with his parents, Frank 
and Mona Thomas, both of whom are still 
quite active in radio work. Frankie, a fa- 
mous child star in movies and radio and on 
the legitimate stage, can also be seen in the 
television film revival of "Tim Tyler's 
Luck." 



Connt Carleton 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to see a picture of the actor 
who plays the role of The Count of Monte 
Cristo. Where was he born, and is he mar- 
ried? 

Mrs. K. B., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Here's Carleton Young — every bit as 
dashing as his radio role of Monte Cristo 
would lead you to believe. Carleton was 
born in Westfield, New York. He had little 
intention of becoming an actor, but when 
the principal of his high school — who was 
also a minister with great love for the thea- 
tre — saw him act in the senior class play, 
he urged the boy to take up acting. After 
graduating from Carnegie Tech's Dramatic 
Institute, Carleton was in several Broadway 
plays and had the Ellery Queen role on 
radio. He and his wife, Barbara, have two 
boys and a girl, age fourteen, ten and nine. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y. We'll answer if we 
can either in Information Booth or by mail 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter along with a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope, and specify whether your ques- 
tion concerns radio or TV. 




Carleton Young Jane Morgan Frankie Thomas 



ROBERT THE "Q" 



(Continued from page 46) show on which 
you play the newest platters as well as rare 
old ones? I'm referring to your "Steven Got 
Even" and "If I Give Up the Saxophone." 
Jack C., Atlanta, Ga. 

Dear Jack: 

I play them whenever I can sneak them 
away from the stamp collectors. Why 
stamp collectors? They buy my records, 
then stamp on them. 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

What do you do with all that money you 
make on The Show Goes On and on Rob- 
ert Q's Waxworks and as a Godfrey re- 
placement on his morning show? You must 
be getting rich. 

Donald B., Cleveland, O. 

Dear Don: 

After sending in my taxes, I was able last 
week to make a down payment on two 
steaks. 

Dear Bob: 

I'm a young girl eighteen and a half 
years old and have just won a beauty 
contest in my home town. I have blonde 
hair, big blue eyes, am 5'6" tall, and I am 
told that I strongly resemble Lana Turner. 
How can I break into television in New 
York? 

M. O., New York City 

Dear Miss Oh! 
Please call my office immediately. 



Dear Mr. Lewis: 

I'm a young girl eighteen and a half 
years old, very serious and studious but not 
at all good-looking. How can I break into 
television? 

Jennie M., New York City 

Dear Miss M. 

Get yourself an agent. 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

What is the favorite show that you have 
ever helped to create on either radio or 
television? 

Elmer J. Jr., Louisville, Ky. 

Dear Elmer: 

The Show Goes On — and I mean this 
seriously, because of the wonderful op- 
portunities it affords young professionals. 
This gives all of us connected with the 
show a great personal satisfaction, and is 
a subject too close to my heart ever to 
joke about. 

Dear Bob: 

Outside of appearing on the Arthur God- 
frey shows, what was your favorite replace- 
ment stint? 

Harold Q. H. 

(mine's for Quentin) 

Dear Harold: 

The time that I replaced Faye Emerson 
on her show and wore the lowest cut suit 
I could find. 



Dear Mr. Lewis: 

I understand that you are a bachelor. 
Doesn't any woman want you? 

J. L. S., Fargo, N. D. 

Dear J. L. S. 

Yes, there's a lady sheriff in Montana 
and I think she's the only woman who is 
looking for me at the present time. 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

Are you handy around the house? For 
instance, are you able to make your own 
bed? 

Jennie L. S., Peoria, III. 

Dear Jennie: 

Not having the right kind of lumber 
handy I haven't attempted this yet. 

Dear Mr. Lewis: 

Perhaps you can answer this question: 
Wasn't Herbert Hoover our last Republican 
President? 

R. T., Newark, N. J. 

Dear R. T.: 

It certainly begins to look that way. 

Dear Robert Q.: 

It's a pleasure to have you in my living- 
room each week. 

M. A. G., Chicago, III. 

Dear M. A. G.: 

I don't recall being there and had better 
see my doctor. I may have amnesia. 

Now let's let this whole subject rest 
right there! 



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DAGMAR'S MY SISTER 



(Continued from page 42) Bobby Joe fif- 
teen, Theresa Marie thirteen, and our baby, 
Danny, is nine. Our little five-foot mother, 
an ex-schoolteacher, was actually chris- 
tened Spicie — which we think is the cutest 
possible name for her. Our six-foot-two 
dad, Ray, is an engineer. 

When Sis tells people she is just being 
herself on television, it's true in a way, 
because she always had such spontaneous 
wit and gaiety, always came out with un- 
expected comments that forever kept us 
laughing. One Christmas when she didn't 
come home we could hardly stand it, be- 
cause when she was there she made our 
holidays so jolly. Playing little jokes on us. 
Fixing things up pretty. Spending her last 
cent for wonderful presents, like the 
Christmas when she bought three bicycles 
at one time for the younger children. 



Sis is definitely the sentimental type 
anyhow, the kind who cries regu- 
larly at important occasions like christen- 
ings, graduations and weddings. It's typical 
of her that tears ran down her cheeks when 
Judge Frank McNamee was making her 
Mrs. Danny Dayton last May 21. Danny 
says that when he turned to put the ring 
on her finger and saw her face he wanted 
to tell the judge to stop making Sis cry, he 
felt so bad. Nobody had a chance to warn 
Danny that Sis might weep, because when 
Sis flew out west to marry him at Las 
Vegas, in the Chapel of the Flamingo 
Hotel, no One knew their plans. I knew 
they'd been dating since they were in a 
play together two years before, and I could 
see they were crazy about each other, so I 
wasn't really so surprised. 

Sis was married in a high-necked gray 
lace dress, and they say she made a beau- 
tiful bride. She and Danny did try to keep 
the wedding a secret for a while but it 
got out. In fact, when they went into the 
supper room at the hotel for their dinner, 
Mickey Rooney was performing there and 
he recognized my sister, yelled "Dagmar!" 
and promptly stood on his head in greet- 
ing, which certainly tickled Sis. 

How she got to be Dagmar dates back to 
June 14, 1950, when the telephone rang 
one night at 9:30 and she was asked if she 
could come on Broadway Open House at 
11:00. That night Sis began creating the 
girl called Dagmar — and the male and 
mail response was so terrific that she's been 
Dagmar ever since. All of Dagmar's cutest 
mannerisms are really natural to Sis. She 
holds her head straight and high, and she 
tosses her hair when she is amused or 
amusing, just as Dagmar does. And she 
gets that same little note of surprise in her 
voice if she comes out with something 
funny without intending it, and we start to 
laugh at her. 

Sis herself .laughs a lot at Dagmar. 
There was a picture of her in a Dagmar 
pose in a recent magazine and Sis took 
one glance at the typical Dagmar expres- 
sion she'd put on for the photographer, 
she laughed out loud and said, "Look at 
that face. She looks like she never had a 
brain and never will have one!" 

When Sis first came to New York six 
years ago to visit our Aunt Theresa she 
got a job as a model. Then she heard about 



an audition for the Olsen and Johnson 
stage show, "Laughing Room Only." She 
had never been in a show before. "I just 
thought I should do it," she says. Chic 
Johnson asked what experience she had, 
and "I didn't think there was any use 
starting out just dancing and such stuff 
when I knew I could act, so I just told Mr. 
Johnson I didn't want to go into all that 
talk and foolishness about what I had done 
before and he should let me read for him 
and then if he liked me, fine, and he could 
tell for himself that I had plenty of ex- 
perience for the part." She got the job 
and individual billing right from the start. 
The night before the show opened she con- 
fessed that she had no previous experience 
and Mr. Johnson thought it was the funni- 
est thing he had ever heard. It's unusual 
for Sis to lie, I must say, because she is 
known for her frankness and directness — 
but it sure worked out fine that time. 

It has never been hard for Sis to tackle 
anything new, even when we were kids. 
One of our funniest stories about Sis was 
the time a big company had a bicycle rid- 
ing contest in our town. The other girls 
talked her into competing, although she 
had never owned a bicycle and had never 
tried any trick riding. She just got on and 
watched the others and when they stood 
up and took their hands off the handlebars 
and did stunts she did them too and some- 
how or other she managed to keep her 
balance and win a bicycle! 

Sis was always winning cups for dancing, 
although she never had a lesson. Some- 
times when we were still in our teens I 
would wake up late at night and find her 
tap dancing until I thought the house 
would come down. Dad got so proud of her 
talent that he made her perform for every- 
one who came to the house. She had leads 
in school plays, too, and was always pop- 
ular with boys — but Sis was never what 
you'd call "boy crazy." 

When she was in Junior High, Sis shot 
up, but actually she is only five foot eight 
now, and high heels add the extra three 
inches. Her natural hair is more red-gold 
than blonde, but this color is better for 
television. She has lovely blue eyes and 
looks very much like Dad and brother 
Jackie. My mother is dark. 

Sis has a very small waist — only twenty- 
four inches — and a thirty-nine bust. I don't 
know her weight because she never gets 
on a scale, "so I can truthfully say that 
I don't know what I weigh," she says, and 



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MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS, INC. 
205 E. 42nd Street New York 17, N. V. 



1 



I 



means it. She was never self-conscious 
about her figure or her height and she 
never cared if a man was shorter than she. 
When someone asked her if Danny was as 
tall as she is she answered that he was 
slightly taller but it wouldn't have mat- 
tered either way. and in her best Dagmar 
manner she added, "I just like someone 
who is sweet and very intelligent and likes 
the higher things of life." She was acting 
Dagmarish but she really feels that way. 

We didn't expect Sis to be a performer. 
After high school she went to business 
school to learn shorthand and typing. Her 
first job was as cashier in a loan company 
office, and she felt so sorry for the people 
who borrowed money and couldn't pay it 
back that she had to quit. 

Sis has always been the busiest some- 
body in the world, never sitting still except 
when she has something interesting to read 
or is looking at television. She hates to 
write letters, so she telephones or tele- 
graphs instead — and her bills are enorm- 
ous. She's a grand cook, the kind who 
makes the plainest foods look and taste 
like a dream. One Saturday night not long 
ago she baked a meat loaf and to surprise 
me she put my name on it with strips of 
cheese, and it was so pretty I didn't want 

Io eat it. 
She likes to shop but doesn't have much 
ime for it any more. I can buy her most 
verything. even shoes, but she has her 
own ideas about dresses, especially eve- 
ning gowns. She always looks for a long 
torso line and not much trimming. On her 
programs she has had to wear some she 
didn't like, because in the beginning her 
salary was small and gowns were lent to 



her by famous designers — beautiful things, 
but not always her type. Now she is de- 
signing some of them herself and getting 
the kind she knows are becoming to her. 
Jewelry doesn't interest her too much, ex- 
cept for the choker pearls she wears so 
much, the watch Danny gave her last 
Valentine's Day, and her wedding ring 
made up of a row of baguettes with a row 
of smaller diamonds on either side. 

Her one big extravagance is a clean 
powder puff every day. Not the inexpensive 
kind that is made to be used once and 
thrown away, but the real good big soft 
ones. I keep one hidden away for emer- 
gencies and the last time we ran out of 
them I said, "Don't worry. I've got a puff 
for you." "No, you haven't," Sis told me. 
"I found it the other day and used it." 
Now I hide them in all sorts of odd places. 

Danny says that her outstanding char- 
acteristic is her love for people, and I 
guess he's right. She's just naturally socia- 
ble and she loves to talk. I can't get any- 
thing done when she's around because if 
no one else is there she keeps running in to 
tell me things she has just thought of and 
wants me to know about, like people she 
has met, conversations they had, plans 
she wants to make, observations about 
everything. She is very careful of people's 
feelings and will go miles out of her way 
to keep from offending someone. 

I know about the fan mail because last 
November I left my job as receptionist and 
secretary with the bus company in Hunt- 
ington to help Sis with her mail and act 
as her assistant when she needs one. The 
mail was getting enormous and there were 
so many demands on her time for benefits 



and special things, like being crowned 
Queen of Armed Forces Day, and Miss 
Welder of 1951, and performances for 
fund-raising drives for sick children and 
wounded veterans. I guess her biggest kick 
was having a tank christened Dagmar. 

Sis has moved to a penthouse opposite 
Central Park, with a forty by twenty-four 
foot living room where she and Danny can 
entertain their friends when he isn't in 
Hollywood making pictures. 

Sis is still decorating the new apartment. 
The living room is in pale gray and white, 
with a fireplace flanked by tall, carved 
walnut built-in bookcases and antique mir- 
rors. Two gold covered sofas face in front 
of the fireplace and lamps and chairs pro- 
vide pleasant spots of color. There will be 
lovely drapes as soon as Sis has time to 
select them, and as she says, "With those 
tall bookcases we'll have to have a book 
party when we get all furnished, because 
to fill that many shelves we'U need plenty 
of Dagmar's En-cy-clo-pee dee-i-ays and 
Shakes-pee-ree sets." Sis's bedroom is go- 
ing to be feminine" and frilly, the way she 
likes it. 

A reporter asked "her recently if, now 
that she's married, she intends to stay in 
TV. "You may say," Sis answered in her 
best Dagmar manner, "that I am still 
interested in my lit'rary work and in edu- 
cating the people." 

I don't know about the educating, but I 
do know she loves to make them laugh and 
forget their troubles — just as she often 
made us forget ours in the house in Hunt- 
ington where the nine Egnors never 
dreamed that one of them would turn out 
to be Dagmar! 




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I'M A HICKORY WIDOW 






(Continued from page 57) with my own 
years of experience in show business, I can 
appreciate the strain of Al's work. For 
years I traveled with Paul Whiteman as 
solo pianist and then on my own, playing 
theaters and night clubs. But I don't be- 
lieve I ever went through a period of "one- 
nighters" for seven months at a time as Al 
does. You know, Mutual doesn't cover just 
one ball club, but all the teams in both 
leagues. Al may have breakfast at home, 
hop a plane for Boston to do the play-by- 
play, and be in Chicago for a late dinner. 



We'll settle down and live like 
real people," I told Al when we 
got married. And we honestly tried for a 
while. We first met before the war, when 
we were both working at Mutual. I had my 
own musical program. Al and Red Barber 
were doing baseball. We couldn't help 
noticing Al. He's a brawny six-foot-three 
with the kind of face that a young artist 
told me she would like to chisel on the 
side of a mountain. 

In 1943 Al and I began seeing each 
other with the sudden realization that we 
were in love. We talked about getting 
married. Al was in the Naval Reserve, on 
active duty at Miami. I went to the Olym- 
pia Theatre in Miami for a two-week en- 
gagement, found that Al could get away 
occasionally to see me, and stayed — play- 
ing the Bali Club — for two months. 

We were talking about the wedding 
then, only postponing it until he got a 
leave. I bought a complete wedding en- 
semble, safely stored it in my mother's 
home and began an extended theatre tour. 
I was in Boston when Al phoned. 

"I'm calling from Solomon's Island." 

I nearly fainted away. Although it 
would have been impossible to phone 
from the Solomon Islands in the Pacific, 
naturally it was what I thought of. "It's 
in Maryland," he added quickly and went 
on to invite me to a wedding the next day 
in Baltimore. Our wedding. 

I was nearly in tears when I got to 
Baltimore the next morning, for I didn't 
have time to pick up all of those special 
clothes. In fact, I remember changing 
dresses in the railroad station for the 
ceremony. But married we were on June 
14, Flag Day. Al was a Commander in 
the Navy and so handsome in his white 
uniform he took my breath away. Neither 
of us, however, looked groomed for long. 
As usual on parade days, it rained, and 
we were caught in the storm. When we 
got to a train, to begin our honeymoon 
and continue my theatre tour, the train 
was jammed. You know what travel was 
like during the war — anyone was lucky 
to find room to stand in the aisle. And 
that's exactly what we did. 

"This is no way to begin a honeymoon," 
Al said. "I'll be back in a few minutes." 

He was gone ten and when he came 
back, we had a drawing room all to our- 
selves. And so Al spent his two-week leave 
with me. 

Al gets cross when anyone mentions his 
war experiences in print. He doesn't be- 
lieve in trading on such things in his 
business. But as his wife, I have some 
prerogatives and one of. them is rightful 



pride in my husband. You could well 
call him a hero, although not to his face, 
for he saw quite a bit of action command- 
ing PC's, destroyer-escorts, etc. He took 
part in many engagements and was com 
manding officer of an anti-submarine 
squadron that spearheaded and fired the 
first shot of the Allied invasion of Sicily. 
It was in the invasion at Palermo that his 
back was injured when German dive- 
bombers nearly blew up his ship. As a 
matter of fact, the whole incident was 
dramatized on Cavalcade of America, Al- 
fred Drake starring as Al Heifer. 

But that seems far away now. Al's life 
as an announcer is safer but nonetheless 
hectic. We tried to settle down for a while, 
but Mutual wanted Al to come back, went 
about it rather cleverly. In November of 
1947, he began a network news commen- 
tary. Usually, Al is lively and gentle and 
great fun. But sometimes he just locks 
himself up. That's when I know he has 
a problem. Finally, he told me about it, 
"Mutual wants me to cover baseball and 
that means a lot of traveling." 

Well, the poor dear loves baseball. Per- 
haps not so much as he loves his wife 
and child, but sports run a close second. 
So, knowing all these things, I encouraged 
Al to broadcast baseball again. 

Our home in Hartsdale is quite beauti- 
ful. It's on a hill, topping a natural rock 
formation. The style of the house is 
English, made of brown wood and stucco. 
We have six giant oak trees, enormous 
rhododendrons and a beautiful lawn. As 
a matter of fact, our neighbors, a lawyer 
on one side and a chemist on the other, 
help with the gardening during the sum- 
mer. Al pays them back in the fall and 
winter, for he's quite handy with carpen- 
ter's tools and loves to putter. 

Our only child, six-year-old Ramona — 
we call her "Mona" so the two of us won't 
get confused — agrees with her mother that 
the sun sets and rises on Al. Every morn- 
ing when she gets up she asks, "Will 
Daddy be home today?" Of course, from 
March through September, she usually 
gets a negative answer. But when Al does 
have one of those rare evenings at home 
Mona refuses to wear her blue jeans or 
play dresses. She primps up and dons 
only the best for Daddy. 



Al is crazy about her and makes 
those infrequent hours at home 
count. He plays Old Maid with her or 
teaches her acrobatics. Mona likes to play 
piano for Daddy. She couldn't help learn- 
ing around me, although I don't believe in 
formal lessons for a child of her age. 

Mona has learned a lot about baseball, 
just as I have. In the days when Al cov- 
ered only Giant games, (Now with Al an- 
nouncing all games, we show no partisan- 
ship.) I got to know the players and their 
wives. Sid Gordon, Willard Marshall, 
Buddy Kerr and Sheldon Jones were all 
sweet guys. Johnny Mize and his wife 
Jean were particularly good friends. Once 
Johnny talked Al into his uniform before 
a regular game and it was rather amusing. 

"You used to play ball," Johnny coaxed. 
"Why don't you get out there." 

That was in 1949, and in the pre-game 






warmup Al came out on the field wearing 
Johnny's uniform while Johnny hid in 
the dugout. The players knew what was 
up, but Manager Leo Durocher didn't. 
Al was taking pegs, sweeping up the ball 
and whipping it back but it wasn't long 
before he began to slow up. "You're get- 
ting as slow as an old woman, Mize," Du- 
rocher called, or words to that effect. 

When Al turned grinning, I think Du- 
rocher was a bit relieved. So was Al. The 
last game he played was an exhibition 
in 1939 when he pitched with the Dodgers. 
He got one of his prize souvenirs that day. 
Because Al is such a big man, he couldn't 
find a Dodger uniform that fit. Babe 
Ruth, who was on the field, gave Al one 
of his old Yankee uniforms. That, of 
course, hangs with Al's other souvenirs 
which include a ball cap from every team 
in both leageus. 



Al is now on the air seven days a 
week and this season has taken off 
only one day. That happened when Mona 
had her tonsils out. 

We had telephone calls all day long 
from all over the country. One woman 
called from the mid-west, said she was 
seventy-eight, and asked to be called 
"Grandma." I don't get jealous of "Al's 
gals," as the men on production call them. 
I don't blame them for getting excited. 
Of course, they treat Al as one of the 
family and write, "We wait for you so 
we can just sit back to talk baseball." 

And then they are always sending gifts, 
usually the most luscious foods. When 
we got a twenty -two pound- smoked ham 
from Kentucky, it was just too much for 
the family. Al invited all of the men who 
work the broadcast to come up to the 
house after a New York ball game. He 
announced this over the air. Before the 
game was over he had a telegram from 
Utah. "Crate of strawberries now enroute 
by air for your ham dinner." 

Al's a good friend, a man who likes 
people. When he has evenings free, neigh- 
bors come over for conversation and music. 

But I am solely housewife and mot.ier, 
I keep away from network studios and 
agents who might inveigle me into a "few" 
engagements. My hands are full running 
the house, raising our daughter and keep- 
ing Al's accounts. My next-door neighbor, 
Ruth Muller, mother of a six-month-old 
baby, is a concert violinist who has ap- 
peared many times on TV. We get to- 
gether for frequent musical evenings. I 
do a lot of reading, too, and enjoy televi- 
sion. But my life really begins again the 
moment Al returns home, no matter how 
tired he is, which reminds me of the most 
difficult job I have. That is getting Al 
awake in the morning. When he gets 
home after midnight and must be up at 
six in the morning to take off again, you 
can readily understand how exhausted 
he is. I coax and finally get him walking. 
I make sure he has enough shirts and 
underwear in his bag, for a man his size 
can't always find clothes that fit. 

I drive him to LaGuardia Field and we 
talk about Mona, baseball, something to 
fix in the house, or just about us. And 
when he turns at the cabin door of the 
plane to wave goodbye, I get goose bumps 
all over. The plane takes off . . . And I'm 
a baseball widow again. 




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AUNT J EX XV How far can a wife go 
in trying to help her husband? In Aunt 
Jenny's story about the Bakers, Laura is 
faced with the problem of knowing she can 
help Jim get the job he needs if she will 
go to her ex-boy friend, Phil Porter, and 
ask for it. Pocketing her pride, she finally 
does talk to Phil, and Jim gets the job. 
But Phil can't keep from rubbing it in, and 
the Baker marriage is almost wrecked 
until Phil's sister steps in. 

M-F, 12:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BACKSTAGE WIFE Despite the efforts 
of Rupert Barlow to undermine their mar- 
riage, Mary and Larry Noble are happier 
than ever as Larry begins work in the 
revival of the play in which he first starred 
last year on Broadway. Still determined 
to part the Nobles, Rupert brings to New 
York charming Dora Dean, the young 
movie actress, who had fallen in love with 
Larry while he was working in Hollywood. 
M-F, 4 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

BIG SISTER Ruth and Dr. John Wayne 
have been through many emotional ups 
and downs in the course of their married 
life, but never one more shattering than 
that caused by the interference of Millard 
Parker. Has Parker actually managed to 
convince John that he has valid reason 
to be jealous of Reed Bannister? Reed 
made no secret of once having loved Ruth 
Wayne . . . has he changed, or is Parker 
right? 

M-F, 1 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

BBIGUTER DAY Because she and her 
father cannot agree on her responsibility 
to her baby, Althea Dennis is drifting 
farther away from family attachments. 
Reverend Dennis is pained by this, but 
refuses to allow Elizabeth to go on sacri- 
ficing herself for her selfish sister. Is he 
justified in hoping that some good will 
come to Liz from her California trip? 
Will she renew her contact with Manny 
Scott — and Nathan Eldredge? 

M-F, 2:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 





FRONT PAGE FARRELL "The Full 
Moon Murder Case" involves reporter 
David Farrell and his wife Sally in the 
slaying of a famous song-writer, who is 
stabbed to death near a wooded section 
of his country estate. The case becomes 
complicated when it is learned that a 
lunatic, escaped from a nearby asylum. 
was at large at the time of the crime. 
What leads does David uncover to help 
the police capture the murderer? 

M-F, 5:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

GUIDING EIGHT Too late, Bertha 
Bauer awakens to the realization that she 
herself may have driven Bill into the 
arms of another woman. Has he left Ber- 
tha for good, or will she get him back, 
as she vows to do? Meta also is having 
emotional problems with the hostile chil- 
dren of reporter Joe Roberts. And Trudy, 
planning a Mexican trip, does not know 
that it will be all the more exciting be- 
cause of a man named Clyde Palmer. 
M-F, 1:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

HIEETOP HOUSE Julie Paterno finds 
a wry kind of humor in reflecting on the 
astonishingly bad taste of Dr. Jeff Brown- 
ing as far as choosing wives is concerned. 
His first brief marriage was a disastrous 
experience, and now, when he was on 
the verge of marrying Julie, her scheming 
cousin Nina swept him into a whirlwind 
elopement. How long will it be before 
Nina shows him at last what her true 
colors are? 

M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

JI7ST PEAtN BMLE Bill Davidson and 
his daughter Nancy are trying to help 
Bill's old friend, Stanley Warner, through 
a crisis in his life. In a tragic accident, 
Stanley ran over and killed his son. Nancy 
is especially sympathetic because her first 
child was killed in similar circumstances. 
But Stanley's wife, Bessie, hysterically, re- 
fuses to believe it was an accident, and 
has accused her husband of murder. 
M-F, 5 P.M. EDT, NBC. 






KINGS ROW Red-headed, beautiful 
Randy McHugh finds herself helpless in 
the emotional tangle of an impossible 
love when she and Dr. Parris Mitchell 
acknowledge their feeling for one another. 
For Parris has an invalid wife from whom 
his conscience will never permit him to 
free himself. What happiness can there 
be for these two? Will they have to re- 
nounce one another — or is there another 



way? 



M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



LIFE CAN BE BEAUTIFUL Learning 
that Colonel Bell has plotted against him, 
Barry has a furious quarrel with the 
Colonel which is made doubly significant 
when shortly afterwards the Colonel is 
poisoned. He might have killed himself, 
but the police think Barry did it, and 
when Chichi learns of Barry's trouble 
she astounds Papa David and herself by 
leaving her wheel chair to walk to the 
phone to talk to him. 

M-F, 3 P.M. EDT, NBC 

MA PERKINS Though Fay manages to 
conceal the extent of her disappointment, 
the Perkins family and their friends have 
no doubt that she is much upset when a 
business commitment forces Spencer Gray- 
son to postpone their wedding. However, 
Ma insists that young Tom Wells come to 
her house to convalesce after his accident, 
so Fay and Ma have plenty to do. Is Fay 
almost too interested in Tom's successful 
recovery? 

M-F, 1:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

OUR GAL SUNDAYLawyei Alison Gray 
obtains a confession in which Lord Henry 
Brinthrope confesses to the murder of 
Keith Carlyle. Sunday, knowing her hus- 
band is innocent, works desperately to 
vindicate him before Alison has a chance 
to proceed with her plan to present the 
confession to the authorities. But in her 
efforts to save Henry, Sunday naturally 
comes close to the real murderer, thus 
exposing herself to terrible danger. 
M-F, 12:45 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY Because 
Sadie Mercer was so kind to Mr. Young 
while he was imprisoned by the two 
hoodlums recently, the whole Young fam- 
ily tries to help when Sadie marries Eddie 
Barker. Mr. Young gets Eddie a watch- 
man's job at the bank and the young 
couple seem set for a happy life in Elm- 
dale when suddenly Gil, Sadie's old boy 
friend, appears and begins to threaten her. 
Will her past trap Sadie? 

M-F, 3:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

PERRY MASON Lawyer Perry Mason 
tangles with one of the most dangerous 
adversaries of his career when Anna B. 
Hurley fights him over the strange affair 
of May Grant and her daughter. Nobody 
except those intimately involved was ever 
supposed to learn the truth about the 
little girl. But when Perry discovers the 
link between May Grant and glamorous 
star, Kitty Di Carlo, he knows he holds 
the key to Anna's downfall. 

M-F, 2:15 P.M. EDT, CBS. 




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Daytime 
diary 



KlfillT TO HAPPINESS When Caro- 
lyn became the wife of Governor Miles 
Nelson^ she was too mature to believe 
that only happiness lay ahead, but she was 
not entirely prepared for the sinister 
forces that were already conspiring to 
affect not only their marriage, but Miles' 
career. Annette Thorpe, powerful and 
wealthy, has not resigned herself to losing 
Miles to Carolyn. In what subtle way 
will she try to get what she wants? 
M-F, 3:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. ' 

ROAD OF LIFE Dr. Jim Brent, his 
friend Frank Dana, and others in Merri- 
mac who are concerned stand aghast as 
the truth about the Overton family begins 
slowly to emerge from concealment. Jim, 
as a doctor, and Frank as an editor, are 
instrumental in exposing the activities of 
the Overtons, but how will this affect 
Jim's relationship with Jocelyn McLeod, 
the lovely niece of the Overtons, who in- 
terests Jim so much? 

M-F, 3:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT Be- 
lieving that Gil is finally lost to her after 
his marriage to Cynthia Swanson, Helen 
Trent continues with her career as an 
important Hollywood gown designer, un- 
certain what place wealthy Barclay Bailey 
may come to have in her life. Columnist 
Daisy Parker, Helen's enemy, convinces 
Barclay's mother that Helen is indeed the 
fortune hunter Mrs. Bailey believes her 
to be. Will Barclay listen to his mother? 
M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

ROSEMARY Bill Roberts, on the point 
of straightening out his marriage to Rose- 
mary, is stunned when Blanche Weatherby 
dies of a bullet wound after accusing 
him of shooting her. In spite of the story 
told by Rosemary's friend Blondie, which 
refutes Blanche's story, the police take Bill 
into custody. Rosemary immediately 
leaves Springdale to be with Bill in New 
York, hoping she can help in some way to 
prove his innocence. 

M-F, 11:45 A.M. EDT, CBS. 

THE SECOND MRS. RURTON Never 
before, in the course of her happy life 
with Stan, has Terry Burton faced quite 
the problem that beautiful Amy West- 
lake poses. Stan's new partner at the Bur- 
ton Store is not only a lovely woman but 
a very shrewd one. To Stan, she appears 
merely intelligent, but Terry cannot help 
suspecting that Amy's mental activity is 
directed toward success with Stan rather 
than with the store. 

M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, CBS. 



STELLA DALLAS Stella's distrust of 
Ben Jasper is well founded, for he is part 
of the gang of jewel thieves headed by 
Keith and Virginia Manton. Keith plans 
to "retire" after the gang's current job 
is concluded, but Ben Jasper has become 
more ambitious. He is determined to marry 
Laurel's friend Hollis Page, who will in- 
herit a fortune when her grandmother dies. 
Though she doesn't know Ben's plans, 
Stella suspects the worst. 

M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

THIS IS NORA DRAKE Peg Martin- 
son has very nearly achieved her goal of 
ruining Nora's life. Armed with proofs 
which she herself does not know to be 
faked, Peg has used her influence as a 
trustee of Page Memorial Hospital to 
force Dr. Jensen to ask Nora and Dr. 
Robert Sergeant to resign. Nora and Dr. 
Sergeant are unable to protect themselves 
against the charge of financial juggling. 
Will this trouble ruin their romance? 
M-F, 2:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

WEN BY WARREN Though Mark 
Douglas' adventure in Europe is now be- 
hind him, his continuing nightmares and 
incomplete flashes of remembrance indi- 
cate to his friends that he has not re- 
covered from the rigors of his captivity. 
Anton, on behalf of the Intelligence De- 
partment, asks Wendy to try to help Mark 
remember, for he may be suppressing vital 
information. Will this hold up Wendy's 
marriage to Mark? 

M-F, 12 Noon EDT, CBS. 

WOMAN EN MY HOUSE James Car- 
ter finds renewed faith in the solidity and 
loyalty of his family life when he learns 
that the mysterious business which occu- 
pied his son, Jeff, was far from discredit- 
able. When Jeff finally takes his father 
and mother into his confidence, James is 
so relieved and happy that his relations 
with his other children, strained by his 
fear that they were drifting away, become 
happy once more. 

M-F, 4:45 P.M. EDT, NBC. 

YOUNG DR. M ALONE Anne Malone, 
uncertain of the feelings or desires of her 
estranged husband, Jerry, postpones so- 
lution of her own problem with regard 
to Sam Williams, whom she planned to 
marry after divorcing Jerry. Does this 
mean that Sam's son, Gene, will renew 
his hopeless efforts to persuade Anne that 
she is in love with him, a boy ten years 
her junior? What will happen to Gene's 
ill-starred marriage to Crystal? 

M-F, 1:30 P.M. EDT, CBS. 

YOUNG WIDDER RROWN Victoria 
Loring, sister of Dr. Anthony Loring, has 
been Ellen Brown's enemy ever since 
Anthony and EUen first fell in love. When 
Ellen now learns that Victoria herself is in 
difficulties which may end in the disrup- 
tion of her own marriage plans with for- 
tune-hunting Cornelius Drake, she tries to 
help the completely unhappy Victoria. But 
her efforts only manage to increase Vic- 
toria's enmity. 

M-F. 4:30 P.M. EDT, NBC. 



REMEMBER THIS 
DATE 

(Continued from page 27) sail to an unex- 
plored land, where they could worship as 
free men. 

There were villains aplenty on their 
ship. Not only was the Captain a rough 
pirate in the pay of Brewster's enemies, 
but renegades had been planted among 
his followers to usurp his leadership. The 
boat itself was primitive, with leaky decks 
and cracked beams. On board this ship 
went decent, God-fearing men with their 
children and wives. Some died, many 
were violently ill. After two months on 
the ocean, the Captain landed them — not 
in a warm climate where they would have 
a chance to survive winter, but in the cold 
November of the north. Before Brewster 
and his friends went ashore, they drew up 
a paper that made them the first demo- 
cratic body to reach the new world. They 
signed the famous "Compact" by which 
the first "civill body politick" was organ- 
ized with "government by consent of the 
governed." 

Perhaps you've guessed that I'm talking 
about the Pilgrims who landed at Plym- 
outh Rock. Sure, we remember the court- 
ship of Priscilla Mullins by John Alden 
and Captain Myles Standish — but how 
about the bravery of the Warrens and 
Whites and Cookes and Fletchers and all 
of the women and children? We remem- 
ber them on Thanksgiving, celebrating 
their first harvest — but that came later, 
much later. The act of supreme courage 
came when they left Holland, in spite of 
unknown dangers, savagery, starvation and 
death to win the dignity of free man and 
his right to think and worship as he 
pleased. So I say, remember this date of 
momentous undertaking, September 6, 
1620. 



PEPPER YOUNG 



(Continued from page 39) 
Meanwhile Mrs. Trent's' plans to break 
up Carter's marriage gathered momentum. 
She hired a thug, Gil, to uncover a "past" 
in either Pepper's or Mr. and Mrs. Young's 
lives. When this failed, she instructed Gil 
to frame a scandal in whatever way he 
thought most effective. This turned out 
only too well — Sam was charged with 
robbing the bank and killing the night 
watchman. Since the night watchman, on 
his deathbed, had said Sam was the last 
person he had seen, the case seemed air- 
tight. However, Sam obtained permission 
from the sheriff to pick up a lead in Chi- 
cago and try to clear his name. In Chicago 
he located Sadie Mercer, Gil's girl friend. 
Sadie finally broke down and gave him the 
names of the thugs — which he, in turn, re- 
layed to the police. But before the police 
could find Gil and his gang, the gangsters 
kidnapped Sam and, it was assumed, killed 
him. This latest violence was more than 
Mrs. Trent could stand. She confessed her 
role to Carter. But before she could tell 
the sheriff, the police located Sam un- 
harmed and he returned to Elmwood a 
free man. 



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WHEN HAZEL stopped off at the Bar- 
bours' on her way home, she 
found everybody there busily talking 
about Margaret. She had been calling, it 
seemed, all afternoon, trying to locate 
her mother. 

"It sounded like something dreadfully 
important, Hazel dear," Fanny Barbour 
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steaming cup of tea with an affectionate 
smile. "Margaret isn't in any kind 



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90 



of trouble, I hope. Is she, Hazel?" 
"Margaret doesn't even get into trou- 
ble," Hazel said gloomily. "She doesn't 
get into anything. She's in an awful 
stage — I don't know what to do with 
her. Why, just last night at dinner, after 
Dan had kidded her about asking for 
two helpings of chocolate cake, she 
looked at him and wailed, 'What differ- 
ence does it make how fat I get? I never 
get a date anyway.' And then she pushed 










'hat does 
matter how fat 
I get," wailed 
Margaret pushing 
her plate away, "I'll 
never gel a date!" 



her plate away, muttered about being the only girl 
who hasn't had a date this term, and dashed out." 
Cliff, who was spending one of his rare after- 
noons at home, grinned. "I think she's going to be 
a good-looking gal when she gets started. She was 
crying on my shoulder all afternoon, before she 
went home, about how none of the kids at school 
ever date her. I don't (Continued on page 92) 

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MARGARET'S "BARBOUR BOOK" 






(Continued from page 91) think she's that 
much worse-looking than most of the girls 
her age, from what I've seen." 

"Well, thank you," Hazel said sarcasti- 
cally. "There's nothing wrong with Mar- 
garet's looks. She just isn't as forward as 
some of the others. That Geraldine friend 
of hers — purple lipstick an inch thick. I 
don't know what the child's mother can be 
thinking of to let her go around like that. 
And the clothes. . ." Hazel shuddered. 

Fanny said comfortably, "Margaret al- 
ways looks neat and tidy to me. And she 
has a very pretty complexion. But she 
does look as though she isn't having too 
good a time, dear. Couldn't you do some- 
thing about it?" 

"What?" Hazel challenged. And Fanny 
had to admit she didn't really know. "Any- 
way," Hazel went on, "it's just this boy- 
crazy phase she's going through. You 
know how Margaret has always been — she 
gets these periodic enthusiasms and throws 
herself into them with such feverish 
abandon that nobody can live under the 
same roof with her. Then it runs its course, 
and there's a dull period, and all of a sud- 
den bang — as Hank and Pinkie used to 
say — she's off to the races again. I think 
this business about dates is pretty much 
the same thing. It will follow the same 
course, I tell myself. But in the mean- 
time, well — you've seen her. The great 
Queen of Tragedy. Nobody has ever, ever 
suffered as Margaret Murray is suffer- 
ing now." 

Cliff reached for another piece of mar- 
ble cake. "I don't think you've got it right, 
Sis. After all, Margaret's fourteen. I'd 
be inclined to say that as far as she's con- 
cerned, this business about boys and dates 
is here to stay." 

"Maybe," Hazel said. "But somehow 
I don't think so." She frowned, remem- 
bering the complete childishness of Mar- 
garet's pout. She had looked about ten. . . 
"I know it will come sooner or later. But 
I don't think this is it. She's not ready, it 
seems to me. If only she'd get over this 
Rodney Dwyer business — " 

"That's it!" Fanny said happily. "That's 
what I couldn't remember. She said to 
tell you, Hazel, if we saw you or spoke 
to you, that it was about Rodney Dwyer 
and would you please hurry home at once." 



"Please, please, hurry, as I remember 
it," Cliff grinned. 

Hazel put a hand to her forehead with a 
groan. "Oh, no. Not Rodney Dwyer. 
can't stand it. Probably she went into the 
Soda Bar and he was there, and she's been 
having hot-and-cold fits ever since. Moth- 
er," she pleaded, "couldn't I just stay here 
for dinner and not go home at all? I can't 
face any more of Rodney Dwyer — and as 
for Dan, he may just leave home." 

But of course she went, almost at once. 
Prepared for some trivial incident involv- 
ing the worshiped Rodney, and prepared, 
too, to give it the quiet, enduring atten- 
tion she felt a mother should offer, Hazel 
was surprised to find a Margaret she 
hardly recognized waiting impatiently on 
the porch. She laid eager hands on Hazel 
and drew her inside. "Where have you 
been? I'm on pins and needles. Wait till 
I tell you — " Blazing with radiance, she 
danced around impatiently while Hazel 
went upstairs to change. "Listen, will 
you? I've got a date with him! For the 
big dance!" 

Hazel stopped stock still on the stairs. 
Her impulse was to say, "I don't believe 
it." But it must be true if Margaret said 
it. And the child was transformed. In 
fact she was so radiant she looked posi- 
tively feverish. She ran upstairs and into 
Hazel's room, pulled a housecoat out of 
the closet and tossed it on the bed. Then 
she got down and began pulling off Hazel's 
shoes. She had so much energy, all of a 
sudden, that she apparently didn't know 
what to do with it. 

"Just listen, will you, sit there and I'll 
tell you all about it," she chattered. "Don't 
do a thing but listen and tell me what you 
think I was just sitting there on the 
porch, see, and the phone rang! And it 
was Jerry — Geraldine Connor, you know." 
Margaret sat back on her heels, savoring 
again the glory of that moment. "She 
said — Mother, she said that Rodney 
Dwyer had agreed to take me to the dance 
next week." 

Hazel was immediately annoyed. "What 
do you mean, he had agreed?" 

"Well, he had asked Jerry — everybody 
asks her, you know how simply desirable 
she is — but she already told Frank Per- 
kins she'd go with him. Only Rodney's 




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a pretty important guy around school — 
basketball and track and all that — so 
Jerry was in a quarry." 

I wish she were. Hazel thought, but 
automatically she said, "In a quandary, 
dear."' 

"Yes, well. So Jerry — she thinks awful 
fast, you know— she said would he take 
me, and if he did, we'd .all be together 
anyway. We'd be double-dating, see; and 
we'd be the same party. And Rodney. . ." 
Margaret's eyes took on the calf-like glow 
that made Hazel want to kick her. "He 
said. . . he would." 



Well, thought Hazel, of all the 
out-and-out calculating nerve, that 
girl Geraldine really has it. Then she 
looked more closely at Margaret. There 
was no question in her daughter's happi- 
ness. As far as she was concerned, a pearl 
of enormous price had been laid in her lap 
with no strings attached. Beyond the blaz- 
ing fact that she would be going to the 
dance with the great Rodney, she saw no 
shadows — no maneuvering on the part of 
that calculating little minx who called her- 
self a friend; no reluctance on the part of 
Rodney, no condescension. . . Hazel smiled 
inwardly, remembering her conversation 
with Cliff. "That's one for me," she 
thought. "Margaret is still a child. She's 
not really ready, not really involved emo- 
tionally with this dating business. If she 
were, she'd be crying her eyes out because 
Rodney Dwyer had to be worked into a 
date with her, and that the only reason he 
agreed was to be with Geraldine Connor." 

Hazel put a loving hand on her daugh- 
ter's shoulder. "I think it's tremendous." 
she said loyally. "It's terribly, terribly 
exciting. Let's go down and get dinner, 
and tell Dan, shall we?" 

Dan, surely the most affectionate and 
devoted stepfather in the world, was suit- 
ably delighted at the news. He talked 
ibout Rodney of his own free will all 
through dinner, asking questions about the 
boy's scholastic and athletic achievements 
quite as though the next step were to 
inquire about his intentions. Margaret 
was so delighted by his interest that she 
gave him an extra kiss before she asked 
to be excused and left Dan and Hazel to 
their second cups of coffee. She ran up- 
stairs, and they heard her rummaging 
around in drawers and closet. Then there 
was a brief period of silence, and she 
came slowly down the stairs again and 
stood in the doorway. One hand was raised 
to clutch the door-frame; the other lin- 
gered at her throat in a gesture that was 
pure Bette Davis. Head thrown back, 
mouth tense with emotion, she said stark- 
ly, "Mother. I can't possibly go. / 
haven't a thing to wear." 

There was a slight explosion as Dan 
gulped over his coffee. He put the cup 
down and looked soberly at Hazel, but his 
eyes were gleaming with suppressed 
laughter. "Happy day," he said. "Today 
we are a woman." 

"Not quite," Hazel said softly. "Not 
quite." To Margaret, she said. "Don't 
worry, dear. We'll go out Monday or 
Tuesday and get you something pretty. 
White organdie, perhaps." 

"A real formal? Oh, mother, a real 
evening thing, with no shoulders and a 
floof — " Words failing her. Margaret 



week," Margaret 
kitchen doorway 
fingernails. She 
at her mother. 



made gestures around her bosom. "Oh. 
I'm so ecstatic I could scream," she cried, 
and flew up the stairs again. 

Hazel frowned, not quite knowing why 
she was suddenly nervous. "She oughtn't 
to be too happy. She ought to take it a 
bit easier. Anything might happen. . ." 
She didn't say aloud what she was think- 
ing, that with a girl like Geraldine Con- 
nor involved, something was bound to 
happen. 

It happened on Monday, and it turned 
out to be about Clifford's new car. Cliff 
Barbour always had the most noticeable 
car in town, but his new one, a Bernadotte. 
was really stopping traffic. Everyone had 
noticed its gleaming cream-colored length 
and had commented on its extravagant red- 
leather upholstery. According to Mar- 
garet, it had created a sensation at school, 
and had earned her the only notice she'd 
had all term from the baseball team when 
Cliff had obligingly driven her down to the 
stadium to watch practice. Of course it 
wasn't Margaret they swarmed over to see, 
but the car . . . but still they had to at 
least say hello to her when she was sitting 
right there. 

"Rodney saw it last 
said, standing in the 
and worrying at her 
looked apprehensively 
"Mother. Do you think I could dare ask 
Uncle Cliff if — if we could borrow it?" 

"Borrow his new car?" 

"For the dance." Margaret shifted and 
twined her feet intricately around one 
another. Even her ankles looked worried, 
Hazel thought irrelevantly. When Mar- 
garet was happy she stood with her feet 
slightly apart, poised almost on tiptoe. . . 
"You see, Rodney asked Jerry to ask me 
to ask Cliff. . . ." Her voice trailed away 
and she gazed at her mother in despair. 
She didn't need to finish the sentence. 
Hazel blazed into anger again, but silently. 
Nerve! Had Rodney also said, "I won't 
take her unless she can get her uncle's 
car?" Hazel would have bet on it. That 
was the way it must have been, only crafty 
Geraldine was breaking it gradually, so it 
wouldn't look too much like a plot. She 
opened her lips to tell Margaret flatly that 
she wouldn't permit her to go at all, and 
then something in her daughter's wary, 
piteous expression kept her quiet. "Re- 
member," she told herself. "Don't start 
taking it seriously. If it's good enough for 
Margaret, going like this, why destroy her 
pleasure? It's not as if she were seven- 
teen and this represented a first-class social 
crisis. It's just a kids' dance. Don't make 
it important." 



Aloud, she said. "We'll see. dear. If 
Rodney's a good driver — " 

"Oh. he is! He's driven every other 
kind of car in this town. That's why he's 
so anxious — " 

"We'll see." Hazel repeated. Privately 
she determined that Cliff should lend the 
car. He'd been very nice to Margaret. 
driving her around quite as though he 
were a devoted swain. He would do it if 
she asked him to. 

A phone call later to Cliff got the de- 
sired results. Margaret, radiant again, 
relayed the news to Geraldine, and there 
was an animated review of the schedule 
for picking up the members of the party 













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on Saturday night who were going to have 
the dazzling honor of riding to the dance 
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garet! Hazel was briefly annoyed again. 
But Margaret was so happy — for the first 
time she was in the forefront of big things! 

Having reached equanimity again. Hazel 
vowed not to allow herself to become dis- 
turbed by anything else pertaining to the 
big occasion. She was braced for a long 
siege ol Rodney-talk; Rodney did this, 
Rodney said that, he stopped by my locker 
this afternoon, and so on. It was madden- 
ing, but after all very typical — as Fanny 
reminded her on the one occasion when 
she allowed herself a weary complaint. 
"Remember the Morkin boy?" Fanny 
asked gently, not looking up from her 
knitting. "The one you had such a crush 
on? You talked about him until your 
father made you put a nickel in the piggy- 
bank for every time you mentioned his 
name. You bought your first angora 
sweater with the proceeds, and by that 
time you wanted it to catch the eye of an- 
other little boy." 

"But I was older," Hazel, wailed. 



"/"I irls are older younger these 
VJT days," her mother said inexora- 
bly. And Hazel had to admit it was part of 
a mother's lot to bear her daughter's 
crushes. 

She withstood Rodney; but for the busi- 
ness about the dress she was not prepared. 
Margaret had seemed so elated at the idea 
of white organdie that the dress had taken 
almost concrete form in Hazel's mind be- 
fore they shopped for it. White and fragile, 
as a young girl's first dance dress should 
be; perhaps caught up here and there 
with a sprig of pink blossoms . . . charm- 
ing and delicate. She and Margaret talked 
about it Tuesday night, and Hazel, caught 
up in her planning, didn't notice that Mar- 
garet kept saying, "But Mother . . ." and 
then not finishing the sentence. After 
dinner, Margaret asked permission to go 
to her grandmother's. It was after that 
that the calls began. 

The first one was from Fanny herself, 
late Tuesday night after Margaret had 
come home and gone to bed. "Hazel?" 
Fanny asked. "Is Margaret asleep? 1 
don't think it's good for her to know 
people talk about her. . . it's about her 
frock, dear. Margaret mentioned you 
were thinking of white." 

Hazel uttered a non-committal sound. 
An unworthy suspicion invaded her. 

"Well," Fanny said, "it's up to you of 
course, but don't you think Margaret's a 
bit pale for white? A pretty lilac, now — 
or pink. 1 wouldn't go so far as to say 
an out-and-t>ut red — " 

"Who would?" Hazel interrupted 
quickly. 

Fanny coughed. "Please don't think 
Margaret's been trying to influence me, 
dear. It's just that I think she's right, 
you know — I think she's been talking it 
over with her little friends, dear, and they 
don't agree about white." 

Hazel gripped the phone. Her little 
friends, eh? That Geraldine 

Claudia phoned the next morning, after 
Margaret had gone to school. After a 
few preliminaries, she got around to the 
subject of the dance, and Hazel was in 



the middle of a sentence about how Mar- 
garet's excitement had reminded Fanny of 
her own girls, when suspicion seized her 
again. "Claudia," she interrupted herself 
to say. "Has that daughter of mine been 
at you too? She hasn't been talking about 
her gown, I suppose?" 

"Well," Claudia said. "Now that you 
mention it, Margaret did drop in for a 
few minutes. Just to chat. Look, Hazel, 
she may be right. Had you thought about 
something more — well, more vivid?" 

"As, for instance, red?" her sister asked 
grimly. 

Claudia was shocked. "Red! Darling. 
nobody wears red. No, I was thinking of 
a turquoise, say, or one of those in-between 
greens. . ." 

"We'll see, we'll see," Hazel said, and 
hung up abruptly. If I could get my hands 
round that little neck of Geraldine's, she 
thought, I'd— well. . . 

By the time Cliff called, she was no 
longer surprised. Margaret had been a 
very busy little girl indeed, it seemed. 
But that was her way. Once get her teeth 
into a project, and she held on until 
shaken loose. And really, Hazel thought 
with a certain reluctant admiration, she 
had planned her campaign like a general. 
Cliff's suggestion, made laughingly but 
apparently in accordance with a solemn 
promise extracted by Margaret, was that 
a nice bright blue would go very well with 
the red upholstery of his car. "You want 
the boys to see her," he pointed out. 
"That's been her trouble up to now — she's 
tall and she'll have a figure one day, just 
as one day she'll be a green-eyed blonde, 
but right now she isn't — well, she hasn't 
realized her potentialities." 

By two-thirty, when she could begin ex- 
pecting Margaret, Hazel had recovered 
enough from Margaret's campaign to re- 
member her sense of humor. She had 
even given the matter of the dress more 
thought, and was on the verge of deciding 
that they would try some brighter colors 
when Margaret, rather wary, came in. 
Nervously she examined her mother's ex- 
pression, and relaxed slightly when Hazel 
kissed her with a smile. 

"Milk and cookies on the kitchen table," 
Hazel told her. "Wash up and I'll get 
my hat. We'll have to scoot if we're going 
to get your dress." 



I 



'M* 



other, 1 — " Margaret said, 
shifting her weight. Hazel knew 
that gesture. She waited. "Jerry's here," 
Margaret said abruptly. She gestured. 
"Outside. On the porch. I wanted to let 
you know first." 

"How wise you were," Hazel said omi- 
nously. She had never made a secret of 
her dislike of Geraldine, though she had 
never interfered with the friendship. But 
if Margaret's next ace in the hole was 
Geraldine Connor, if Geraldine was going 
to add her mite to the anti-white-dress 
movement, there would indeed be some 
fireworks. Her eyes must have shown her 
mounting anger, for Margaret said hastily, 
"Please don't be angry. I thought — I only 
thought maybe Jerry could explain about 
how a white dress was simply the outside. 
I mean, nobody wears them. I — " 

"You were pleased enough with white 
the other night," Hazel pointed out. 

"I didn't know any better! I've never 



been to a dance," Margaret said miserably, 
got talking to Jerry and the others, and 
bey said white was strictly for kids. 
Lverybody'll be wearing tight slinky 
lings — maybe even black — " 

Hazel shuddered at the vision, but she 

lidn't comment. The problem right now 

vas Geraldine. One thing was certain — 

be wasn't going to sit calmly down and 

ike that little snip's insolent guidance 

buying the right dress for Margaret. 

largaret couldn't see it, fortunately, but 

le whole situation was really a humiliat- 

ig one for her, and Geraldine was wise 

lough to be perfectly aware of that. 

"Margaret, we haven't much time — if 

ve're going to get your dress at all today 

ye'll have to rush. Give Geraldine some 

lilk if you want, and tell her tactfully to 

away. We're too busy. And don't be 

upset and nervous, dear, it's only a 

dance. You'll be going to dozens of them. 

We'll get you whatever looks best on you; 

it needn't be white. Just hurry." 

"Oh, mother," Margaret squealed, per- 
fectly happy again. She hugged Hazel and 
ran out to the porch, there to dispose of 
Geraldine in some briefly efficient manner 
of her own. Hazel, going upstairs for her 
hat and purse, wondered just how she 
would do it. Forthrightly, no doubt. . . 
"My mother doesn't have time to talk to 
you, Jerry. She doesn't like you, you 
know, so I guess it's just as well if you 
don't talk to her. Anyway, I don't have 
to have white if I don't want it. . ." Yes, 
that would be Margaret's delicate way of 
handling it, most likely. She wouldn't see 
anything wrong with telling the truth. 

But Geraldine might. . . Geraldine al- 
most certainly would. Later, Hazel spared 
a moment to wonder if this snub which 
she had offered to the powerful Geraldine 
hadn't rebounded in some way to cause 
the final crisis. . . . 

It was, finally, a yellow dress. Trium- 
phantly they brought it home that evening, 
and after dinner treated Dan to a preview. 
He was enchanted. Pale daffodil-yellow, 
pike petals, folded about Margaret's thin- 
ness, which magically became slenderness. 
When you couldn't see how skinny her 
legs were, their length immediately be- 
came the asset they would one day be. 
And the color, with the small amount of 
make-up Hazel herself had applied, made 
Margaret into another girl. 

"Why, she is a green-eyed blonde," 
Hazel marveled. "Just as Cliff said. She 
looks lovely." She was conscious of a 



feeling of enormous relief. Somehow she 
hadn't hoped that even a perfect evening 
frock could make Margaret over into a 
smoothly pretty girl. " She'd seemed too 
young and awkward for anything so super- 
ficial as clothes to alter. . . 

Standing in the doorway, waiting almost 
in agony until she was sure they liked it, 
Margaret stared solemnly back at them. 
"Well?" she asked. "Well?" 

"Margaret, it's perfect!" Dan said. "You 
look like — well, you look glamorous. You 
look at least eighteen. It's wonderful, 
Hazel, really. She'll be a knockout." 

Margaret gasped. "Glamorous, me? Oh, 
Dan — really? You're not just — just — " 
She gulped, stared for a minute, and sud- 
denly burst into tears. Hazel's own heart 
gave a sudden leap. Poor kid! She was 
in a state over this dance. "Have I been 
wrong?" she thought anxiously, as she 
put her arm around Margaret and went 
upstairs with her. "Is she really all 
wound up in the thing? Because if she 
is, and if something happens. . ." 

But it was Thursday then, and what 
could happen between Thursday and Sat- 
urday? Hazel knew, secretly, that she 
had never for a moment been free from 
the nagging apprehension that something 
might happen, but — it hadn't happened 
yet, and there was so little time left. It 
must all go smoothly now. The car was 
assured. The dress was bought, and a 
great success. And Margaret — well, Mar- 
garet had practically detached herself 
from the real world and was floating 
somewhere above it, looking down pity- 
ingly upon ordinary workaday mortals. 
She, and nobody but she, was going to the 
year's big dance with Rodney Dwyer. Any- 
thing else that ever happened in her life, 
she told Hazel fervently, could be nothing 
but an anti-climax. 

The only thing that could happen was 
that Margaret might work herself into a 
real illness from pure excitement. On 
Friday, she came downstairs on her way 
to school with color so high that Hazel 
anxiously felt her forehead. Margaret im- 
patiently brushed the hand away. "I'm 
not feverish, Mother! I'm just excited, 
that's all. Didn't you used to be when 
you were young and going out formal?" 

HazeJ bristled slightly at the word 
'young,' but had to admit that mere ex- 
citement was enough to explain her daugh- 
ter's high color. "And you weren't even 
going with Rodney," Margaret pointed 
out, just this side of pity. 






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Hazel was quite sure, as she closed the 
front door on Margaret, that the pitch of 
expectation could go no higher. Margaret 
simply couldn't get more excited. The 
human frame was built to withstand only 
so much. . . there must be a tapering off. 

She hoped and almost prayed for it all 
day long, and in fact she was probably 
right. It might indeed have begun to 
taper off, just a little, enough for Margaret 
to get a good night's sleep. . . except 
that that night, after dinner, Rodney 
Dwyer came to call. 



Rodney Dwyer himself. He was just 
a thin, gangling boy to Hazel, but 
catching some of Margaret's absolutely 
dumbfounded astonishment, she found her- 
self almost fluttering as she invited him in. 
Margaret simply couldn't speak. Deathly 
pale, she stood like an agitated shadow 
in the hallway while Rodney awkwardly 
came in and shook hands with Dan. Then 
she murmured something indistinct and 
ran upstairs. It looked to Hazel as though 
she might be going to be sick to her 
stomach. She excused herself and followed, 
but Margaret was simply throwing cold 
water on her face and brushing her hair 
with feverish concentration. "Look like a 
scarecrow," she was muttering through 
clenched teeth. "Mother? Mother! Can 
you bear it? He's here! He came all by 
himself. Like a real date!" 

"You weren't expecting him, were you?" 
Hazel asked. 

"Expecting, him? Expecting Rodney? 
How would I ever expect him to come see 
me? All by himself?" Margaret stared at 
herself desperately. "I look like a crow. 
Mother, how do I look? I can't change 
my clothes, can I? It would be too ob- 
vious." 

"It certainly would," said Hazel, giving 
her a light spank on the bottom. "You 
look fine. Go on down and talk to him, 
that's all. And relax!" she hissed after 
Margaret down the stairs, but Margaret's 
rigid back continued to look as though it 
were on its way to an execution. 

Shortly afterward, Hazel herself went 
down again. Dan had managed to engage 
the redoubtable Rodney in basketball talk, 
but it was hard going. Taking a. hand, 
Hazel talked for a while about school in 
general, and then— some instinct coming to 
her aid — managed to work in the sugges- 
tion that there was no reason for Rodney 
and Margaret to confine themselves to the 
living-room. She had a peculiar, unshak- 
able conviction that there was a reason 
for Rodney's call, that he hadn't been 
drawn there by an irresistible desire to 
see Margaret. She was certain of it when 
he fell upon her suggestion with all but 
a shout of relief, and immediately dragged 
Margaret off for a walk. 

"Well," Dan said when they were gone. 
"Little Margaret is making progress, 
what? Seems like a nice enough boy." 

"Yes, I suppose he is," Hazel said ab- 
sently. She went to the window and ad- 
justed the blind, peering out meanwhile 
to see what was going on. But they were 
nowhere in sight. Unable to sit still, she 
fidgeted around the room until called to 
attention by Dan. 

"They've only been gone ten minutes, 
Hazel," he objected. "My word, if you're 
going to fidget every time Margaret goes 






out on a date, well, you'll never relax." 

"It's not a date," she said sharply. "Dan, 
I can't help it. I just don't feel right about 
the whole thing. That Geraldine. . ." 

"Geraldine? Who's Geraldine?" Dan 
asked. 

Hazel said, "Oh, well, it's all too silly." 
She made herself sit down then, and hold 
a book before her. But really, she knew, 
she wasn't reading. She was waiting, lis- 
tening, holding her breath „ . . 

And then it came. The patter of feet on 
the porch stairs, the slam of the front 
door, the quick ascent as Margaret by- 
passed the living room and fled up the 
stair. And the final, full-stop of her bed- 
room door swung violently shut. 

Hazel and Dan stared at one another. 
There was no mistaking the climactic qual- 
ity of Margaret's disappearance. Even 
Dan's suddenly watchful expression an- 
nounced that he knew something must 
have happened. 

After a long, long time, Hazel dared to 
go upstairs. Outside Margaret's room she 
paused, but there was no sound. When 
she knocked, a perfectly even voice told 
her to come in. Margaret was lying flat 
on her back on the bed, staring up at the 
ceiling. 

"Darling," Hazel said timidly. "What—" 

"Don't ask me what happened. Don't 
ask me — anything but that," Margaret said 
dangerously. "I'll tell you, but don't ask 
me, I can't bear it." 

Hazel waited. After a minute Margaret 
sat up and looked at her. Hazel felt a 
slight shock as she saw that after all the 
child hadn't been crying at all. She looked 
puzzled, yes, and maybe even as though 
she'd had an awful shock— but there were 
no tears. "You know what?" Margaret 
said. She gave her head a shake, as if to 
clear it. "I don't get it. You know what 
Rodney came over for? Well — it just hap- 
pens that Frank Perkins has the measles, 
that's all." 

Hazel frowned, puzzled. "Who's Frank 
Perkins?" 

"Frank Perkins was taking Jerry, 
Mother, don't you remember? That's how 
it all started anyway — because she said 
she'd go with him. Well anyhow, he came 
down with measles so what Rodney came 
over for was to tell me that naturally he 
couldn't take me to the dance now. He'll 
have to take Jerry." 



'WE 



ell,'' said Hazel. She found thai 
her hands were clenched, and 
made herself relax with an effort. It 
wouldn't do for her to get upset too; that 
wasn't the way to help Margaret. Every- 
body take it easy, she thought; that's the 
way : "That's pretty cool," she said. "That's 
one of the rottenest, meanest things I ever 
heard of." 

"Isn't it?" Margaret said, nodding. 
"That's what I thought. I mean, to say 
the least, it's awful bad manners. If you 
make an appointment you keep it — unless 
you get sick or something, or unless you 
remember you made another one first. 
But he didn't say that — he just said of 
course he'd have to take Jerry now that 
she had no one to go with." 

Geraldine, thought Hazel. If that wasn't 
a mother's instinct, I'll never have one. I 
knew that snip would find some way to 
work it all out the way she wanted it. . . 





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she just used Margaret all along. Just 
used her. 

"Naturally," Margaret said stonily, 
"I'm through with Jerry. After all if she 
has no better manners than that, well! 
But — " she sat up again. "Rodney. Think 
of it, mother. So — so — I mean, it was so 
belittling for him to come running over 
here just because Jerry sent him. Like a 
little dog, fetch and carry. . . You know 
something? I was so humiliated for him 
I couldn't even get angry! I just felt sort 
of pitying." 

"Good for you," Hazel said. "I was 
afraid you'd — well, I thought you might 
be crying or something — " 

Margaret jerked upright and turned 
rather wild eyes on her mother. "Cry — 
me? I wouldn't give them that satisfac- 
tion. Besides. . ." Her tone suddenly 
changed. She sounded oddly the way a 
cat might, looking at a saucer of cream. 
Her lips began to curl a little at the cor- 
ners. "Besides. There's Uncle Cliff's car. 
Rodney really cared about that, you know, 
Mother. He and another fellow are fight- 
for the record of who has driven the 
most foreign cars, and the other boy is 
two up on Rodney now. There's one thing." 
There was now no mistaking the satisfac- 
tion in her voice. "Rodney Dwyer will 
have to grow six arms and three heads 
before he ever so much as gets to touch 
the fender of Uncle Cliff's car. That's 
something, Mother, isn't it?" 



Yes, dear, it certainly is," Hazel 
said. She got up, feeling suddenly 
very inadequate. To go — to stay — which 
would be better? Studying Margaret's 
face, she got her cue. The smile had faded, 
and she thought she detected, at the neck 
of Margaret's sweater, a heightening pulse- 
beat and a certain amount of gulping. The 
tears were on their way, all right, in spite 
of Margaret's hardy words. Best to get out 
and let her cry them in peace. . . 

If Margaret did cry — and certainly she 
must have — she didn't do it for long. 
Looking in on her silent room some time 
later — at about ten-thirty — Hazel and Dan 
found her sound asleep, curled round her 
pillow, fully dressed. Her shoes had 
slipped off, and they put a light coverlet 
over her and turned out the light and 
left her that way. It had been an amazing 
performance, a heartening display of for- 
titude, Dan said. "We'll never let her 
know how much we pitied her," he vowed. 
"Honestly, Hazel, I know it's all kid stuff, 
but I'd almost be willing to go out and 
give that kid the beating of his stuck-up 
life. • The unmitigated gall of it!" 

For a moment Hazel too looked rather 
grim. Then she smiled and laid her h^nd 
lightly over Dan's. "No matter. It's Mar- 
garet who counts. And if she can take it, 
we can too!" 

She came down the next morning with 
some trepidation. Would reaction have 
set in? Maybe Margaret had merely been 
numbed by shock and her real despair 
would only begin to show gradually? There 
was the problem of the dress, too; it had 
been expensive, and couldn't be allowed 
to simply sit unused at the back of the 
closet. Not when Margaret could use a 
new suit and a few new sweaters to much 
better advantage. 

But Margaret seemed quite composed. 



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97 



m 



Pale, but steady, she ate an enormous 
breakfast, and then asked if she could go 
over to her grandmother's. She wanted 
to tell Cliff he needn't bother about the 
car. Cliff, Hazel thought, will have some- 
thing to say about that Rodney Dwyer. 
Cliff, the sophisticated bachelor, was Mar- 
garet's idea of a man-about-town. His 
contempt of Rodney's crass behaviour 
would certainly be a valuable support for 
Margaret. 

But Cliff, apparently, was even more up- 
set than Hazel had expected. He called up 
and announced, full of righteous wrath, 
that . they would soon see about people 
treating any niece of Clifford Barbour's in 
that fashion. "I, myself," he said, "will 
take that girl of yours to the dance. She'll 
have the best time of any of them." 

"Darling, that's wonderful!" Hazel said 
happily. 

"Well, it's the least I can do. Poor kid. 
And what's more she'll be the prettiest 
girl there. I'll see to that!" 

Rescued, thought Hazel elatedly. How 
wonderful! The dress would be worn 
after all, and the car — Margaret would 
have the satisfaction of parading in the 
Bernadotte before all of them! Granted, 
going with your uncle was just a cut or 
two above going with your brother — but on 
the other band everybody knew how popu- 
lar Cliff was. If he was willing to forego 
his own engagements to spend a Saturday 
night with his niece, didn't it stand to 
reason — wouldn't the boys reason — that 
Margaret must have quite a lot to offer? 

A little later, when Margaret came home, 
Hazel ran lightly downstairs to greet her, 
prepared for an overflow of effusion. But 
Margaret didn't seem excited. Yes, she 
agreed. Uncle Cliff had said he would take 
her to the dance. That was fine, she could 
wear her dress; it wouldn't be wasted. 

"But aren't you pleased? You'll have a 
wonderful time with Cliff. Even better — " 
she stopped herself in the nick of time. 

"Oh, I know, Uncle Cliff's a super 
dancer. It's swell." Margaret, seeing that 
her mother wasn't satisfied, added earn- 
estly, "It really is swell, Mother. Don't 
think I don't appreciate it. Only — " She 
frowned, and her eyes took on that vague, 
puzzled look that always disturbed Hazel. 
Only this time Margaret wasn't vague, 
really. She was thinking. "Mother, do 
you remember Aunt Isobel?" she asked. 

"Isobel." Hazel thought hard for a 
moment. Isobel. Dimly she recalled a 
thin, rather homely woman, tall, spinster- 
ish. . . she couldn't decide whether she 
really remembered her or whether she had 
simply seen pictures of her. In any case — 
"Vaguely," she said. "Why?" 

Margaret sighed. "She had a blighted 
romance, too. She never married. Grand- 
father told me." 

Oh, dear! Hazel thought. Oh, no — not 
that! Anything would be better than to 
have Margaret drooping around the house, 
dramatizing her plight as a rejected 
woman, identifying herself with all the 
unhappy love affairs of all time. . . Spare 
us, she thought fervently. "She was just 
a sharp-tongued old maid, that's all," she 
said rather harshly. "Nothing romantic 
about Isobel. I don't know what Grand- 
R father told you, but he was probably just 
u pulling your leg. Why don't you go up- 
stairs and rest a while, since you're going 

out tonight after all." 
98 



"All right." Margaret trailed upstairs 
obediently, but she still looked vague. A 
short time later she called down from the 
head of the stairs. "Mother? What about 
Aunt Claudia — didn't she have another 
love affair before Uncle Nick, even? And 
Uncle Cliff had two wives, didn't he?" 

"What about it?" Hazel called back. 
What now — what strange tack was this the 
child was taking? She didn't like it. It 
would be better if she were carrying on 
about her disappointment, or swearing ven- 
geance at Rodney and Geraldine, or even 
refusing to eat and locking herself in her 
room. . . But not this! 

There was no further sound from up- 
stairs, and Hazel went back to her lemon 
pie. But she was still disturbed, and 
slowly a vague suspicion at the back of 
her mind became more definite. Knowing 
Margaret . . . yes, knowing Margaret, it 
was possible. She could forget about the 
dance — at least forget about how important 
it had been yesterday — if she had suddenly 
developed another enthusiasm to take its 
place! But could she be as much of a 
child as that, still? Curiosity drove Hazel 




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upstairs. She had to find out, somehow. . 

Margaret wasn't resting at all. Con 
torted over her desk, she was busily scrib 
bling away, with a fat yellow pile of paper 
and several newly-sharpened pencils be 
fore her. She glanced up as the door 
opened, and grinned. "Mother, it's going 
to be swell — terrific! I've got to phone 
Grandfather and thank him." 

"Thank him for what?" Hazel asked 
cautiously. She peered over Margaret's 
shoulder at what looked like a list of 
names. "What goes on?" 

"Thank him for the idea, of course." 
Margaret added a name, underlined it,' and 
and threw down her pencil. "Oh, I for- 
got, I didn't tell you. Listen, we got to 
talking, Uncle Cliff and Grandfather and 
I — Grandmother was out in the garden, so 
she couldn't interrupt the way she does, 
though of course I always like to talk to 
her—" 

Hazel was conscious of a too familiar 
sensation. Margaret's on her horse again! 
Full speed ahead, all the details jumbled 
together so that you had to pick and poke 
to get the story — "Tell me simply," she 
said in desperation. "What did you talk 
about?" 

"I'm going to write a book, that's what! 
The Barbour Book, maybe I'll call it — or 
we'll think of something else. But anyway 



it got started with Aunt Isobel, and how 
she was blighted — I mean her love life, and 
that started because of me and Rodney, of 
course, though it's not important consider- 
ing what a cheap character Rodney turned 
out to be — and then I got thinking about 
all the other romances that have happened 
in this family, with Uncle Cliff and Aunt 
Claudia and Uncle Paul, even, though I 
don't know how I'm going to get him to 
talk, but we'll see. . . And I can have pic- 
tures to illustrate it and everything. Isn't 
it stupendous?" Margaret finished on a 
squeal of excitement. "Grandfather says 
he'll tell me lots of stuff about San Fran- 
cisco in the old days, and Mother — Uncle 
Cliff even said one of his school friends was 
a publisher and maybe he'd look at it when 
it was finished. I've started already, see?" 

She waved her list under Hazel's nose. 
It was, indeed, quite long already. Hazel 
felt the grip of apprehension. If Mar- 
garet went around sticking her nose into 
all the old family love stories . . . 

Then all her apprehension faded as she 
met Margaret's clear, bright, absorbed 
blue eyes. And the child had such color — 
why, it was like last week when she'd 
first heard about the dance, only better, 
much better! Bending, she kissed Mar- 
garet's forehead. 

"I think it's a tremendous idea. Re- 
mind me tomorrow and I'll give you some 
pictures myself. But darling, look — it's 
getting rather late. Don't you want me to 
set your hair before you shower?" 

"I guess so," Margaret said. "Just a 
sec." She licked her pencil and made a 
note, and then got up. "I couldn't work 
on it tonight anyway. Besides, I guess 
even real authors go out on Saturday night. 
They say no matter how devoted you are 
to your art you have to take some time off 
or you get sort of stale or something." 

Hazel got the yellow dress from the 
closet and shook it out, hanging it on the 
giraffe-shaped clothestree that had been in 
Margaret's room from the time she was 
an infant. Margaret came up beside her, 
looking at the dress from half-closed eyes. 

"Beauty, huh?" she said. "I guess I 
won't disgrace Uncle Cliff. Gee — wait till 
I tell him, Mother." 

"Tell him — you mean that you won't dis- 
grace him?" 

"Oh, Mother!" Margaret gave a guf- 
faw. "Tell him about the book! Wait till I 
tell him I've made an outline!" 

Well, thought Hazel, I guess I'll have 
something to tell him too. That I was 
definitely right, about Margaret's not being 
ready yet to become a real adolescent. I'm 
glad I didn't get myself all worked up 
about that Geraldine. She knew what she 
was doing, yes, but as long as Margaret 
didn't, quite. . . what harm? Some girls 
mature so much later than others. With 
sudden fierce emotion, she offered up a 
little prayer of gratitude that she was to 
be allowed after all to have Margaret as a 
child for just a little longer. It might be 
only months. . . but it was something. 

Margaret, looking for a hairnet, said 
thoughtfully, "On the other hand, maybe I 
shouldn't talk to Uncle Paul. He might 
be too — too reserved, don't you think? 
Mother — would you do it for me?" 

"We'll see," Hazel said. "We'll see, 
dear." She must, she thought, remember 
to tell Dan, when she went downstairs, 
that Margaret was off to the races again. 






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OCTOBER, 1951 RADIO-TV MIRROR 



36, NO. 5 



READER'S DIGEST* Reported The Same 

Research Which Proves That Brushing Teeth 

Right After Eating with 

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM 
STOPS TOOTH DECAY BEST 

Reader's Digest recently reported the 
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Contents 

Keystone Edition 

Doris McFerran, Editor; Jack Zasorin, Art Director; Matt Basile, Art Editor; 

Marie Haller, Assistant Editor; Frances Kish, Television Assistant; 

Dorothy Brand, Editorial Assistant; Esther Foley, Home Service Director; 

Helen Cambria Bolstad, Chicago Editor; Lyle Rooks, Hollywood Editor; 

Frances Morrin, Hollywood Assistant Editor; fiymie Fink, Staff Photographer ; 

Betty Jo Rice, Assistant Photographer 



People 

on the 

Air 



For 
Better 
living 



Your 

Local 

Station 



Inside 

Radio 

and TV 



Fred R. Sammis, Editor-in-Chief 



8 Perils of Peary 

12 Stars on Parade 

18 Claudia Pinza 

29 Q & A on Color TV 

30 It All Adds Up to Happiness 

32 Gini Puts Up With Me ... by Alan Young 

34 They Filled My Heart With Hope ... by Ann Kane 

36 This Is Nora Drake 

38 I've Got My Fingers Crossed! ... by Mary Hartline 

40 Five Little Linkletters 

42 Did You Say Glamour? ... by Martin Cohen 

44 Anne Malone Asks: Where Does My Happiness Lie? 

48 Lux Video Theatre 

SO At Home With Herman 

52 Tom Corbett, Space Cadet 

•54 Steve Allen, Himself 

56 My Brother, Sam ... by Albert Levenson 

Special Section: Cops 'n' Robbers 

62 This Is Your FBI 

64 Mr. Detective 

66 Casey, Crime Photographer 

68 Junior Mirror 

70 RTVM Reader Bonus: Pixie Finds a Home 

21 Poetry 

22 Dressing For A Date 

26 Family Counselor: A Pet In Your Home 

58 Daytime Fashions For You 

60 Tasty Tidbits ... by Nancy Craig 

78 Fun of the Month 

6 WHDH: Three-Letter Man 

10 WTAR: Chipmunk Club 
14 WINS: Starr Reviewer 
16 WLAW: "Love My Dog" 

4 Information Booth 

11 Help Wanted! 

24 Who's Who In TV 

75 Daytime Diary 

79 Program Highlights in Television Viewing 

On the Cover: Art Linkletter portrait by Fink &■ Smith 
Mary Hartline portrait by Charles L. McShane 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfaddcn Publications, Inc., New 
York, N. Y. , average net paid circulation 470,024 for 6 
months ending June 30, 1950. 

EXECUTIVE, ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES at 
205 East 42nd street, New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices: 321 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
221 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. Harold A. Wise, Presi- 
dent; David N. Laux and Fred R. Sammis, vice Presidents; 
Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treasurer, Advertising offices 
also in Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $2.50 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
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CHANGE OF ADDRESS: 6 weeks' notice essential. When pos- 
sible, please furnish stencil impression address from a recent 
issue. Address changes can be made only if you send us your 

Member of The TRUE 



old as well as your new address. Write to Radio-TV Mirror, 
205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 

MANUSCRIPTS. DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS should be 
accompanied by addressed envelope and return postage and 
will be carefully considered, but publisher cannot be re- 
sponsible for loss or injury. 

Re-entered as Second Class Matter Feb. 13, 1951, at the 
Post Office at New York, N. Y. , under the Act of March 3, 
1879. Authorized as Second Class mail, P.O. Dept., Ottawa, 
Ont., Canada. Copyright 1951 by Macfadden Pablications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Americana de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title trademark 
registered in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
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11III 



Ask your questions — 

we'll try to find the answers 



Sudroiv Statistics 

Would you please print a picture of 
Lyle Sudrow who plays Bill Bauer on the 
daytime serial, Guiding Light. How old is 
he and how long has he been acting? 

M. D., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

This handsome thirty-two-year-old actor 
has been haunting the theatre since the 
age of eight when he made his debut, tap 
dancing in a minstrel show. Before he was 
inducted in the Coast Guard, he sang in 
theatres, and night clubs. Upon return to 
civilian life, having married singer-actress, 
Diana Cheswick, he turned to radio as a 
more stable life for a family man. He has 
one daughter, Nicole, seven. 

Our Mistake 

Dear Editor: 

In your July issue you stated Clyde 
Beatty was married. I thought when I read 
it that you were mistaken since his wife, 
Harriett, died some time ago. In last 
night's paper I see proof of it so I am 
enclosing the clipping. 

J. J. McM., Decatur, Ga. 

The clipping stated that on June 28, 
1951, Clyde Beatty and Mrs. Lorraine 
Abel, obtained a license to wed. Clyde's 
former wife, Harriett, died last fall. 

Family Affairs 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to know something about 
Buster Crabbe. Is he married and how 
many children does he have, if any? I 




Lyle Sudrow 



Buster Crabbe 



would appreciate it if you could send me 
a picture of him. 

J. S., West Grove, Pa. 
Sorry that we don't have any picture to 
send you, but hope the shot below will do 
as a substitute. Buster Crabbe lives with 
his family, daughters Sande, fourteen. 
Susan, twelve, and son Cuffy, six, on a 
beautiful little ranch near Covina, Cali- 
fornia. 

A Twosome? 

Dear Editor: 

I have been told that Kate Smith and 
Ted Collins are married. Is this true? If 
so, have they ever had any children? 

Mrs. C. E., Leechburg, Pa. 

Rumor is wrong — Kate Smith is not 
married. Ted Collins is, however, and will 
boast of his two grandchildren at the 
drop of a cue. 

Raby Rooters 

Dear Editor: 

Would you please tell me what has hap- 
pened to John Raby who played Don 
Smith on Wendy Warren and the News, 
and Harry Davis on When a Girl Marries. 
We all thought he had such an outstand- 
ing voice and so enjoyed his portrayal of 
Don Smith. 

Mrs. R. E. J., St. Paul, Minn. 

Much to the regret of his many fans. 
John, who was a member of the active 
reserve, was recently called back into 
service. 




Kate Smith 



Singing Couple 

Dear Editor: 

Would you please tell me if Curt Massey 
and Martha Tilton are related. We listen 
to them every evening and love to hear 
them sing. 

Mrs. H. A. R., Mansfield, Ohio 

The singing stars of Curt Massey Time 
are not related to each other. Curt Massey, 
however, is married, while Martha Tilton 
is not. The Massey family, wife Edyth and 
son Stephen, live in Beverly Hills. 

Quiz Couple 

Dear Editor: 

Some time ago I read that the cast on 
Bill Slater's Twenty Questions consisted 
of the VanDeventers, Herb Polesie and 
Johnny McPhee. Will you please tell me 
if Van, Florence and Johnny are related 
and how? 

Mrs. H. D. B., Washington, D. C. 

Florence Rinard and Fred VanDeventer 
are known as the VanDeventers in their 
home town. Johnny is not related to 
either of them, nor is Herb Polesie, the 
fourth member of the panel. 



Iteteetive Work 

Dear Editor: 

Could you please give me some informa- 
tion on John McQuade who starred on 
Charlie Wild, Private Detective? On 
what other television shows has he ap- 
peared? 

L. E. G., Guthrie, Okla. 

John McQuade who has starred in such 
TV productions as Sure as Fate and Star- 
light Theatre, took over as Charlie Wild 
on March 25, 1951. This thirty-four-year- 
old native of Pittsburgh began his career 
as a boy soprano. After studying music 
and voice at Columbia University, he 
landed his first job as a professional 
actor in "I'd Rather Be Right." Since 
then he has played everything from 
Shakespeare on Broadway to soap opera. 
He also had a major role in the film, "The 
Naked City." 



I 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
Radio Television Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y. We'll answer if we 
can either in Information Booth or by mail 
— but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter along with a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope, and specify whether your ques- 
tion concerns radio or TV. 




The VanDeventers 



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man 



Gurt Gowdy. WHDH sports- 
caster for all Red Sox games, 
is known in Boston as a three- 
letter man — one who takes top hon- 
ors whether he broadcasts baseball, 
football or basketball. Curt joined 
WHDH after a two year stint with 
Mel Allen on the broadcasts and 
telecasts of the New York Yankee 
games. 

Selected by the New York Times 
as the top sports announcer of 1950, 
in their Honor Roll of Radio and 
TV performers, Curt is in the same 
top-flight bracket as Jimmy Durante 
for comedy and Fred Waring for 
music. Curt's citation read: "To 
Curt Gowdy, the announcer, who, 
be it baseball, football or basketball, 
sticks to straight reporting and ab- 
jures synthetic excitement, expertis- 
ing or catch-phrases." 

Born thirty-one years ago in Chey- 
enne, Wyoming, Curt started winning 
sports laurels long before he ever 
thought of broadcasting. A graduate 
of Wyoming University, Curt Gowdy 
was a six-letter athlete in basketball, 
baseball and tennis. He played on 
Wyoming's nationally famous bas- 
ketball teams from 1940-1942. On 
receiving a B.S. degree. Curt entered 
the Army Air Corps. He incurred 
a spinal injury in flight training and 
was medically discharged as a Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. 

In 1943, Curt started his radio 
career in his home town of Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. After broadcasting sports 
for two years for station KFBC, Curt 
went to Oklahoma City where for 
four years he broadcast the Okla- 
homa University football games, and 
the baseball games of the Oklahoma 




City Club — members of the Texas 
League. In the spring of 1948, Curt 
joined Mel Allen to broadcast the 
Yankees games and this year moved 
to WHDH, Boston, to do the Red 
Sox home and road games for the 
1951 season. In addition to broad- 
casting the play-by-play broadcasts 
of the Red Sox games. Curt also 
does a daily ten-minute program. 
Curt Gowdy's Report on Sports, over 
WHDH. 

When Curt has some time oft from 
work he hies himself to a nearby 
stream and tackles "the ones that 
don't get away." This year, however, 
he's going to tangle with the big 
ones out on the ocean. Curt is mar- 
ried to the former Jerre Dawkins 
of Edmond, Oklahoma, and they 
have one child, Cheryl Ann. 



Curt Gowdy, WHDH 
broadcaster for all 
Red Sox games, 
wins honors wherever 
he goes. First as a 
top college athlete, 
now as a top sportscaster 
in Boston. 



The following stores carry the 
Jvisior Deb suit ois page 58: 

Altoona, Pa., 

THE WILLIAM F. GABLE CO. 

• 
Bakersfield, Calif., 
WEILL'S, INC. 

• 
Charlotte, N. C, 
EFIRD'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Covington, Kentucky, 
JOHN R. COPPIN 

• 
Erie, Pa., 
TRASK'S 

• 
Great Falls, Montana, 
BUTTREY'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

• 
Lafayette, Indiana, 
LOEB'S 

Lansing, Michigan, 
F. N. ARBAUGH CO. 

• 
New Haven, Conn., 
SHARTENBERG'S, INC. 

• 
Olean, New York, 
BRADNER'S 

Providence, Rhode Island, 
THE SHEPARD STORE 



The accessories featured with the suit 
and on page 59 are available at most of 
these stores. 

For further information write direct to: 

Arkwright 

128 West 31st Street 

New York 1, N. Y. 



LISTEN TO 

Hollywood Love Story 

A complete romantic drama 
presented on each program. 
Cal York, famed PHOTO- 
PLAY Magazine reporter, digs 
into Hollywood's love life for 
these heart-palpitating stories. 
Also latest Hollywood news. 

• • • • 

Every Saturday 

morning, 11 A. M. 

EST, NBC 













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A beautiful Sunday morning, and Hal 
Peary intends to show son, Page, how 
much fun he can have in Kiddieland. 
Page is off on the miniature train. 



Th 



e perils 




R 

M 



i ISow, look-a-here, son — you've got to 
grip that horse with your knees." Hal, 
the expert horseman, gives Page a briefing 
before he sends him out on the pony ride. 



"Okay, Pop. Now hold tight to his neck 
and don't take any brass rings." Son Page 
pulls a turnabout and launches Dad on his 
first merry-go-round ride in ??? years. 



fc- : ^:*SK>': : '!~:: 







of Peary 



Hal Peary takes his son to 
the local carnival, hut 
discovers — alas — that Kiddieland 
is strictly for little kids 




The end of a perfect day. Hal is trying to think of a 
nice, trusty St. Bernard he can send along to shepherd 
Page on the next expedition. Page offers him some hot 
popcorn; Dad looks as if he'd prefer a hot footbath. 

Listen to the Hal Peary Show every Wednesday evening at 
nine over Columbia Broadcasting System radio stations. 



R 
M 



Whipmunk 



ub 



An odd assortment of characters are 
heard, but never seen, on Brother 
Trafton Robertson's WTAR Sunrise 
Serenade. There are three tiny chipmunks, 
Bertha, Suzie and Charlie, who occasion- 
ally render startling vocal renditions; there 
is old Grandpap who is never without his 
beloved jug of "swamp water," guaranteed 
to relieve all aches and pains. These crea- 
tures materialize periodically to help 
Brother Robertson maintain a large and 
faithful audience for his "Chipmunk Club." 

Good "CuipmunKers" follow the rules 
and regulations of the "Club." They in- 
clude such solid admonitions as : Mind your 
Mama and Daddy; Eat all your food; 
brush your teetn daily; wash behind your 
ears, too; be polite to everybody — especial- 
ly Grandmas and Grandpas. 

Trafton Robertson (pronounced Tee- 
Rafton) has been the morning personality 
on WTAR since 1946. It was also with 
WTAR that he started in radio back in 
1932. After four years as an announcer 
he left the station for ten years, working 
in various capacities at radio stations from 
New York to Tulsa. While in Washington 
he handled presidential broadcasts and 
sometimes subbed for Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
After Norman Brokenshire left WMAL, 
Trafton took over his early morning Town 
Clock show. 

Trafton is one of those people who is 
never completely happy unless he is 
helping someone. He has just finished 
collecting over $500 — more than he re- 
quested — as the result of only two pleas 




Much to the delight of all good Chipmunk Club 
listeners, Bertha, Charlie and Susie prepare to sound 
off under the direction of maestro Trafton Robertson. 




WTAR's Trafton Robertson and his favorite off-the- 
air activity — relaxing at home with the family. 
That's wife, Sigrid, with young Carolyn and Richard. 



to his listeners to finance an unusual oper- 
ation for a twenty-one months' old child. On 
two other occasions recently, when large 
families were burned out of their houses, 
he instituted campaigns which pulled in 
furniture, groceries and money to more 
than meet the emergencies. 

Trafton has two standard promotions on 
which he assists. One is the Community 
Toy Shop, which last Christmas provided 
toys and necessities to 3,500 underpriv- 
ileged children; the other is the Easter 
Basket campaign which provides Easter 



baskets for otherwise "forgotten"' children 
and adults in city homes, hospitals and or- 
phanages. 

In addition to his early morning radio 
show, Trafton appears on WTAR-TV each 
Saturday evening, announcing stock car 
and midget auto races. He also manages, 
somehow to put in regular office hours as 
district manager in his area for the In- 
ternational Accountants Society of Chicago. 
Besides this, Trafton is a soloist at church 
and in his "spare" time steps out for some 
deep sea fishing. 



10 



_ 



HELP WANTED! 



RADIO-TV MIRROR is your magazine. We've tried to make it a magazine you 
want to read each month and, in order to keep it that kind of magazine, we're asking 
you, its readers, to help us. Please give your answers by filling out the blanks in the 
following questions. Cut out and mail to: RADIO-TV MIRROR Reader Survey, 
205 E. 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. You don't have to give us your name. 



First, about you: Age Sex 

Married? Occupation How 

many children? Do you own, or 

have regular access to, a radio set? ... . 
a television set? At a rough 

estimate, how many hours a day do you 

listen to radio? watch television? 

What other magazines do you 
read and enjoy regularly? 



Would you prefer to see RADIO-TV 
MIRROR's color pages devoted to: Por- 
traits of radio stars? of TV stars? 

... Home-life pictures of radio stars? 
of TV stars? On-stage pic- 
tures of TV shows? Radio show 

casts in action? 

Do you listen to daytime serials? 

How many each day, on the average? 
.... To quiz and audience participa- 
tion shows on radio? .... on TV? .... 



Now, about your magazine: Would you 

like RADIO-TV MIRROR to have more 

stories about radio programs and stars n . , 

, , L Tir Which radio programs and stars, that 

than at present ( or about IV i , . i ■, , . 

, have not been already included in 

programs and stars? RADIO-TV MIRROR stories, would you 

Would you like to have more stories like to read about? 

about radio programs themselves ... 

how they're run, how they look when 

being put on the air, etc.? .... or about 

TV programs themselves? Which TV programs and stars? 

Would you like more stories about radio 
stars, their families and homes? .... 
or about TV stars? 



Would you like most of the emphasis in 
the magazine to be on daytime radio? 
.... Night-time radio ? ... . Daytime TV 
... Or night-time TV? 

Do you like the features which run every 
month in RADIO-TV MIRROR, such as 
Art Linkletter's Nonsense and Some- 
Sense? . Bonus Novel?. . . . Fun of 
the Month? . Poetry? . . Family 
Counselor? ... Beauty? . Fashion? 
.... Junior Mirror? . . Information 

Booth? . . . . Who's Who in TV? 

Which story in this issue did you like 

best? on page 

Least? on page 



If you have other opinions about our 
magazine which have not been covered 
by the questions, please put them in 
this space ... 




You, too, could be more 

confident 

appealing 

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11 




: 










Stars 
on parade 

Your favorites from 

every corner of the entertainment 

field recruit for Uncle Sam 



Name ALMOST any top star you can think of — 
and chances are that he has appeared on 
Stars on Parade, the official weekly radio show of 
the U. S. Army and U. S. Air Force Recruiting 
Service. For its first program, back in 1940, the 
show carried the voice of the biggest star of the 
day — President Franklin D. Roosevelt — with an 
excerpt from his famous pre-World War II de- 
fense speech to Congress. 

When the series began it was known as Voice 
of the Army and featured martial music by mili- 
tary bands with recruiting messages from high- 
ranking officers. Later programs, to meet chang- 
ing needs of the day, started to carry dramatized 
incidents of training experiences and war-time 
episodes of the battlefronts. 

After the war, the need arose to dramatize the 
advantages of a peacetime Army and Air Force; 
the show began to present top talent in musical, 
dramatic, comic and documentary programs. 




It's a pleasant, relaxed 

evening for everyone when Perry Como 

joins the Stars on Parade roster 

for the show called "Guess Who." Perry 

is just one of the hundreds of stars 

who has been heard on this 

fifteen-minute transcribed program. 



"George!" says 

Jerry Lester as he 

lends his talent 

to Uncle Sam in the 

Stars on Parade show 

called "Supersonic 

Swizzlestick." 





A pre-show conference 
centers around the charming British 
actress, Grade Fields, star of 
"International Sweetheart." Giving 
suggestions are director Charles 
Wilkes, announcer Joe Ripley 
and Lt. Robert B. Schall. 



Below: A tense moment 
in "The Little Guy," 
another production of Stars 
on Parade. This one stars 
the famous comedian, Edward 
Everett Horton, in an 
unusual radio drama. 





Right: Film star 
Gene Tierney makes 
a tempting recruiter 
as she and Gladys 
Klark enact 
"Midnight Sailing." 



Barbara Britton 

makes a few script 

changes while 

co-star Glenn Langan chats 

with music director 

Johnny Guarnieri and script 

writer Sgt. Downs. 



"Tales from Caesar" 
starred the television 
comic, Sid Caesar. 
Announcer Joe Ripley is at 
the left; band leader 
Milton DeLugg supplies 
the accordion music. 




13 




reviewer 



The letter came from one of the top 
actresses of the day. It expressed her 
thanks for a favorable review given 
her recent stage effort. This was only one 
piece of mail in the daily bundle that 
Martin Starr, Broadway and Hollywood 
Reporter for Radio Station WINS, re- 
ceives. The letter was a singularly odd 
one since Martin Starr does not write for 
the newspapers, which are often con- 
sidered the barometer registering either hit 
or flop. It is a definite sign that the people 
of and in the theatre regard Mr. Starr's 
radio reviews as important as those read 
in the dailies. 

When he was fresh out of Columbia 
School of Journalism, Starr made the 
usual rounds of newspapers seeking to put 
his new-found knowledge to use. Having 
received his share of "We'll get in touch 
if anything turns up," he finally landed a 
job at the Graphic, incubator for many 
of today's newspaper greats. Working side 
by side with Winchell, Sobol and Sullivan, 
Starr began developing his now famous 
reportorial technique. 

In 1931 after six years at the Graphic 
he began writing for various magazines 
including True Story. This job was fol- 
lowed by a two-year stint with the Great 
Ziegfeld. Hired as a talent scout, Martin 
Starr uncovered more than his share of 
talent and bestowed the accolade "Ziegfeld 
Girl" on the then unknowns like Dorothy 
Dell, Dorothy Lamour and Boots Mallory, 



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to name just a few. Shortly thereafter he 
organized the first "Miss Universe" con- 
test, a beauty pageant that mushroomed 
into an international affair. 

In 1934 he joined a local radio station 
to begin his Movie Starr Dust broadcasts, 
the first Hollywood gossip column of the 
air and the beginning of the most impor- 
tant phase of his career. 

It has often been asked, "How can a man 
some three thousand miles away from his 
beat, Hollywood, come up with so many 
'exclusives'?" The answer is simple; Stan- 
knows personally 95% of the people about 
whom he talks. A gregarious fellow who 
makes friends easily, his trips to the coast 
on various assignments found him making 
new friends on each visit. 

In 1946 when the Crosley Broadcasting 
Corporation took over the operation of 
WINS, Starr was hired to handle the 
Hollywood gossip broadcasts. Doing his 
own leg work and research often proved 



invaluable to this reporter of the ether 
waves, especially in view of the incongru- 
ous statements sent out by the local pub- 
licity offices. 

In recent months Starr has been asked 
to cover the Broadway scene for WINS 
under the heading of Broadway Starr Dust. 
Opening of this new facet proved a boon 
to Starr listeners. He presents a review 
that tells in a minimum of detail whether 
the play is good or bad, and most impor- 
tant, why. 

With all this attention from his listeners, 
the man who began some seventeen years 
ago as the first Hollywood gossip column- 
ist of the air confesses his greatest 
thrill came one night last month when 
he entered a theatre and took his place 
among the other first night reviewers. He 
found that seated on his left was Ed Sulli- 
van and on his right was Louis Sobol, his 
old co-workers on the Graphic. "It was 
only then that I felt that I had arrived." 



A 

M 



14 






HAPPY BRIDE CONTEST WINNERS 

Here are the names of those who submitted the best jingles and party 
suggestions to our Happy Bride Contest 

First Prize: A year's supply of Best Food Products to Mrs. Sidney Mcllveen, 

Houston, Texas. 
Second Prize: A complete set of 1847 Rogers Bros. Silverplate to Mrs. 

P. W. Schumacher, Youngstown, Ohio. 
Third Prize: A "Tyrolean" Embroidered Velvet Handbag to Mrs. Barbara 

Constant, El Paso, Texas. 
Fourth Prize: A Ceil Chapman party gown to Mrs. Mack Halliburton, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Fifth Prize: A Westinghouse Roaster Oven to J. G. Boren, Houston, Texas. 
Sixth Prize: Leonid de Lescinskis French perfume to Mrs. Anita Pillow, 

Hyattsville, Maryland. 
Seventh Prize: Our check for $10.00 to Mrs. Marjorie Smith, Everett, Wash. 
Eighth Prize: Another check for $10.00 to Mrs. Elva Jones, Ogden, Utah. 
Ninth Prize: A third $10.00 check to Mrs. Rae Cross, Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 

Ten Runner-up Prizes of $5.00 each to: 

Dorothy Marble, Kenmore, N. Y. 

Mrs. Walter C. Miller, Anacortes, Wash. 

Mrs. Caroline E. Wilson, Louisville, Ky. 

Mrs. Grace Smith, Austin, Texas. 

Mrs. Frederick B. Gump, Long Beach, Calif. 

Mrs. J. B. Banks, Albany, Georgia. 

Mrs. Audrey H. Wright, Memphis, Tenn. 

Mrs. Harry R. Stuart, Piedmont, Calif. 

Mrs. Sara Sandt, Madison, N. J. 

Helen L. Altimus, Indiana, Penna. 




i 



GENE AUTRY PRIZE ROUND-UP WINNERS 

Here are the names of the boys and girls whose illustrations for Gene 
Autry's Code of the West rules were considered best by our judges 

First Prize: A real Gene Autry Monark Bicycle to Mary Anne Trenchard, 
Akron, Ohio. 

Second and Third Prizes: The Gene Autry Six-Shooter Watch to Barbara 
McNally, Concord, Calif., and Shirley Kraemer, Stewartville, Minn. 

Fourth and Fifth Prizes: The official Gene Autry Gun and Holster set to 
Janice Nye, Ogden, Utah, and Colleen Tess, Spokane, Wash. 

Eighteen Runner-up Prizes: The Gene Autry Electric Pencil goes to the 
following: 

Patsy Thomas, Carlyle, Saskatchewan, Canada. 

Lorraine Golda, Fraser, Mich. 

Dorothy Christy. Massapequa, New York. 

Joan Buzzard, Winlock, Wash. 

Lyle Whitacre, Brighton, Iowa. 

Sylvia Pflimlin, LaMesa, Calif. 

William Burkett, Augusta, Ga. 

Robert G. Jarrett, Bassett, Va. 

Sandra Baker, Burnsville, West Va. 

Jerry Reis, Battleground, Wash. 

Judy Kolb, Liberty, Indiana. 

James McMillan, Laurel, Md. 

G. Hansalik, Lancaster, Penna. 

Gerald Eddington, Ardmore, Okla. 

Steven W. Craig, Columbus, Ohio. 

Pamela Nicholson, Kansas City, Mo. 

Jackie Gene Howard, Corsicana, Texas. 

Patty Sommers, Youngwood, Penna. 





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15 



// 



Love my dog" 




Two New England favorites — Georgia Mae and her equally enchanting pal, Baby, give 
out with a top song over their WLAW program. The two of them make early rising 
a lot easier for everyone from the Boston Red Sox to the Harvard senior class. 
Incidentally, the costume, except for hat and guitar, is a Georgia Mae original. 



New England radio listeners have 
been pouring affections for the past 
few years upon the glistening, burn- 
ished gold hair of Georgia Mae, who with 
her music and song helps welcome the 
dawn for WLAW audiences on Monday, 
Tuesday and Thursday mornings at six- 
fifteen. 

But now, the twenty-two-year-old beauty 
with the sparkling blue eyes has to share 
the mike — and the listeners' affection — 
with her eig;iteen-mont'i-oid white Spitz 
dog, "Baby." The dog's debut a few 
months ago brought a flood of congratula- 
tory cards and letters from all corners of 
the area. 

Remember the old caution pretty girls 
used to deliver to their swains: "Love Me, 
Love My Dog!" Well, Georgia Mae doesn't 
have to be so dictatorial. They're both 
easy to love; Georgia Mae with blue eyes, 



burnished gold hair, chic and cute, and 
"Baby," curly white, with pleading eyes, 
and affectionate. 

New England radio listeners have taken 
both to their hearts, which is the reason 
why so many find it easier to get up in 
the morning when they know Georgia Mae 
is waiting at their radio dials. 

Since WLAW took over on June 15th of 
this year as the Greater Boston Station for 
the American Broadcasting Company, 
Georgia Mae's audience has grown rapid- 
ly. She is at home with Boston folks be- 
cause her home is in Dedham which is on 
the outskirts of the Hub of the Universe. 
A native of Colorado, Georgia Mae is a 
Bostonian and New Englander by choice. 
If the Coloradoans want to make some- 
thing of it, Georgia Mae will have the 
Boston Red Sox in her corner, not to men- 
tion the entire Harvard senior class. 



1 



16 







'p&jWwfc. 'BhhCf Oat Beauft 



H 



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/i?/- /£/ 0/- Sfiower Get 

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The "tissue test" proved to Lucille . • • 



11% 



i \ 




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that Woodbury floats out hidden dirt! 



Do you feel that all cleansing creams are 
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We asked her to cleanse her face with 
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The tissue told a startling story ! Wood- 
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18 



Woodbury 
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floats out hidden dirt. . . 
penetrates deeper because it contains Penaten 




CLAUDIA PINZA 



It was no great surprise to anyone when, 
following the years of hardship she 
had spent in Italy during the war — 
studying singing between bombings — 
Claudia Pinza, daughter of Ezio Pinza. 
appeared on the American scene, bent on 
a singing career. What did surprise peo- 
ple was that she made no effort to trade 
on his name, and though she has appeared 
with him a few times, she has made her 
own way. 

Claudia first determined to come to 
America after acting as nurse-interpreter 
for wounded G.I.'s in Army hospitals. Her 
contacts with our American lads made her 
decide that she would marry only an 
American. She used to give concerts for 
the patients in these hospitals whenever 
the opportunity offered, and on one of 
these occasions an American promoter, vis- 
iting in Italy, heard her and made arrange- 
ments for her to come to the U. S. 

Claudia had made her debut in opera 
in Milan at the age of seventeen; now it 
became necessary to let American audi- 
ences hear her. After a successful Ameri- 
can debut in Washington she was engaged 
for both the San Francisco and Metropoli- 
tan Opera companies, and later launched 
herself on three consecutive, successful 
country-wide concert tours. 

Then she decided she wanted to "sing 
for everybody," not just the audience that 
enjoys opera and concerts. She took a 
bold step for a serious musical artist — 
perhaps a leaf from her father's book 
— and accepted an offer to appear at New 
York's famous citadel of vaudeville, the 
Palace Theatre. The hardened vaudeville 
patrons loved her; the Broadway critics 
and trade papers gave her rave notices and 
supper club operators began to make in- 
quiries about her. 

Radio and television have seen and 
heard her on such programs as the Tele- 
phone Hour, the Toast of the Town, the 
Faye Emerson show, and the Steve Allen 
show. Unless we miss our bet, she will 
be seen and heard with growing frequency 
over the air and on the nation's TV screens. 

In private life Claudia has realized her 
wish to marry an American. She is the 
wife of John Boiler, who acts as her per- 
sonal representative. They have a two-year- 
old son. 




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THE EASY ^SHAMPOO-WAY' IN QUICK *S HAM POO -TIM eV 



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Enjoy the comfort of lovely new color 
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Years of tested experi- 
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HI HOW IASY II IS fOK YOU TO HAVt 
LOVHia HAIK010R IN "SHAMPOO-TIMi" 



1 Coloring mixture 
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Fingers work it 
through. 



2 Then after a few 
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with the ends. 





3 It's shampooed— 
that's all) 



SEE WHY ROUX COLOR SHAMPOO IS 
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RHONDA FLEMING Co-starring in the Pine-Thomas Production, "CROSSWINDS," 
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RHONDA FLEMING, beautiful Lustre-Creme Girl, one of the "Top-Twelve," selected by "Modern Screen" and a jury of 
famed hair stylists as having the world's loveliest hair. Rhonda Fleming uses Lustre-Creme Shampoo to care for her glamorous hair. 

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When Rhonda Fleming says ... "I use 

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to a girl whose beautiful hair plays a vital 
part in a fabulous glamour-career. 

In a recent issue of "Modern Screen," 
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You, too, will notice a glorious difference 
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Famous Hollywood Stars use Lustre-Creme Shampoo for Glamorous Hair 







Fishermen 

Two ragged urchins, 

Pants' legs flapping, 

Shirt fronts gapping, 
Tousled hair like sun-bleached thatch. 
Trudged proudly homeward, 

Two boys giggling, 

Two fishes wriggling, 
The catchers and the catch. 

Olive A. Divers 



The Dancer 

The night is a dark, Spanish dancer 
She is flitting across the dunes, 
With the moon like a copper rose 
Atilt in her hair. 

The wind has rent the sequinned folds 

Of her mantilla 

And flung it athwart the sky. 

From the black haunches of the sea 
Pours forth the creaming fantasy 
Of her dancing skirts. 

Ann Ruth Schabacker 



AUTUMJN 

1 like the breath of autumn, bitter-sweet 

With mingled bonfire-smoke and piquancy 

Of spicy blooms that flourish hardily 

In country by-way and suburban street; 

I like its rust-brown, brittle grass, which has 

A crisp-voiced sound; its drifting leaves, that hold 

The colors of its sunsets — tawny gold, 

Vermilion, cool sea-green and clear topaz. 

There is beneath its mellow suavity 
A frost-keen edge, unblunted by the sun — 
Prophetic of the days and nights to be, 
When earth will sleep, its faithful labors done . . 
It tells of coming winter, of release 
From restlessness, of white, enfolding peace. 
Amelia Lee Kelley 



RADIO-TV MIRROR WILL PAY $5.00 FOR JANUARY POETRY 

A maximum of ten original poems will be purchased. Limit your poems to sixteen lines. 
No poetry will be returned, nor will the editors enter into correspondence concerning it. 
Poetry for the January issue must be submitted between September 10 and October 10, 1951, 
and accompanied by this notice. If you have not been notified of purchase by November 10, 
you may feel free to submit it to other publications. Poetry for this issue should be ad- 
dressed to: January Poetry, Radio-TV Mirror, 205 E. 42nd Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 




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21 




■ 



Wouldn't you be elated to find yourself, 
on certain days of the month, completely 
free from a lot of the worries that 
are usual at that time? Well, you 
must try the Tampax method of 
sanitary protection. This remark- 
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discards the irksome harness of belts, 
pins and external pads. It is worn inter- 
nally. It cannot be seen or felt when in use. 
How Tampax does help a woman 
maintain her poise and self-confidence 
at such times! It has no outside bulk to 
twist, bulge or show "edges" under 
clothing. No chafing is possible. No 
odor can form. May be worn in tub or 
shower. (No need to change bathing 
habits when you use Tampax.) 

Tampax is made of highly absorbent 
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Accepted for Advertising 
by the Journal of the American Medical Association 



22 



D 



ressmg 
for a date 




Young Nancy Lewis, 
co-emcee of the Paul Whiteman 
TV Teen Club, tells of 

her pre-date preparations. 
First, a thorough cold 
cream cleansing of the face. 

Lipstick is applied 

with a brush to make 
sure that there are no rough 
edges. Nancy uses a pink 
shade, but you should 
choose one for your coloring. 

There's nothing like a 
good brushing to keep hair 

its shining best and to 
make sure it will have 
enough body to stand up for 
an evening of dancing. 




RADIO TELEVISION MIRROR Jt OR 



F< 



BY NANCY LEWIS 

A date is a lot more than a phone 
call from that special man — it 
takes a little something extra to "bring 
out that gleam in his eye. 

Before I go out, to make sure that I 
am well rested for the date, I usually 
lie down for a half-hour. After my 
nap I take a leisurely bath in luke-warm 
water. While in the bath I have a cleans- 
ing cream on my face. I use a long- 
handled stiff brush for back and shoul- 
ders and a complexion brush for my 
face. Then I rinse my face with cold 
water, followed by hot water and fresh- 
en my skin with witch-hazel. 

Nails are always important on a hand- 
holding affair. I make sure that they are 
well-manicured and put on one of the 
new icy-pink shades of polish. 

Now, for my hair. I wash it at least 
once a week — sometimes as much as 
every four days, depending on how dirty 
it gets. I usually use a cream shampoo 
and always a lemon rinse to keep it 
bright and shining. After my bath I 
take my hair down, brush it vigorously 
and then comb it. 

On special dates, when I know I won't 
have too much time to repair my make- 
up, I use a light pancake. This seems to 
hold up longer. After applying the pan- 
cake — very lightly — I brush my eye- 
brows with a small brush. I never use 
an eyebrow pencil as my eyebrows are 
dark enough. However, I do use just a 
touch of light green eye shadow and a 
tiny bit of mascara. 

To give my lips that neat line, I use a 
lip-brush. My lipstick is a pinkish shade 
with the slightest touch of purple in it 
— but, of course, lipsticks vary, as do 
eye shadows, according to your own col- 
oring. I don't use any rouge; instead I 
go over my cheeks with a clean sponge. 
This removes what little make-up is on 
my cheeks and allows that natural color 
to come through. 

For a casual movie date I choose a 
simple sports dress and a little cap to 
keep my hair neat, in spite of the autumn 
wind. For that big date, however, I wear 
my prettiest dress and high heel shoes. 

I've always found it's worth while to 
put a little extra effort into dressing for 
a date. It pays off when the man in your 
life gets that special "That's my girl" 
look of pride in his eyes. 



BETTER LIVING 



Timely lips by Little Lulu 

HOW 00 VOU SCORE ON THESE HELPFUL WAYS TO SAVE ? 




What's best to limber meat grinders? 

r] Chicken bones Q Salad oil \Z\ Bacon fat 

Balky meat grinders get back to work — 
when you dose 'em with salad oil. Keeps 
the food taste-worthy. Speaking of grind- 
ers, there's no ground wood in Kleenex! 
It's a pure tissue; perfectly uniform. 
Free from weak spots, hard particles! 




Chair marks on carpets call for— 

|~l Cleaning fluid Q Steaming 

Cover furniture-flattened spots with damp 
cloth, then steam with hot iron. Lifts nap, 
saves carpet. Let Kleenex tissues give 
you a lift in your household tasks. Extra 
soft! So absorbent; sturdy! And no 
other tissue has that handy Kleenex box! 




How to foil a dripping faucet? 

I I Try a cork L~] Attach a string 

Can't sleep for that "bloop-bleep"? Tie 
a string on the faucet . . . water slides 
down, silently. And see how Kleenex 
tissues save your nerves— for Kleenex 
serves one at a time (not a handful). 
No fumbling! No waste. Saves money. 




To peel peaches quickly, try— 

□ A teakettle □ Steel wool □ A scout fcnift> 

Peaches will shed their skins pronto; 
just pour boiling water over them. Like- 
wise, save beauty-care time, trouble — 
use gentle Kleenex to peel off clinging 
makeup. Because this tissue has the 
perfect balance of softness and strength. 



Kleenex ends waste - saves money... 



© IMTERNATIONAL CELLUCOTTON PRODUCTS CO. 



T. M. REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 




J. AND SAVE WITH 
KLEENEX 



Get several boxes when you buy— 
You'll always have a good supply 



23 



hair 

hard to 
manage? 




$ BE PROUD 



OF YOUR 
HAIR WITH 



y^^^ 2 ^ 



^;y*a 



cf R EME 
a H